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Viewing Port Statistics for OTN PICs

 

The performance monitoring capability in Connectivity Services Director displays information about the health of your network and changing conditions of your optical interfaces. Use this diagnosis and detection mechanism to identify problems with the equipment, pinpoint security attacks, or to analyze trends and categories of errors. This feature includes fault-monitoring details in the dashboard, monitoring pages, and in a dedicated page that displays alarms, events, and system log messages that are generated. Performance monitoring parameters can be viewed in both chart and statistical formats. These charts and statistical details provide essential and cohesive information about system conditions, any discrepancies and malfunctioning, and protocols or components that need to be examined and debugged for better efficiency and working capacity. You can assess the performance of your network, not only at a point in time, but also over a period of time. This feature enables you to determine trending and network-health parameters; for example, whether service-level agreements (SLAs) have been violated.

The port statistics are available for viewing when the port on the FPC is selected. The Packets and Error counters for the selected port are displayed in the Optics PMs dialog box.

To view the port statistical details for OTN PICs:

  1. From the Junos Space user interface, click the Build icon on the Connectivity Services Director banner.

    The workspaces that are applicable to Build mode are displayed on the Tasks pane.

  2. From the View selector, select Device View.

    The functionalities that you can configure in this view are displayed.

  3. From the Device View pane, click the plus sign (+) next to the My Network tree to expand the tree and select the device for which you want to define the optical port settings.

    The selected device is highlighted.

  4. From the Tasks pane, select Device Management > View Physical Inventory.

    An image of the device is displayed on the right pane.

  5. Select an OTN PIC, such as a 2-port 100-Gigabit Ethernet OTN PIC, in the image of the device.

    The Component Info dialog box is displayed on the right pane with the PIC specifications. For example, if you select a 100-Gigabit Ethernet PIC installed in a PTX Series router, the Component Info dialog box is displayed to the right of the graphical view of the chassis. Select the Performance tab at the bottom of the dialog box to open the Optics PMs dialog box.

  6. Click the Performance tab at the bottom of the dialog box.

    The Optics PMs dialog box is displayed with the performance monitoring attributes for the OTN PIC. The Packet Counters and Error Counters tabs are displayed in the dialog box. The date and time at which the dialog box was last refreshed is shown.

    The following fields are displayed in the Packet Counters tab of the Optics PMs dialog box:

    • UniCast In—Ingress unicast packets per second

    • BroadCast In—Ingress broadcast In packet per second

    • Multicast In—Ingress multicast In packet per second

    • Unicast Out—Egress unicast packets per second

    • Broadcast Out—Egress broadcast packets per second

    • Multicast Out—Egress multicast packets per second

    The following fields are displayed in the Error Counters tab of the Optics PMs dialog box:

    • Errors In—Sum of the incoming frame aborts and FCS errors.

    • Drops In—Number of packets dropped by the input queue of the I/O Manager ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.

    • Framing errors In—Number of packets received with an invalid frame checksum (FCS).

    • Runts In—Number of frames received that are smaller than the runt threshold.

    • Policed discards In—Number of frames that the incoming packet match code discarded because they were not recognized or not of interest. Usually, this field reports protocols that the Junos OS does not handle.

    • L3 incompletes In—Number of incoming packets discarded because they failed Layer 3 (usually IPv4) sanity checks of the header. For example, a frame with less than 20 bytes of available IP header is discarded. L3 incomplete errors can be ignored by configuring the ignore-l3-incompletes statement.

    • L2 channel errors In—Number of times the software did not find a valid logical interface for an incoming frame.

    • L2 mismatch timeouts In—Number of malformed or short packets that caused the incoming packet handler to discard the frame as unreadable.

    • FIFO errors In—Number of FIFO errors in the receive direction that are reported by the ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably malfunctioning.

    • Resource errors In—Sum of transmit drops.

    • Oversized frames In—Number of frames that exceed 1518 octets.

    • Jabber frames In—Number of frames that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets), and had either an FCS error or an alignment error. This definition of jabber is different from the definition in IEEE-802.3 section 8.2.1.5 (10BASE5) and section 10.3.1.4 (10BASE2). These documents define jabber as the condition in which any packet exceeds 20 ms. The allowed range to detect jabber is from 20 ms to 150 ms.

    • Fragment frames In—Total number of packets that were less than 64 octets in length (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets), and had either an FCS error or an alignment error. Fragment frames normally increment because both runts (which are normal occurrences caused by collisions) and noise hits are counted.

    • CRC errors In—Total number of packets received that had a length (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets) of between 64 and 1518 octets, inclusive, and had either a bad FCS with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error).

    • Carrier transitions Out—Number of times the interface has gone from down to up. This number does not normally increment quickly, increasing only when the cable is unplugged, the far-end system is powered down and then up, or another problem occurs. If the number of carrier transitions increments quickly (perhaps once every 10 seconds), the cable, the far-end system, or the PIC or PIM is malfunctioning.

    • Errors Out—Sum of the outgoing frame aborts and FCS errors.

    • Drops Out—Number of packets dropped by the output queue of the I/O Manager ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.

    • Collisions Out—Number of Ethernet collisions. The Gigabit Ethernet PIC supports only full-duplex operation, so for Gigabit Ethernet PICs, this number should always remain 0. If it is nonzero, there is a software bug.

    • Aged packets Out—Number of packets that remained in shared packet SDRAM so long that the system automatically purged them. The value in this field should never increment. If it does, it is most likely a software bug or possibly malfunctioning hardware.

    • FIFO errors Out—Number of FIFO errors in the send direction as reported by the ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably malfunctioning.

    • HS link CRC errors Out—Number of errors on the high-speed links between the ASICs responsible for handling the router interfaces.

    • MTU errors Out—Number of packets whose size exceeded the MTU of the interface.

    • Resource errors Out—Sum of transmit drops.

  7. To view a graphical representation of the port statistics, click the Show Chart button above the Packet Counters and Error Counters tabs. The Port Statistics pop-up dialog box is displayed.

    You can view the interface statuses, such as errors and the operational conditions of the interfaces, that enables you in analyzing, troubleshooting, and rectifying problems with dropped packets or untransmitted bytes. Some of the causes for such a loss of traffic or a block in transmission of data packets include overloaded system conditions, profiles and policies that restrict the bandwidth or priority of traffic, network outages, or disruption with physical cable faults. This operation is equivalent to the show interface statistics command that you can run from the Junos OS CLI interface. You can search for specific devices or interfaces by entering a search item and clicking the Search icon. A line graph is displayed with the input packets and errors, and output packets and errors shown on the vertical axis and the time shown on the horizontal axis. The following color-coded legends reference the line graphs:

    • Packets In (Orange)—Number of packets received on the interface

    • Packets Out (Green)—Number of packets sent from the interface

    • Errors In (Blue)—Number of inbound errors received on the interface

    • Errors Out (Purple)—Number of outbound errors transmitted from the interface

    From the Time Interval drop-down box, select 1 Hour, 8 Hours, 1 Day, 1 Week, 1 Month, 3 Months, 6 Months, 1 Year, or Custom to specify the duration for which the data polled from devices needs to be displayed. If you select the Custom option, the Time range popup dialog box is displayed. Specify the date from the calendar, and select the Time From (Start time in the 24-hour time format of collection of data), and Time To (End time in the 24-hour time format of collection of data). Click OK to save the settings. Else, click Cancel to discard the configuration.

    The Interface Details table displays all the UNI parts of the service. Also, the physical interface for the logical interface participating in the service is displayed.

    • Serial Num—Serial number of the hardware component

    • Port Name—Name of the interface

    • Interface Type—Whether the interface is physical or logical

    • Link Type—Operational status of the physical interface: Up, Down.

    • MAC Address—MAC address of the physical interface.

    • Input Packets—Number of packets received on the interface.

    • Output Packets—Number of packets sent from the interface.

    • Last Poll Time—Date and time at which the statistical detail was obtained by polling and retrieving from the device for the specified interface.

    The Packet Counter tab on the right side of the page displays the following fields in a table. It is applicable for physical interfaces only. The values displayed are in rates of packets per second.

    • Input Unicasts—Number of input unicast packets for the physical interface

    • Output Unicasts—Number of output unicast packets for the physical interface

    • Input Multicast—Number of input multicast packets for the physical interface

    • Output Multicast—Number of output multicast packets for the physical interface

    • Input Broadcast—Number of input broadcast packets for the physical interface

    • Output Broadcast—Number of output broadcast packets for the physical interface

    The Error Counter tab on the right side of the page displays the following fields in a table. It is available for physical interfaces only. The values displayed are in rates of packets per second.

    • Input Errors—Number of errors packets received on the physical interface

    • Output Drops—Number of outgoing packets that are dropped by the physical interface

    • Input Framing Errors—Number of packets with framing errors that are received on the physical interface

    • Input Drops—Number of incoming packets that are dropped by the physical interface

    • Input Discards—Number of incoming packets discarded by the physical interface

    • Output Errors—Number of error packets sent out from the physical interface

You can click the Refresh (rotating arrow icon) button at the top of the dialog box to enable the latest settings be retrieved from the device and displayed.