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Basic RIP Configuration

RIP Configuration Overview

To achieve basic connectivity between all RIP hosts in a RIP network, you enable RIP on every interface that is expected to transmit and receive RIP traffic, as described in the steps that follow.

To configure a RIP network:

  1. Configure network interfaces. See the Junos OS Interfaces Configuration Guide for Security Devices.
  2. Define RIP groups, which are logical groupings of interfaces, and add interfaces to the groups. Then, configure a routing policy to export directly connected routes and routes learned through RIP routing exchanges. See Example: Configuring a Basic RIP Network.
  3. (Optional) Configure metrics to control traffic through the RIP network. See Example: Controlling Traffic in a RIP Network with an Incoming Metric and Example: Controlling Traffic in a RIP Network with an Outgoing Metric.
  4. (Optional) Configure authentication to ensure that only trusted routers participate in the autonomous system’s routing. See Enabling Authentication with Plain-Text Passwords and Enabling Authentication with MD5 Authentication (CLI Procedure).

Understanding Basic RIP Routing

RIP is an interior gateway protocol (IGP) that routes packets within a single autonomous system (AS). By default, RIP does not advertise the subnets that are directly connected through the device's interfaces. For traffic to pass through a RIP network, you must create a routing policy to export these routes. Advertising only the direct routes propagates the routes to the immediately adjacent RIP-enabled router only. To propagate all routes through the entire RIP network, you must configure the routing policy to export the routes learned through RIP.

Example: Configuring a Basic RIP Network

This example shows how to configure a basic RIP network.

Requirements

No special configuration beyond device initialization is required before configuring this example.

Overview

In this example, you configure a basic RIP network, create a RIP group called rip-group, and add the directly connected interfaces to the RIP group. Then you configure a routing policy to advertise direct routes using policy statement advertise-routes-through-rip.

By default, Junos OS does not advertise RIP routes, not even routes that are learned through RIP. To advertise RIP routes, you must configure and apply an export routing policy that advertises RIP-learned and direct routes.

In Junos OS, you do not need to configure the RIP version. RIP version 2 is used by default.

To use RIP on the device, you must configure RIP on all of the RIP interfaces within the network. Figure 1 shows the topology used in this example.

Figure 1: Sample RIP Network TopologySample RIP Network Topology

CLI Quick Configuration shows the configuration for all of the devices in Figure 1. The section #d144e69__d144e190 describes the steps on Device R1.

Topology

Configuration

Procedure

CLI Quick Configuration

To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level, and then enter commit from configuration mode.

Device R1

Device R2

Device R3

Step-by-Step Procedure

The following example requires you to navigate various levels in the configuration hierarchy. For information about navigating the CLI, see Using the CLI Editor in Configuration Mode in the CLI User Guide.

To configure a basic RIP network:

  1. Configure the network interfaces.

    This example shows multiple loopback interface addresses to simulate attached networks.

  2. Create the RIP group and add the interface.

    To configure RIP in Junos OS, you must configure a group that contains the interfaces on which RIP is enabled. You do not need to enable RIP on the loopback interface.

  3. Create the routing policy to advertise both direct and RIP-learned routes.

  4. Apply the routing policy.

    In Junos OS, you can only apply RIP export policies at the group level.

Results

From configuration mode, confirm your configuration by entering the show interfaces, show protocols, and show policy-options commands. If the output does not display the intended configuration, repeat the configuration instructions in this example to correct it.

If you are done configuring the device, enter commit from configuration mode.

Verification

Confirm that the configuration is working properly.

Checking the Routing Table

Purpose

Verify that the routing table is populated with the expected routes..

Action

From operational mode, enter the show route protocol rip command.

Meaning

The output shows that the routes have been learned from Device R2 and Device R3.

If you were to delete the from protocol rip condition in the routing policy on Device R2, the remote routes from Device R3 would not be learned on Device R1.

Looking at the Routes That Device R1 Is Advertising to Device R2

Purpose

Verify that Device R1 is sending the expected routes.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show route advertising-protocol rip command.

Meaning

Device R1 is sending routes to its directly connected networks.

Looking at the Routes That Device R1 Is Receiving from Device R2

Purpose

Verify that Device R1 is receiving the expected routes.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show route receive-protocol rip command.

Meaning

Device R1 is receiving from Device R2 all of Device R2’s directly connected networks. Device R1 is also receiving from Device R2 all of Device R3’s directly connected networks, which Device R2 learned from Device R3 through RIP.

Verifying the RIP-Enabled Interfaces

Purpose

Verify that all RIP-enabled Interfaces are available and active.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show rip neighbor command.

Meaning

The output shows that the RIP-enabled interface on Device R1 is operational.

In general for this command, the output shows a list of the RIP neighbors that are configured on the device. Verify the following information:

  • Each configured interface is present. Interfaces are listed in alphabetical order.

  • Each configured interface is up. The state of the interface is listed in the Local State column. A state of Up indicates that the link is passing RIP traffic. A state of Dn indicates that the link is not passing RIP traffic. In a point-to-point link, this state generally means that either the end point is not configured for RIP or the link is unavailable.

Verifying the Exchange of RIP Messages

Purpose

Verify that RIP messages are being sent and received on all RIP-enabled interfaces.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show rip statistics command.

Meaning

The output shows the number of RIP routes learned. It also shows the number of RIP updates sent and received on the RIP-enabled interfaces. Verify the following information:

  • The number of RIP routes learned matches the number of expected routes learned. Subnets learned by direct connectivity through an outgoing interface are not listed as RIP routes.

  • RIP updates are being sent on each RIP-enabled interface. If no updates are being sent, the routing policy might not be configured to export routes.

  • RIP updates are being received on each RIP-enabled interface. If no updates are being received, the routing policy might not be configured to export routes on the host connected to that subnet. The lack of updates might also indicate an authentication error.

Verifying Reachability of All Hosts in the RIP Network

Purpose

Use the traceroute command on each loopback address in the network to verify that all hosts in the RIP network are reachable from each Juniper Networks device.

Action

From operational mode, enter the traceroute command.

Meaning

Each numbered row in the output indicates a routing hop in the path to the host. The three-time increments indicate the round-trip time (RTT) between the device and the hop for each traceroute packet.

To ensure that the RIP network is healthy, verify the following information:

  • The final hop in the list is the host you want to reach.

  • The number of expected hops to the host matches the number of hops in the traceroute output. The appearance of more hops than expected in the output indicates that a network segment is probably unreachable. It might also indicate that the incoming or outgoing metric on one or more hosts has been set unexpectedly.