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Secure Wire on Security Devices

Understanding Secure Wire on Security Devices

Traffic that arrives on a specific interface can be forwarded unchanged through another interface. This mapping of interfaces, called secure wire, allows an SRX Series to be deployed in the path of network traffic without requiring a change to routing tables or a reconfiguration of neighboring devices. Figure 1 shows a typical in-path deployment of an SRX Series with secure wire.

Figure 1: SRX Series In-Path Deployment with Secure WireSRX Series In-Path Deployment with Secure Wire

Secure wire maps two peer interfaces. It differs from transparent and route modes in that there is no switching or routing lookup to forward traffic. As long as the traffic is permitted by a security policy, a packet arriving on one peer interface is immediately forwarded unchanged out of the other peer interface. There is no routing or switching decision made on the packet. Return traffic is also forwarded unchanged.

Secure wire mapping is configured with the secure-wire statement at the [edit security forwarding-options] hierarchy level; two Ethernet logical interfaces must be specified. The Ethernet logical interfaces must be configured with family ethernet-switching and each pair of interfaces must belong to the VLAN(s). The interfaces must be bound to security zones and a security policy configured to permit traffic between the zones.

This feature is available on Ethernet logical interfaces only; both IPv4 and IPv6 traffic are supported. You can configure interfaces for access or trunk mode. Secure wire supports chassis cluster redundant Ethernet interfaces. This feature does not support security features not supported in transparent mode, including NAT and IPsec VPN.

Secure wire supports Layer 7 features like AppSecure, SSL proxy, UTM and IPS/IDP.

Secure wire is a special case of Layer 2 transparent mode on SRX Series devices that provide point-to-point connections. This means that the two interfaces of a secure wire must ideally be directly connected to Layer 3 entities, such as routers or hosts. Secure wire interfaces can be connected to switches. However, note that a secure wire interface forwards all arriving traffic to the peer interface only if the traffic is permitted by a security policy.

Secure wire can coexist with Layer 3 mode. While you can configure Layer 2 and Layer 3 interfaces at the same time, traffic forwarding occurs independently on Layer 2 and Layer 3 interfaces.

Secure wire can coexist with Layer 2 transparent mode. If both features exist on the same SRX Series device, you need to configure them in different VLANs.

Note:

Integrated routing and bridging (IRB) interfaces are not supported with secure wire.

Example: Simplifying SRX Series Device Deployment with Secure Wire over Access Mode Interfaces

If you are connecting an SRX Series device to other network devices, you can use secure wire to simplify the device deployment in the network. No changes to routing or forwarding tables on the SRX Series device and no reconfiguration of neighboring devices is needed. Secure wire allows traffic to be forwarded unchanged between specified access mode interfaces on an SRX Series device as long as it is permitted by security policies or other security features. Follow this example if you are connecting an SRX Series device to other network devices through access mode interfaces.

This example shows how to configure a secure wire mapping for two access mode interfaces. This configuration applies to scenarios where user traffic is not VLAN tagged.

Requirements

No special configuration beyond device initialization is required before configuring this feature.

Overview

This example configures the secure wire access-sw that maps interface ge-0/0/3.0 to interface ge-0/0/4.0. The two peer interfaces are configured for access mode. The VLAN ID 10 is configured for the vlan-10 and the access mode interfaces.

Note:

A specific VLAN ID must be configured for a VLAN.

Topology

Figure 2 shows the access mode interfaces that are mapped in secure wire access-sw.

Figure 2: Secure Wire Access Mode InterfacesSecure Wire Access Mode Interfaces

Configuration

Procedure

CLI Quick Configuration
Note:

Starting in Junos OS Release 15.1X49-D10 and Junos OS Release 17.3R1, some Layer 2 CLI configuration statements are enhanced, and some commands are changed. For detailed information about the modified hierarchies, see Enhanced Layer 2 CLI Configuration Statement and Command Changes for Security Devices.

The configuration statements shown below are for Junos OS Release 15.1X49-D10 or higher and Junos OS Release 17.3R1.

To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level, and then enter commit from configuration mode.

Step-by-Step Procedure

The following example requires you to navigate various levels in the configuration hierarchy. For instructions on how to do that, see Using the CLI Editor in Configuration Mode in the CLI User Guide.

To configure a secure wire mapping for access mode interfaces:

  1. Configure the VLAN.

  2. Configure the access mode interfaces.

  3. Configure the secure wire mapping.

  4. Configure security zones.

  5. Create address book entries. Attach security zones to the address books.

  6. Configure a security policy to permit mail traffic.

Results

From configuration mode, confirm your configuration by entering the show vlans, show interfaces, show security forwarding-options, and show security zones commands. If the output does not display the intended configuration, repeat the instructions in this example to correct the configuration.

If you are done configuring the device, enter commit from configuration mode.

Verification

Confirm that the configuration is working properly.

Verifying Secure Wire Mapping

Purpose

Verify the secure wire mapping.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show security forwarding-options secure-wire command.

Verifying the VLAN

Purpose

Verify the VLAN.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show vlans vlan-10 command.

Verifying Policy Configuration

Purpose

Verify information about security policies..

Action

From operational mode, enter the show security policies detail command.

Example: Simplifying SRX Series Device Deployment with Secure Wire over Trunk Mode Interfaces

If you are connecting an SRX Series device to other network devices, you can use secure wire to simplify the device deployment in the network. No changes to routing or forwarding tables on the SRX Series device and no reconfiguration of neighboring devices is needed. Secure wire allows traffic to be forwarded unchanged between specified trunk mode interfaces on an SRX Series device as long as it is permitted by security policies or other security features. Follow this example if you are connecting an SRX Series device to other network devices through trunk mode interfaces.

Requirements

No special configuration beyond device initialization is required before configuring this feature.

Overview

This example configures the secure wire trunk-sw that maps interface ge-0/1/0.0 to interface ge-0/1/1.0. The two peer interfaces are configured for trunk mode and carry user traffic tagged with VLAN IDs from 100 to 102. The VLAN ID list 100-102 is configured for the VLAN vlan-100 and the trunk mode interfaces.

Note:

A specific VLAN ID must be configured for a VLAN.

Topology

Figure 3 shows the trunk mode interfaces that are mapped in secure wire trunk-sw.

Figure 3: Secure Wire Trunk Mode InterfacesSecure Wire Trunk Mode Interfaces

Configuration

Procedure

CLI Quick Configuration

To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level, and then enter commit from configuration mode.

Step-by-Step Procedure

The following example requires you to navigate various levels in the configuration hierarchy. For instructions on how to do that, see Using the CLI Editor in Configuration Mode in the CLI User Guide.

To configure a secure wire mapping for trunk mode interfaces:

  1. Configure the VLAN.

  2. Configure the trunk mode interfaces.

  3. Configure the secure wire mapping.

  4. Configure security zones.

  5. Configure a security policy to permit traffic.

Results

From configuration mode, confirm your configuration by entering the show vlans, show interfaces, show security forwarding-options, and show security zones commands. If the output does not display the intended configuration, repeat the instructions in this example to correct the configuration.

If you are done configuring the device, enter commit from configuration mode.

Verification

Confirm that the configuration is working properly.

Verifying Secure Wire Mapping

Purpose

Verify the secure wire mapping.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show security forwarding-options secure-wire command.

Verifying the VLAN

Purpose

Verify the VLAN.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show vlans command.

Note:

VLANs are automatically expanded, with one VLAN for each VLAN ID in the VLAN ID list.

Example: Simplifying SRX Series Device Deployment with Secure Wire over Aggregated Interface Member Links

If you are connecting an SRX Series device to other network devices, you can use secure wire to simplify the device deployment in the network. No changes to routing or forwarding tables on the SRX Series device and no reconfiguration of neighboring devices is needed. Secure wire allows traffic to be forwarded unchanged between specified aggregated interface member links on an SRX Series device as long as it is permitted by security policies or other security features. Follow this example if you are connecting an SRX Series device to other network devices through aggregated interface member links.

Note:

LACP is not supported. Secure wire mappings can be configured for member links of link bundles instead of directly mapping aggregated Ethernet interfaces. When the ports, or interfaces on SRX Series device are in trunk mode, the device do not transmit the LACP PDUs and fails the LACP. You must add a native vlan to secure wire interfaces, to bring LACP up.

Note:

On SRX210, SRX220, SRX240, SRX300, SRX320, SRX340, SRX345, SRX550, and SRX650 devices, when you create an aggregated interface with two or more ports and set the family to Ethernet switching, and if a link in the bundle goes down, the traffic forwarded through the same link will be rerouted two seconds later. This causes an outage for the traffic being sent to the link until reroute is complete.

Requirements

No special configuration beyond device initialization is required before configuring this feature.

Overview

This example configures secure wires for two aggregated Ethernet interface link bundles with two links each. Two separate secure wires ae-link1 and ae-link2 are configured using one link from each aggregated Ethernet link bundle. This static mapping requires that the two link bundles have the same number of links.

For link bundles, all logical interfaces of the secure wire mappings must belong to the same VLAN. VLAN ID 10 is configured for the VLAN vlan-10 and the logical interfaces. All logical interfaces of a link bundle must belong to the same security zone.

Note:

A specific VLAN ID or VLAN ID list must be configured for a VLAN.

Topology

Figure 4 shows the aggregated interfaces that are mapped in secure wire configurations.

Figure 4: Secure Wire Aggregated InterfacesSecure Wire Aggregated Interfaces

Configuration

Procedure

CLI Quick Configuration

To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level, and then enter commit from configuration mode.

Step-by-Step Procedure

The following example requires you to navigate various levels in the configuration hierarchy. For instructions on how to do that, see Using the CLI Editor in Configuration Mode in the CLI User Guide.

To configure a secure wire mapping for aggregated interface member links:

  1. Configure the VLAN.

  2. Configure the interfaces.

  3. Configure the secure wire mappings.

  4. Configure security zones.

  5. Configure a security policy to permit traffic.

Results

From configuration mode, confirm your configuration by entering the show vlans, show interfaces, show security forwarding-options, and show security zones commands. If the output does not display the intended configuration, repeat the instructions in this example to correct the configuration.

If you are done configuring the device, enter commit from configuration mode.

Verification

Confirm that the configuration is working properly.

Verifying Secure Wire Mapping

Purpose

Verify the secure wire mapping.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show security forwarding-options secure-wire command.

Verifying the VLAN

Purpose

Verify the VLAN.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show vlans vlan-10 command.

Example: Simplifying Chassis Cluster Deployment with Secure Wire over Redundant Ethernet Interfaces

If you are connecting an SRX Series chassis cluster to other network devices, you can use secure wire to simplify the cluster deployment in the network. No changes to routing or forwarding tables on the cluster and no reconfiguration of neighboring devices is needed. Secure wire allows traffic to be forwarded unchanged between specified redundant Ethernet interfaces on the SRX Series chassis cluster as long as it is permitted by security policies or other security features. Follow this example if you are connecting an SRX Series chassis cluster to other network devices through redundant Ethernet interfaces.

Requirements

Before you begin:

  • Connect a pair of the same SRX Series devices in a chassis cluster.

  • Configure the chassis cluster node ID and cluster ID.

  • Set the number of redundant Ethernet interfaces in the chassis cluster.

  • Configure the chassis cluster fabric.

  • Configure chassis cluster redundancy group (in this example redundancy group 1 is used).

For more information, see the Chassis Cluster User Guide for SRX Series Devices.

Overview

Secure wire is supported over redundant Ethernet interfaces in a chassis cluster. The two redundant Ethernet interfaces must be configured in the same redundancy group. If failover occurs, both redundant Ethernet interfaces must fail over together.

Note:

Secure wire mapping of redundant Ethernet link aggregation groups (LAGs) are not supported. LACP is not supported.

This example configures the secure wire reth-sw that maps ingress interface reth0.0 to egress interface reth1.0. Each redundant Ethernet interface consists of two child interfaces, one on each node of the chassis cluster. The two redundant Ethernet interfaces are configured for access mode. VLAN ID 10 is configured for the VLAN vlan-10 and the redundant Ethernet interfaces.

Note:

A specific VLAN ID or VLAN ID list must be configured for a VLAN.

Topology

Figure 5 shows the redundant Ethernet interfaces that are mapped in secure wire reth-sw.

Figure 5: Secure Wire Redundant Ethernet InterfacesSecure Wire Redundant Ethernet Interfaces

Configuration

Procedure

CLI Quick Configuration

To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level, and then enter commit from configuration mode.

Step-by-Step Procedure

The following example requires you to navigate various levels in the configuration hierarchy. For instructions on how to do that, see Using the CLI Editor in Configuration Mode in the CLI User Guide.

To configure a secure wire mapping for chassis cluster redundant Ethernet interfaces:

  1. Configure the VLAN.

  2. Configure the redundant Ethernet interfaces.

  3. Configure the secure wire mapping.

  4. Configure security zones.

  5. Configure a security policy to permit traffic.

Results

From configuration mode, confirm your configuration by entering the show vlans, show interfaces, show security forwarding-options, and show security zones commands. If the output does not display the intended configuration, repeat the instructions in this example to correct the configuration.

If you are done configuring the device, enter commit from configuration mode.

Verification

Confirm that the configuration is working properly.

Verifying Secure Wire Mapping

Purpose

Verify the secure wire mapping.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show security forwarding-options secure-wire command.

Verifying the VLAN

Purpose

Verify the VLAN.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show vlan vlan-10 command.

Example: Simplifying Chassis Cluster Deployment with Secure Wire over Aggregated Redundant Ethernet Interfaces

If you are connecting an SRX Series chassis cluster to other network devices, you can use secure wire to simplify the cluster deployment in the network. No changes to routing or forwarding tables on the cluster and no reconfiguration of neighboring devices is needed. Secure wire allows traffic to be forwarded unchanged between specified redundant Ethernet interfaces on the SRX Series chassis cluster as long as it is permitted by security policies or other security features. Follow this example if you are connecting an SRX Series chassis cluster to other network devices through aggregated redundant Ethernet interfaces.

Note:

Secure wires cannot be configured for redundant Ethernet interface link aggregation groups (LAGs). For the secure wire mapping shown in this example, there is no LAG configuration on the SRX Series chassis cluster. Each redundant Ethernet interface consists of two child interfaces, one on each node of the chassis cluster. Users on upstream or downstream devices connected to the SRX Series cluster can configure the redundant Ethernet interface child links in LAGs.

Requirements

Before you begin:

  • Connect a pair of the same SRX Series devices in a chassis cluster.

  • Configure the chassis cluster node ID and cluster ID.

  • Set the number of redundant Ethernet interfaces in the chassis cluster.

  • Configure the chassis cluster fabric.

  • Configure the chassis cluster redundancy group (in this example, redundancy group 1 is used).

For more information, see the Chassis Cluster User Guide for SRX Series Devices.

Overview

This example configures secure wires for four redundant Ethernet interfaces: reth0, reth1, reth2, and reth3. Each redundant Ethernet interface consists of two child interfaces, one on each node of the chassis cluster. All four redundant Ethernet interfaces must be in the same VLAN—in this example, the VLAN is vlan-0. Two of the redundant Ethernet interfaces, reth0.0 and reth2.0, are assigned to the trust zone, while the other two interfaces, reth1.0 and reth3.0, are assigned to the untrust zone.

This example configures the following secure wires:

  • reth-sw1 maps interface reth0.0 to interface reth1.0

  • reth-sw2 maps interface reth2.0 to reth3.0

All redundant Ethernet interfaces are configured for access mode. VLAN ID 10 is configured for the VLAN vlan-0 and the redundant Ethernet interfaces.

Note:

A specific VLAN ID or VLAN ID list must be configured for a VLAN.

Topology

Figure 6 shows the redundant Ethernet interface child links that are mapped in secure wire configurations reth-sw1 and reth-sw2. Each redundant Ethernet interface consists of two child interfaces, one on each node of the chassis cluster.

Figure 6: Secure Wire Redundant Ethernet Interface Child LinksSecure Wire Redundant Ethernet Interface Child Links

Users on upstream or downstream devices connected to the SRX Series cluster can configure redundant Ethernet interface child links in a LAG as long as the LAG does not span chassis cluster nodes. For example, ge-0/0/0 and ge-0/1/0 and ge-0/0/1 and ge-0/1/1 on node 0 can be configured as LAGs on connected devices. In the same way, ge-1/0/0 and ge-1/1/0 and ge-1/0/1 and ge-1/1/1 on node 1 can be configured as LAGs on connected devices.

Configuration

Procedure

CLI Quick Configuration

To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level, and then enter commit from configuration mode.

Step-by-Step Procedure

The following example requires you to navigate various levels in the configuration hierarchy. For instructions on how to do that, see Using the CLI Editor in Configuration Mode in the CLI User Guide.

To configure a secure wire mapping for aggregated interface member links:

  1. Configure the VLAN.

  2. Configure the redundant Ethernet interfaces.

  3. Configure the secure wire mappings.

  4. Configure security zones.

  5. Configure a security policy to permit traffic.

Results

From configuration mode, confirm your configuration by entering the show vlans, show interfaces, show security forwarding-options, and show security zones commands. If the output does not display the intended configuration, repeat the instructions in this example to correct the configuration.

If you are done configuring the device, enter commit from configuration mode.

Verification

Confirm that the configuration is working properly.

Verifying Secure Wire Mapping

Purpose

Verify the secure wire mapping.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show security forwarding-options secure-wire command.

Verifying VLAN

Purpose

Verify the VLAN.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show vlans vlan-0 command.