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MPLS on Provider and Provider Edge Devices Configuration

Configuring MPLS on Provider Switches

To implement MPLS, you must configure at least one provider switch as a transit switch for the MPLS packets.

MPLS requires the configuration of an interior gateway protocol (OSPF) and a signaling protocol (RSVP) on the core interfaces and the loopback interface of all the switches. This procedure includes the configuration of OSPF on the provider switch.

To configure the provider switch, complete the following tasks:

  1. Configure OSPF on the loopback and core interfaces:
    Note:

    You can use the switch address as an alternative to the loopback interface.

  2. Configure MPLS on the core interfaces:
  3. Configure RSVP on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
  4. Configure an IP address for the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
  5. Configure family mpls on the logical units of the core interfaces, thereby identifying the interfaces that will be used for forwarding MPLS packets:

Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge Switches

To implement MPLS, you must configure two provider edge (PE) switches—an ingress PE switch and an egress PE switch—and at least one provider switch. You can configure the customer edge (CE) interfaces on the PE switches of the MPLS network using IP over MPLS.

This topic describes how to configure an ingress PE switch and an egress PE switch using IP over MPLS:

Configuring the Ingress PE Switch

To configure the ingress PE switch:

  1. Configure an IP address for the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
    Note:

    You cannot use routed VLAN interfaces (RVIs) or Layer 3 subinterfaces as core interfaces.

  2. Configure OSPF on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
    Note:

    You can use the switch address as an alternative to the loopback interface.

  3. Configure OSPF traffic engineering:
  4. Configure RSVP on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
  5. Configure MPLS traffic engineering.
  6. Configure MPLS on the core interfaces:
  7. Configure family mpls on the logical units of the core interfaces, thereby identifying the interfaces that will be used for forwarding MPLS packets:
  8. Configure a customer edge interface as a Layer 3 routed interface, specifying an IP address:
  9. Configure this Layer 3 customer edge interface for the routing protocol:
  10. Configure an LSP on the ingress PE switch (192.168.10.1) to send IP packets over MPLS to the egress PE switch (192.168.12.1):
  11. Disable constrained-path LSP computation for this LSP:
  12. Configure a static route from the ingress PE switch to the egress PE switch, thereby indicating to the routing protocol that the packets will be forwarded over the MPLS LSP that has been set up to that destination:

Configuring the Egress PE Switch

To configure the egress PE switch:

  1. Configure an IP address for the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
    Note:

    You cannot use routed VLAN interfaces (RVIs) or Layer 3 subinterfaces as core interfaces.

  2. Configure OSPF on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
    Note:

    You can use the switch address as an alternative to the loopback interface.

  3. Configure RSVP on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
  4. Configure MPLS on the core interfaces:
  5. Configure family mpls on the logical units of the core interfaces, thereby identifying the interfaces that will be used for forwarding MPLS packets:
  6. Configure a customer edge interface as a Layer 3 routed interface, specifying an IP address:
  7. Configure this Layer 3 customer edge interface for the routing protocol:
  8. Configure an LSP on the egress PE switch (192.168.12.1) to send IP packets over MPLS to the ingress PE switch (192.168.10.1):
  9. Disable constrained-path LSP computation for this LSP:
  10. Configure a static route from the ingress PE switch to the egress PE switch, thereby indicating to the routing protocol that the packets will be forwarded over the MPLS LSP that has been set up to that destination:

Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge Switches Using IP-Over-MPLS

You can configure MPLS on EX Series switches to increase transport efficiency in your network. MPLS services can be used to connect various sites to a backbone network or to ensure better performance for low-latency applications such as VoIP and other business-critical functions.

To implement MPLS on switches, you must configure two provider edge (PE) switches—an ingress PE switch and an egress PE switch—and at least one provider switch. You can configure customer edge (CE) interfaces on the PE switches of the MPLS network by using either IP over MPLS or MPLS over circuit cross-connect (CCC).

The main differences between configuring IP over MPLS and configuring MPLS over CCC are that for IP over MLPS you configure the customer edge interfaces to belong to family inet (rather than family ccc) and you configure a static route for the label-switched path (LSP). The configuration of the provider switch is the same regardless of whether you have used IP over MPLS or MPLS over CCC. See Configuring MPLS on EX8200 and EX4500 Provider Switches.

This topic describes how to configure an ingress PE switch and an egress PE switch using IP over MPLS:

Configuring the Ingress PE Switch

To configure the ingress PE switch:

  1. Configure an IP address for the loopback interface and for the core interfaces:
  2. Configure OSPF on the loopback and core interfaces:
    Note:

    If you want to use routed VLAN interfaces (RVIs) or Layer 3 subinterfaces as the core interfaces, replace ge-0/0/5.0 and ge-0/0/6 each with an RVI name (for example, vlan.logical-interface-number) or a subinterface name (for example, interface-name.logical-unit-number).

    RVIs function as logical routers, eliminating the need to have both a switch and a router. Layer 3 subinterfaces allow you to route traffic among multiple VLANs along a single trunk line that connects an EX Series switch to a Layer 2 switch.

  3. Enable traffic engineering for the routing protocol:
  4. Configure RSVP on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
  5. Configure MPLS traffic engineering:
  6. Configure MPLS on the core interfaces:
  7. Configure family mpls on the logical units of the core interfaces, thereby identifying the interfaces that will be used for forwarding MPLS packets:
  8. Configure a customer edge interface as a Layer 3 routed interface, specifying an IP address:
  9. Configure this Layer 3 customer edge interface for the routing protocol:
  10. Configure an LSP on the ingress PE switch (100.100.100.100) to send IP packets over MPLS to the egress PE switch (208.208.208.208):
  11. Disable constrained-path LSP computation for this LSP:
  12. Configure a static route from the ingress PE switch to the egress PE switch, thereby indicating to the routing protocol that the packets will be forwarded over the MPLS LSP that has been set up to that destination:
    Note:

    Do not configure a static route if you are using this procedure to configure an MPLS-based Layer 3 VPN.

Configuring the Egress PE Switch

To configure the egress PE switch:

  1. Configure an IP address for the loopback interface and for the core interfaces:
  2. Configure OSPF on the loopback interface (or switch address) and core interfaces:
    Note:

    If you want to use routed VLAN interfaces (RVIs) or Layer 3 subinterfaces as the core interfaces, replace ge-0/0/5.0 and ge-0/0/6 each with an RVI name (for example, vlan.logical-interface-number) or a subinterface name (for example, interface-name.logical-unit-number).

    RVIs function as logical routers, eliminating the need to have both a switch and a router. Layer 3 subinterfaces allow you to route traffic among multiple VLANs along a single trunk line that connects an EX Series switch to a Layer 2 switch.

  3. Enable traffic engineering for the routing protocol:
  4. Configure RSVP on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
  5. Configure MPLS traffic engineering on both BGP and IGP destinations:
  6. Configure MPLS on the core interfaces:
  7. Configure family mpls on the logical units of the core interfaces, thereby identifying the interfaces that will be used for forwarding MPLS packets:
  8. Configure a customer edge interface as a Layer 3 routed interface, specifying an IP address:
  9. Configure this Layer 3 customer edge interface for the routing protocol:
  10. Configure an LSP on the egress PE switch (208.208.208.208) to send IP packets over MPLS to the ingress PE switch (100.100.100.100):
  11. Disable constrained-path LSP computation for this LSP:
  12. Configure a static route from the ingress PE switch to the egress PE switch, thereby indicating to the routing protocol that the packets will be forwarded over the MPLS LSP that has been set up to that destination:
    Note:

    Do not configure a static route if you are using this procedure to configure an MPLS-based Layer 3 VPN.

Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge EX8200 and EX4500 Switches Using Circuit Cross-Connect

Junos OS MPLS for EX8200 and EX4500 switches supports Layer 2 protocols and Layer 2 virtual private networks (VPNs). You can configure MPLS on switches to increase transport efficiency in your network. MPLS services can be used to connect various sites to a backbone network and to ensure better performance for low-latency applications such as VoIP and other business-critical functions.

This topic describes configuring provider edge (PE) switches in an MPLS network using a circuit cross-connect (CCC). The customer edge interface can be either a simple interface or a tagged VLAN interface.

Note:

If you are configuring a CCC on a tagged VLAN interface, you do not specify family ccc. See Configuring an MPLS-Based VLAN CCC Using a Layer 2 VPN and Configuring an MPLS-Based VLAN CCC Using a Layer 2 Circuit.

Note:

If you are going through this procedure in preparation for configuring an MPLS-based Layer 2 VPN, you do not need to configure the association of the label-switched path (LSP) with the customer edge interface. The BGP signaling automates the connections, so manual configuration of the connections is not required.

The following guidelines apply to CCC configurations:

  • When an interface is configured to belong to family ccc, it cannot belong to any other family.

  • You can send any kind of traffic over a CCC, including nonstandard bridge protocol data units (BPDUs) generated by other vendors’ equipment.

  • If you are configuring a CCC on a tagged VLAN interface, you must explicitly enable VLAN tagging and specify a VLAN ID. The VLAN ID cannot be configured on logical interface unit 0. The logical unit number must be 1 or higher. See Configuring an MPLS-Based VLAN CCC Using a Layer 2 VPN and Configuring an MPLS-Based VLAN CCC Using a Layer 2 Circuit.

This procedure shows how to set up two CCCs:

  • If you are configuring a CCC on a simple interface (ge-0/0/1), you do not need to enable VLAN tagging or specify a VLAN ID, so you skip those steps.

  • If you are configuring a CCC on a tagged VLAN interface (ge-0/0/2), include all the steps in this procedure.

To configure a PE switch with a CCC:

  1. Configure OSPF (or IS-IS) on the loopback (or switch address) and core interfaces:
  2. Enable traffic engineering for the routing protocol:
  3. Configure an IP address for the loopback interface and for the core interfaces:
  4. Enable MPLS and define the LSP:
    Tip:

    lsp_to_pe2_ge1 is the LSP name. You will need to use the specified name again when configuring the CCC.

  5. Configure MPLS on the core interfaces:
  6. Configure RSVP on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
  7. Configure family mpls on the logical units of the core interfaces:
    Note:

    You can enable family mpls on either individual interfaces or aggregated Ethernet interfaces. You cannot enable it on tagged VLAN interfaces.

  8. If you are configuring a CCC on a tagged VLAN interface, enable VLAN tagging on the customer edge interface ge-0/0/2 of the local PE switch:

    If you are configuring a CCC on a simple interface (ge-0/0/1), omit this step.

  9. If you are configuring a CCC on a tagged VLAN interface, configure the logical unit of the customer edge interface with a VLAN ID:

    If you are configuring a CCC on a simple interface (ge-0/0/1), omit this step.

  10. Configure the logical unit of the customer edge interface to belong to family ccc:
    • On a simple interface:

    • On a tagged VLAN interface:

  11. Associate the CCC interface with two LSPs, one for transmitting MPLS packets and the other for receiving MPLS packets:
    Note:

    If you are configuring a Layer 2 VPN, omit this step. The BGP signaling automates the connections, so manual configuration of the connections is not required.

    • On a simple interface:

    • On a tagged VLAN interface:

    Tip:

    The transmit-lsp option specifies the LSP name that was configured on PE-1 (the local PE switch) by the label-switched-path statement within the [edit protocols mpls] hierarchy.

    The receive-lsp option specifies the LSP name that was configured on PE-2 (the remote PE switch) by the label-switched-path statement within the [edit protocols mpls] hierarchy.

When you have completed configuring one PE switch, follow the same procedures to configure the other PE switch.

Configuring MPLS on EX8200 and EX4500 Provider Switches

You can configure MPLS on EX8200 and EX4500 switches to increase transport efficiency in your network. MPLS services can be used to connect various sites to a backbone network and to ensure better performance for low-latency applications such as VoIP and other business-critical functions.

To implement MPLS on EX Series switches, you must configure at least one provider switch as a transit switch for the MPLS packets. The configuration of all the provider switches remains the same regardless of whether the provider edge (PE) switches are using circuit cross-connect (CCC) or using MPLS over IP for the customer edge interfaces. Likewise, you do not need to change the configuration of the provider switches if you implement an MPLS-based Layer 2 VPN, Layer 3 VPN, or a Layer 2 circuit configuration.

MPLS requires the configuration of a routing protocol (OSPF or IS-IS) on the core interfaces and the loopback interface of all the switches. This procedure includes the configuration of OSPF on the provider switch. For information on configuring IS-IS as the routing protocol, see Junos OS Routing Protocols Configuration Guide.

To configure the provider switch, complete the following tasks:

  1. Enable the routing protocol (OSPF or IS-IS) on the loopback interface and on the core interfaces:
    Note:

    You can use the switch address as an alternative to the loopback interface.

  2. Enable traffic engineering for the routing protocol (traffic engineering must be explicitly enabled for OSPF):
  3. Enable MPLS within the protocols stanza and apply it to the core interfaces:
  4. Configure RSVP on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
  5. Configure an IP address for the loopback interface and for the core interfaces:
  6. Configure family mpls on the logical units of the core interfaces:
    Note:

    You can enable family mpls on either individual interfaces or aggregated Ethernet interfaces. You cannot enable it on tagged VLAN interfaces.