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    Monitoring Routing Instances

    This topic describes how to monitor VPN routing instances on MX Series routers by using Connectivity Services Director. Using Connectivity Services Director, you can determine which interfaces and bridge domains belong to the routing instances and view traffic statistics for those interfaces and bridge domains. You can also display connection information for Layer 2 VPN and virtual private LAN service (VPLS) routing instances.

    Connectivity Services Director can be used to monitor the following types of Layer 2 routing instances:

    • Default routing instance

    • Ethernet VPN (EVPN)

    • Layer 2 VPN

    • VPLS

    • Virtual switch

    Connectivity Services Director can be used to monitor the following types of Layer 3 routing instances:

    • Layer 3 VPN

    This topic describes:

    Procedure for Monitoring Routing Instances

    Use the options in the Show Routing Instances window to monitor routing instances.

    1. Click Monitor in the Connectivity Services Director banner.
    2. Select an MX Series router in the View pane that contains the port traffic you want to monitor.
    3. In the Tasks pane, select Tasks > Show Routing Instances.

      The Show Routing Instances window opens. For information about this window, click the Help button in the title bar of the window or see Show Routing Instances Window.

    Show Routing Instances Window

    The Show Routing Instances window lists the routing instances configured on a selected device. Use this window to display the interfaces or bridge domains belonging to a routing instance and obtain traffic statistics for the interfaces. You can also display information about the VPLS and Layer 2 VPN connections. Table 1 describes the fields in this window.

    Table 1: Fields in the Show Routing Instances Window

    Field

    Description

    Routing Instance Name

    Name of the routing instance.

    The default routing instance is named default-switch.

    Type

    Identifies the routing instance type:

    • EVPN

    • L2VPN

    • L3VPN

    • Virtual Switch

      The default routing instance is of this type.

    • VPLS

    • VRF (L3VPN)

    Details

    Provides the following information (if configured for the routing instance):

    • Route Distinguisher—Used to identify all routes that are part of the VPN. The route distinguisher makes IP addresses globally unique, so that the same IP address prefixes can be used for different VPNs.

    • Target—Extended BGP community used to match routes for import and export.

    Interfaces

    Displays the number of interfaces belonging to the routing instance. Click the number to open the Show Interfaces window, described in Show Interfaces Window.

    Bridge Domains

    Displays the number of bridge domains belonging to the routing instance. Click the number to open the Show Bridged Domains window, described in Show Bridge Domains Window.

    Actions

    • Click Show Connections to display information about Layer 2 VPN and VPLS connections. The information described in Show Connections is displayed. This link is available only for Layer 2 VPN and VPLS routing instances.

    • Click Show MAC Table to display the MAC table for the selected routing instance. For details, see Show MAC Table.

    • Click Show Routing Table to view the routing table information for the selected routing instance. For details, see Show Routing Tables.

    Show Interfaces Window

    The Show Interfaces window lists the logical interfaces configured on the routing instance and provides the information about the interfaces as described in Table 2.

    Table 2: Show Interfaces Information

    Field

    Description

    Interface Name

    The interface name.

    Port Mode

    Indicates one of two modes—access or trunk:

    • Access—The interface can be in a single VLAN only.

    • Trunk—The interface can be in multiple VLANs and accept tagged packets from multiple devices.

    Interface State

    Indicates whether the interface is or .

    STP State

    Indicates whether the interface is in a discarding (blocked) or in forwarding (unblocked) state. (Not shown for interfaces belonging to Layer 2 VPN and Layer 3 VPN routing instances.)

    Local IP Address

    Local IP address. (Shown only for interfaces belonging to Layer 2 VPN and Layer 3 VPN routing instances.)

    Remote IP Address

    Remote IP address. (Shown only for interfaces belonging to Layer 2 VPN and Layer 3 VPN routing instances.)

    Actions

    • Click View Statistics to display traffic statistics for the interface. The Show Interface Statistics window opens, which charts the number of input and output packets and the number of input and output bytes.

    • Click Show MAC Table to display the MAC table for the interface. For more details, see Show MAC Table.

    Show Bridge Domains Window

    The Show Bridge Domains window lists the bridge domains configured on the routing instance. To display information about the VLAN IDs and interfaces configured on a bridge domain, select the bridge domain. Table 3 describes the information provided in the Show Bridge Domains window.

    Table 3: Show Bridge Domains Information

    Field

    Description

    Bridge Domains

    The bridge domain name.

    Actions

    Click Show MAC Table to display the MAC table for the selected bridge domain. For details, see Show MAC Table.

    VLAN ID

    The VLAN ID or IDs assigned to the bridge domain.

    Interface Name

    The name of a logical interface assigned to the VLAN ID.

    Port Mode

    Indicates one of two modes—access or trunk:

    • Access—The interface can be in a single VLAN only.

    • Trunk—The interface can be in multiple VLANs and accept tagged packets from multiple devices.

    Interface State

    Indicates whether the interface is or .

    STP State

    Indicates whether the interface is in a discarding (blocked) or in forwarding (unblocked) state.

    Actions

    • Click View Statistics to display traffic statistics for the interface. The Show Interface Statistics window opens, which charts the number of input and output packets and the number of input and output bytes.

    • Click Show MAC Table to display the MAC table for the interface. For details, see Show MAC Table.

    Show Connections

    The Show Connections window provides information about the VPN connections for Layer 2 VPN and VPLS routing instances as described in Table 4.

    Table 4: Show Connections Information

    Field

    Description

    Local Site Name

    Name of the local site.

    Local Site ID

    Identifier for the local site.

    Local Interface Name

    Name of the local interface.

    Interface Status

    Indicates whether the local interface is or .

    Remote Site ID

    Identifier for the remote site.

    Remote IP

    IP address of the remote provider edge device (PE device).

    Connection Status

    Status of the connection:

    • EI—The local VPN interface is configured with an encapsulation that is not supported.

    • EM—The encapsulation type received on this connection from the neighbor does not match the local connection interface encapsulation type.

    • VC-Dn—The virtual circuit is currently down.

    • CM—The two routers do not agree on a control word, which causes a control word mismatch.

    • CN—The virtual circuit is not provisioned properly.

    • OR—The label associated with the virtual circuit is out of range.

    • OL—No advertisement has been received for this virtual circuit from the neighbor. There is no outgoing label available for use by this virtual circuit.

    • LD—All of the CE-facing interfaces to the local site are down. Therefore, the connection to the local site is signaled as down to the other PE routers. No pseudowires can be established.

    • RD—All the interfaces to the remote neighbor are down. Therefore, the remote site has been signaled as down to the other PE routers. No pseudowires can be established.

    • LN—The local site has lost path selection to the remote site and therefore no pseudowires can be established from this local site.

    • RN—The remote site has lost path selection to a local site or to a remote site and therefore no pseudowires are established to this remote site.

    • XX—The connection is down for an unknown reason. This is a programming error.

    • MM—The MTUs for the local site and the remote site do not match.

    • BK—The router is using a backup connection.

    • PF—Profile parse failure.

    • RS—The remote site is in a standby state.

    • NC—The interface encapsulation is not configured as an appropriate CCC (circuit cross-connect), TCC (translational cross-connect), Layer 2 VPN, or VPLS encapsulation.

    • WE—The encapsulation configured for the interface does not match with the encapsulation configured for the associated connection within the routing instance.

    • NP—The router detects that interface hardware is not present. The hardware might be offline, a PIC might not be of the compatible type, or the interface might be configured in a different routing instance.

    • ->—Only the outbound connection is up.

    • <-—Only the inbound connection is up.

    • Up—The connection is operational.

    • Dn—The connection is down.

    • CF—The router cannot find enough bandwidth to the remote router to satisfy the connection bandwidth requirement.

    • SC—The local site identifier is the same as the remote site identifier. No pseudowire can be established between these two sites. You must configure different values for the local and remote site identifiers.

    • LM—The local site identifier is not the minimum designated, which means it is not of the lowest value. There is another local site with a lower value for site identifier. Pseudowires are not being established to this local site and the associated local site identifier is not being used to distribute Layer 2 VPN or VPLS label blocks. However, this is not an error state. Traffic continues to be forwarded to the PE router interfaces connected to the local sites when the local sites are in this state.

    • RM—The remote site identifier is not the minimum designated, which means it is not the lowest. There is another remote site connected to the same PE router which has lower site identifier. The PE router cannot establish a pseudowire to this remote site and the associated remote site identifier cannot be used to distribute VPLS label blocks. However, this is not an error state. Traffic continues to be forwarded to the PE router interface connected to this remote site when the remote site is in this state.

    • IL—The incoming packets for the connection have no MPLS label.

    • MI—The configured mesh group identifier is in use by another system in the network.

    • ST—The router has switched to a standby connection.

    • PB—Profile is busy.

    • SN—The neighbor is static.

    Time Last Up

    The time when the connection was last in the Up condition.

    Show Routing Tables

    The Routing Tables window enables you view the routing table information for the selected virtual routing instance. For L3VPN and EVP services, you can determine which LSPs or tunnels are being used by looking at the routing tables.

    • Routing Tables—The Routing Tables table shows the routing tables associated with the virtual instance and the number of active routes in each table. Click on a routing table to display the actual contents of the routing table.

    • Details—The Details table shows the contents of the selected routing table. Table 5 displays the fields that are displayed in the Details table.

    Table 5: Show Routing Table Field Descriptions

    Name

    Description

    Routing Instance

    Name of the routing instance.

    Number of Destinations

    Number of destinations for which there are routes in the routing table.

    Active Routes

    Number of routes that are active.

    Hidden Routes

    Number of routes that are not used because of routing policy.

    Hold-down Routes

    Number of routes that are in the hold-down state before being declared inactive.

    Total Routes

    Total number of routes.

    Destination Prefix

    Route destination (for example:10.0.0.1/24). Sometimes the route information is presented in another format, such as:

    • MPLS-label (for example, 80001).

    • interface-name (for example, ge-1/0/2).

    • neighbor-address:control-word-status:encapsulation type:vc-id :source (Layer 2 circuit only. For example, 10.1.1.195:NoCtrlWord:1:1:Local/96):

      • neighbor-address—Address of the neighbor.

      • control-word-status—Whether the use of the control word has been negotiated for this virtual circuit: NoCtrlWord or CtrlWord.

      • encapsulation type—Type of encapsulation, represented by a number: (1) Frame Relay DLCI, (2) ATM AAL5 VCC transport, (3) ATM transparent cell transport, (4) Ethernet, (5) VLAN Ethernet, (6) HDLC, (7) PPP, (8) ATM VCC cell transport, (10) ATM VPC cell transport.

      • vc-id—Virtual circuit identifier.

      • source—Source of the advertisement: Local or Remote.

    State

    State of the route.

    Protocol

    Name of the protocol from which the route was learned. For example, OSPF, RSVP, and Static.

    Protocol Preference

    Preferred protocol for this routing instance. Junos OS uses this preference to choose which routes become active in the routing table.

    Age

    Displays how long since the route was learned.

    Metric

    Cost value of the indicated route. For routes within an AS, the cost is determined by the IGP and the individual protocol metrics. For external routes, destinations, or routing domains, the cost is determined by a preference value.

    BGP Local Preference

    A metric used by BGP sessions to indicate the degree of preference for an external route. The route with the highest local preference value is preferred.

    Route Learned From

    Interface from which the route was received.

    AS Path

    AS path through which the route was learned. The letters at the end of the AS path indicate the path origin, providing an indication of the state of the route at the point at which the AS path originated:

    • I—IGP

    • E—EGP

    • ?—Incomplete; typically, the AS path was aggregated.

    Validation State

    (BGP-learned routes) Validation status of the route:

    • Invalid—Indicates that the prefix is found, but either the corresponding AS received from the EBGP peer is not the AS that appears in the database, or the prefix length in the BGP update message is longer than the maximum length permitted in the database.

    • Unknown—Indicates that the prefix is not among the prefixes or prefix ranges in the database.

    • Valid—Indicates that the prefix and autonomous system pair are found in the database.

    Next Hop Type

    Next hop to the destination. An angle bracket (>) indicates that the route is the selected route.

    If the destination is Discard, traffic is dropped.

    Local Interface

    The local interface used to reach the next hop.

    Address

    IP address of the interface.

    Via Interface

    Interface used to reach the next hop. If there is more than one interface available to the next hop, the interface that is actually used is followed by the word Selected.

    MPLS Label

    MPLS label and operation occurring at the next hop. The operation can be pop (where a label is removed from the top of the stack), push (where another label is added to the label stack), or swap (where a label is replaced by another label).

    Show MAC Table

    The Show MAC table window displays the MAC table for the selected routing instance. Table 6 describes the fields that are displayed in the Show MAC Table window.

    Table 6: Show MAC Table fields

    Field Name

    Description

    Routing Instance

    Name of the routing instance.

    Type

    Identifies the routing instance type:

    • EVPN

    • L2VPN

    • L3VPN

    • Virtual Switch

      The default routing instance is of this type.

    • VPLS

    • VRF (L3VPN)

    Bridge Domain

    Name of the bridging domain.

    VLAN ID

    VLAN ID of the routing instance or bridge domain in which the MAC address was learned.

    MAC Address

    MAC address or addresses learned on a logical interface.

    MAC Flags

    Status of MAC address learning properties for each interface:

    • S—Static MAC address is configured.

    • D—Dynamic MAC address is configured.

    • L—Locally learned MAC address is configured.

    • C—Control MAC address is configured.

    • SE—MAC accounting is enabled.

    • NM—Non-configured MAC.

    • R—Remote PE MAC address is configured.

    Logical Interface

    Name of the logical interface.

    Modified: 2016-12-16