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    Configuring and Managing OTU Details of MX Series and PTX Series Routers for Simplified Management

    Instead of using Junos OS CLI statements and operational commands to configure OTU settings and view the configured parameters, you can view an image of the OTN port using Connectivity Services Director to obtain an intuitive and high-level understanding of the settings and alarms. This view enables you to modify the OTU settings to suit your network deployment needs in a simplified and optimal manner. Because the important OTU settings can be configured alongside the visual representation of the entire chassis that is displayed, this method of managing the OTU settings provides a consolidated and cohesive interface for easy administration of the network.

    You can perform the following tasks in the OTU Section pane:

    • View the optical channel transport unit (OTU) specifications that are currently applied on the device, such as wavelength and power

    • Modify the existing parameters of the optical port to suit your network needs or resolve any alarms caused by certain interface settings

    To configure the OTN parameters for 10-Gigabit Ethernet or 100-Gigabit Ethernet dense wavelength-division multiplexing (DWDM) interfaces:

    1. From the Junos Space user interface, click the Build icon on the Connectivity Services Director banner.

      The workspaces that are applicable to Build mode are displayed on the Tasks pane.

    2. From the View selector, select Device View.

      The functionalities that you can configure in this view are displayed.

    3. From the Device View pane, click the plus sign (+) next to the My Network tree to expand the tree and select the device for which you want to define the optical port settings.

      The network tree is expanded and the selected device is highlighted.

    4. From the Tasks pane, select Device Management > View Physical Inventory.

      An image of the device is displayed on the right pane.

    5. In the image of the device, select an OTN port or interface—for example, a 100-Gigabit Ethernet OTN PIC installed in a PTX Series router.

      The Optical Port dialog box is displayed. At the lower part of the dialog box, the OTU Section and ODU Section panes are displayed in a collapsed form.

    6. Click the OTU Section header at the bottom of the dialog box.

      The OTU Section pane is expanded and displayed.

    7. Click the Status/Config tab at the bottom of the dialog box.

      The configuration settings that pertain to the OTU are displayed as shown in Figure 1.

      Figure 1: OTU Section Dialog Box

      OTU Section Dialog Box
    8. In the Status section, the OTU Status field is displayed. The OTU Status field displays the status of the OTU. Possible values are:
      • OTU-FEC-DEG (forward error correction degraded)

      • OTU-FEC-EXE (excessive errors, FEC_FAIL from the transponder)

      • OTU-AIS (alarm indication signal or all ones signal)

      • OTU-BDI (backward defect identification)

      • OTU-IAE (incoming alignment error)

      • OTU-BIAE (backward incoming alignment error)

      • OTU-TTIM (destination access point identifier [DAPI], source access point identifier [SAPI], or both mismatch from expected to received)

      • OTU-DEG (OTU degraded)

    9. In the Config section, do the following:
      • The Rate field displays the line rate or speed of the OTN signals. One of the following values is displayed, if you have previously configured the OTN mode:

        • fixed-stuff-bytes—Fixed stuff bytes 11.0957 Gbps.

        • no-fixed-stuff-bytes—No fixed stuff bytes 11.0491 Gbps.

        • pass-through—Enable OTN passthrough mode.

        • no-pass-through—Do not enable OTN passthrough mode

        Select a different line rate if needed from the Rate list.

      • The FEC Mode field displays the forward error correction (FEC) mode. One of the following values is displayed, if you have previously configured the FEC mode:

        • EFEC—G.975.1 I.4 enhanced forward error correction (EFEC) is configured to detect and correct bit errors.

        • GFEC—G.709 generic forward error correction (GFEC) mode is configured to detect and correct bit errors.

        • GFEC-SDFEC—GFEC and soft-decision forward error correction (SD-FEC) modes are configured to detect and correct bit errors.

        • NONE—FEC mode is not configured.

        • UFEC—Ultra Forward Error Correction (UFEC) mode is configured to detect and correct bit errors.

        Select a different FEC mode if needed from the FEC Mode list.

      • From the Backward FRR list, specify whether you want to enable or disable preemptive fast reroute (FRR) insertion. By default, FRR ODU backward FRR insertion is disabled.

      • From the Signal Degrade Monitor list, specify whether you want to enable or disable preemptive fast reroute (FRR) signal degrade monitoring. By default, FRR signal degrade monitoring is disabled. If you do not configure the signal-degrade parameter, the default threshold values are used.

      • From the Signal Degrade Interval selector, use the up and down arrows to specify the time interval in milliseconds (ms). This is the interval for which the BER must stay above the signal degradation threshold—as configured in the Ber Threshold Signal Degrade field—for the alarm to raised. After an alarm is raised, if the BER returns below the clear threshold—as configured in the Ber Threshold Clear field—for the specified interval, the alarm is cleared.

        The default value is 100 ms. The range is from 1 ms through 100 ms.

        Note: For the P1-PTX-2-100G-WDM PIC, the BER must stay above the signal degradation threshold for ten consecutive intervals for the alarm to be raised and the BER must stay below the clear threshold for ten consecutive intervals for the alarm to be cleared. For example, if the interval is configured as 10 ms, then the BER must stay above the signal degradation threshold for 100 ms (10 ms * 10 intervals) for the alarm to be raised, or below the clear threshold for 100 ms for the alarm to be cleared.

        Note: For P1-PTX-24-10G-W-SFPP PIC and P2-100GE-OTN PIC, when the router cannot configure BER with the given interval, it selects an optimum interval that is supported for the given BER configuration. If the router is still not able to support the configuration (for example, with a wider gap between the degrade set and clear values), the default values are used and a log is generated.

        For the P2-10G-40G-QSFPP PIC, the time interval is supported in multiples of 100 ms. For example, when you configure the interval as 10 ms, then it is rounded off to the nearest multiple of 100 ms.

        Configuring a high BER threshold for signal degradation and a long interval might cause the internal counter register to be saturated. Such a configuration is ignored by the router, and the default values are used instead. A system log message is logged for this error.

      • In the Ber Threshold Clear field, specify the bit error rate (BER) threshold to clear the interface alarm for signal degradation. You must specify the BER threshold for signal degradation in scientific notation. Both the mantissa and exponent are configurable. Enter the value in the format xE–n, where x is the mantissa and n is the exponent. For example, 4.5E–3.

        The mantissa must be a decimal number. There is no limit on the number of digits before or after the decimal point. The exponent must be an integer from 0 through 9.

        You can configure the BER clear threshold to customize the BER that will clear an interface alarm when signal degrade monitoring is enabled.

        Table 1 shows the default values for pre-FEC BER and ODU BER signal degrade threshold values for different PICs. If the BER signal degrade threshold is not configured, the default value is used.

        Table 1: Default Clear Threshold Values

        PIC

        Default Pre-FEC BER Clear Threshold Value

        Default ODU BER Clear Threshold Value

        P1-PTX-2-100G-WDM

        3.0E–3

        Not supported

        P2-100GE-OTN

        3.0E–3

        1.0E–9

        P1-PTX-24-10G-W-SFPP

        3.0E–3

        Not supported

      • In the Ber Threshold Degrade field, specify the BER threshold is used to raise an interface alarm for signal degradation. You can configure the BER signal degrade threshold to customize the BER that will raise an interface alarm when signal degrade monitoring is enabled. You must specify the BER threshold for signal degradation in scientific notation. Both the mantissa and exponent are configurable. Enter the value in the format xE–n, where x is the mantissa and n is the exponent. For example, 4.5E–3.

        The mantissa must be a decimal number. There is no limit on the number of digits before or after the decimal point. The exponent must be an integer from 0 through 9.

        Note: Configuring a high BER threshold for signal degradation and a long interval might cause the internal bit error counter register to get saturated. For example, for the P1-PTX-2-100G-WDM PIC, the internal bit error counter gets saturated when the error count reaches 2E+29. Therefore, the value of ber-threshold-signal-degrade * line rate / interval must be less than 2E+29 to avoid saturation. Assuming a fixed PIC line rate of 1.27E+11 bits per second and an interval of 1000 ms, the ber-threshold-signal-degrade value must be less than 4.22E–3.

        If the value of the ber-threshold-signal-degrade * line rate / interval exceeds the saturation limit, the configuration is ignored by the router, and the default values are used instead. A system log message is logged for this error.

        Table 2 shows the default values for pre-FEC BER and ODU BER signal degrade threshold values for different PICs. If the BER signal degrade threshold is not configured, the default value is used.

        Table 2: Default Signal Degrade Threshold Values

        PIC

        Default Pre-FEC BER Signal Degrade Threshold Value

        Default ODU BER Signal Degrade Threshold Value

        P1-PTX-2-100G-WDM

        7.5E–3

        Not supported

        P2-100GE-OTN

        7.5E–3

        1.0E–6

        P1-PTX-24-10G-W-SFPP

        7.5E–3

        Not supported

    10. Depending on the configured trace identifier (TTI), any of the following TTI sections are displayed in the OTU Section pane:
      • odu-dapi—ODU Destination Access Point Identifier.

      • odu-expected-receive-dapi—ODU Expected Receive Destination Access Point Identifier.

      • odu-expected-receive-sapi—ODU Expected Receive Source Access Point Identifier.

      • odu-sapi—ODU Source Access Point Identifier.

      • out-dapi—OTU Destination Access Point Identifier.

      • out-expected-receive-dapi—OTU Expected Receive Destination Access Point Identifier.

      • out-expected-receive-sapi—OTU Expected Receive Source Access Point Identifier.

      • out-sapi—OTU Source Access Point Identifier

    11. In the TTI-DAPI section, do the following:
      • The Tx Trace and Rx Trace fields display the transmitted and received path trace values. A path trace identifier is a text string that identifies the circuit. The text string that identifies the circuit. SONET/SDH interfaces allow path trace bytes to be sent inband across the SONET/SDH link. Juniper Networks and other router manufacturers use these bytes to help diagnose misconfigurations and network errors by setting the transmitted path trace message so that it contains the system hostname and name of the physical interface. The received path trace value is the message received from the routing device at the other end of the fiber. The transmitted path trace value is the message that this routing device transmits.

      • In the Tx Trace config field, specify the propagated path trace identifier. A common convention is to use the circuit identifier as the path trace identifier.

      • In the Rx Trace Config field, specify the received path trace identifier. A common convention is to use the circuit identifier as the path trace identifier.

    12. In the TTI-DAPI section, do the following:
      • The Tx Trace and Rx Trace fields display the transmitted and received path trace values. A path trace identifier is a text string that identifies the circuit. The text string that identifies the circuit. SONET/SDH interfaces allow path trace bytes to be sent inband across the SONET/SDH link. Juniper Networks and other router manufacturers use these bytes to help diagnose misconfigurations and network errors by setting the transmitted path trace message so that it contains the system hostname and name of the physical interface. The received path trace value is the message received from the routing device at the other end of the fiber. The transmitted path trace value is the message that this routing device transmits.

      • In the Tx Trace config field, specify the propagated path trace identifier. A common convention is to use the circuit identifier as the path trace identifier.

      • In the Rx Trace Config field, specify the received path trace identifier. A common convention is to use the circuit identifier as the path trace identifier.

    13. Click Update at the top of the dialog box to save the modified OTU settings.

      The settings are saved in the Connectivity Services Director database.

    You can click the Refresh (rotating arrow icon) button at the top of the dialog box to enable the latest settings be retrieved from the device and displayed.

    Modified: 2017-07-20