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Per-Unit Queuing and Hierarchical Queuing for MIC and MPC Interfaces

Queuing Models Supported for MIC and MPC Interfaces

Interfaces hosted on Modular Interface Card (MIC) and Modular Port Concentrator (MPC) line cards in MX Series 5G Universal Routing Platforms support the following models of class-of-service (CoS) queuing, depending on MIC or MPC type:

Limited Scale Per-Unit Queuing MPCs

Per-unit CoS queuing features on a limited scale are supported for interfaces hosted on some MPCs that do not have a dedicated queuing chip, specifically the MPC3E, MPC4E, MPC5E, and MPC6E line cards and on the fixed-configuration 16-port 10-Gigabit Ethernet MPC in MX240, MX480, MX960, MX2010, and MX2020 routers.

Note:

The nonqueuing MPC1 and MPC2 line cards do not support per-unit queuing.

On MPCs that support per-unit queuing, the following queuing capabilities are available:

  • Four or eight egress queues per unit.

  • Delay buffer capacities of 100 ms by default, and up to 200 ms maximum delay.

  • Rate shaping of the ports and their queues.

  • Guaranteed rate enforced at the queues.

The per-unit CoS queuing features also support pre-classification of incoming packets to protect high priority packets in the event of congestion. Such features include ingress DSCP rewrite and per-VLAN classification, ingress and egress policing, and rewrites.

Hierarchical Queuing MICs and MPCs

Hierarchical CoS queuing features are supported on interfaces hosted on MICs in MPC1 Q, MPC2 Q, MPC2 EQ, MPC5EQ, MPC7E, MPC8E, and MPC9E line cards in MX204, MX240, MX480, MX960, MX2010, MX2020, and MX10003 routers and for interfaces hosted on 1-Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet MICs in MX5, MX10, MX40, MX80, or MX104 modular chassis routers. These MICs and MPCs provide a dedicated queuing chip that supports hierarchical queuing.

Hierarchical queuing MICs and MPCs support all per-unit queuing functionality plus fine-grained queuing abilities over four or five levels of hierarchical scheduling:

  • Hierarchical scheduling with ports, interface sets, and logical interfaces.

  • Shaping—Committed Information Rate (CIR) and a peak information rate (PIR)—at all scheduling levels, including queues.

  • Three normal- priority levels and two excess- priority levels configurable at all scheduling levels, including queues.

  • Per-priority shaping of traffic at Level 1 or Level 2.

  • Shaping for unconfigured customer VLANs (C-VLANs) and for service VLANs (S-VLANs).

Scheduler Node Levels for MIC and MPC Interfaces

Interfaces hosted on MICs and MPCs support different scheduler node levels, depending on MIC or MPC type:

Scheduler Node Levels for Per-Unit Queuing MPCs

For an interface hosted on a per-unit queuing MPC, each logical interface has its own dedicated level 3 node, and all logical interfaces share a common level 2 node (one per port).

Figure 1 illustrates scheduler node levels for an interface hosted on a per-unit queuing MPC.

Figure 1: Scheduler Node Levels for Per-Unit Queuing MPCsScheduler Node Levels for Per-Unit Queuing MPCs

For interfaces hosted on per-unit queuing MPCs, the level 2 node is always a dummy node.

Scheduler Node Levels for Hierarchical Queuing MICs and MPCs

With the exception of the 10-Gigabit Ethernet MPC with SFP+, the queuing model used by interfaces hosted on hierarchical queuing MICs and MPCs supports up to five levels of scheduler nodes: the queue itself (level 5), session logical interface (ppp or dhcp) (level 4), customer VLAN (C-VLAN) (level 3), the interface set or service VLAN (S-VLAN) collection (level 2), and the physical interface or port (level 1).

Figure 2 illustrates the scheduler node levels for an interface hosted on a hierarchical queuing MIC or MPC.

Figure 2: Scheduler Node Levels for Interfaces on Hierarchical Queuing and Scheduling MICs and MPCsScheduler Node Levels for Interfaces on Hierarchical Queuing and Scheduling MICs and MPCs

The figure depicts scheduler nodes for an interface that does not include interface sets and for which traffic control profiles are applied to the logical interfaces only.

Note:

If an interface set has a CoS scheduling policy but none of its child logical interfaces has a CoS scheduling policy, then the interface set is considered to be a leaf node and has one level 2 and one level 3 node.