Help us improve your experience.

Let us know what you think.

Do you have time for a two-minute survey?

Navigation
Guide That Contains This Content
[+] Expand All
[-] Collapse All

    IPLC Architecture and Functional Components Overview

    This topic provides an operational and configuration overview of the IPLC.

    Architecture Overview

    The IPLC base module accepts and then multiplexes 32 individual wavelengths (connected through the ADD and DROP ports on the front panel) into a single fiber pair. If you require more than 32 channels, you can connect the optional IPLC expansion module to the IPLC base module to increase the port capacity of the node to 64 ports.

    The wavelengths from the ADD and DROP ports are then amplified, monitored, and controlled and then transmitted towards the optical network over the Line OUT port on front panelof the IPLC base module. In the reverse direction, the received signals from the optical network on the Line IN port are amplified to overcome for loss in the optical fiber and then demultiplexed into individual wavelengths and sent to the configured ADD and DROP ports on the front panel.

    The 32 channels provided by the IPLC base module are known as the odd channels. The 32 channels provided by the optional IPLC expansion module are known as the even channels. This odd and even designation reflects the default wavelengths the channels support.

    In the multiplexing-add path, the 32 even channels from the IPLC expansion module are interleaved with the 32 odd channels from the IPLC base module. In the demultiplexing-drop path, the 32 even channels are separated from the odd channels using a deinterleaver. All 64 channels go through the main common components used for amplification and equalization. All 32 channels on the IPLC base module are 100 GHz spaced, per the ITU-T Grid Specifications (G.694.1). The 32 channels on the IPLC expansion module are offset from the IPLC base module channels by 50 Hz.

    Single Node Two Optical Line Terminations

    The IPLC architecture can also support two-line terminations on a single node. To form a single node that supports two-line terminations, simply connect two IPLC base modules together through the PT IN-PT OUT ports on the front panel and entering a few simple configuration statements in the Junos OS CLI. The IPLC base module and the expansion module each require a single FPC or PIC chassis slot. This minimizes slot requirements and ensures shelf capacity is not sacrificed in single-node east-west or north-south configurations. These minimal slot requirements are especially important if you are configuring a single-node, two-line termination that requires 64 channels using the IPLC expansion modules.

    The IPLC base module supports 32 dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) channels. Using the IPLC expansion module, you can increase the number of supported DWDM channels to 64.

    Functional Component Overview

    The high-level optical functional block diagram of the combined functions of both the IPLC base module and the IPLC expansion module are shown in Figure 1.

    Figure 1: Combined Functions of the IPLC Base and Expansion Modules

    Combined Functions
of the IPLC Base and Expansion Modules

    IPLC Base Module Functional Components

    The main building blocks of the IPLC base module architecture are as follows:

    • A 2x1 WSS on the add path to select wavelengths from among all channels presented from the 32 add ports of the IPLC base module (shown in blue in Figure 1) and from the 32 add ports on the IPLC expansion module (shown in gray in Figure 1).

    • A booster erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) (E1) followed by a variable optical attenuator (VOA) to compensate for the loss of the WSS, multiplexer, and 3 dB coupler.

    • A variable gain preamplifier EDFA (E2) to compensate for the loss of the preceding fiber span.

    • An optical channel monitor (OCM) with three points of observation including the following:

      • Booster EDFA (E1) output

      • Preamplifier EDFA (E2) output

      • The combined channels of the local add function at the input of the WSS, which indicates which channels (both odd and even channels) are being added locally

      • An optical supervisory channel (OSC), which communicates inband with the far end IPLC modules and is used for the analysis of the fiber span characteristics, performance monitoring, and IPLC fault handing. Simple topology discovery logic communicates with the ILAs and PTX3000 nodes.

      • An optical splitter is used to broadcast the received signal from the output of the preamplifier (E2) toward both DROP and PT IN and PT OUT ports

      • Four power monitors:

        • AWG Add—Monitors the input of the WSS measuring the total input power of the combined channels of the local add function

        • Express In—Monitors the input of the WSS measuring the total input power at the input to the WSS coming from the PT IN and PT OUT express ports

        • Line IN—Monitors the input at the Line IN port, for detection of the incoming line signal optical power

        • Line OUT—Monitors the output at the Line OUT port, for detection of the outgoing line signal optical power

    IPLC Expansion Module Functional Components

    The IPLC expansion module is a passive multiplexer/demultiplexer that interfaces only with the IPLC base module. The IPLC expansion module receives its sole input from and delivers its sole output to the IPLC base module through the PT IN and PT OUT ports. As such, it does not interface directly with the network or the high-speed backplane of the PTX3000 router. Figure 1 shows the main building blocks for both the IPLC base module and expansion module.

    The main building blocks of the IPLC expansion module architecture are as follows:

    • Add filter capable of multiplexing 32 DWDM channels of certain wavelengths

    • Drop filter capable of demultiplexing 32 DWDM channels having the same certain wavelengths

    • Demultiplexing filter whose input (which is also the sole input to the expansion module) is monitored through a power detector. The power detector determines whether light is present. If light is present, the power detector determines whether the light has reached the expansion module through the patch cord between the IPLC base module and the IPLC expansion module.

    Modified: 2017-07-20