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    Preparing the Traffic Data

    1. Following is a simple example of the required traffic data file format. It shows a clipping from a file that includes two samples, spaced roughly 5 minutes apart.
      #RouterIP,InterfaceName,inBitsPerSec,outBitsPerSec
      StartTime:Wed Jan 15 19:49:48 EST 2003
      EndTime:Wed Jan 15 19:54:47 EST 2003
      
      162.51.225.1,Ethernet0,45,50 162.51.225.1,GigabitEthernet4/0,105330704,21984624
      StartTime:Wed Jan 15 19:54:47 EST 2003 EndTime:Wed Jan 15 19:59:47 EST 2003
      162.51.225.1,Ethernet0,50,46 162.51.225.1,GigabitEthernet4/0,114779210,21764904 ...
    2. Each sample begins with a “StartTime” and “EndTime”, followed by a list of router interfaces and their incoming and outgoing traffic in bits per second. The following explains the format for each sample in detail:

      The first line of each sample begins with the keyword "StartTime:", followed by the date and time in the following format:

      "DDD#MMM#dd#HH:mm:SS#ZZZ#YYYY"
      where #=<space>,D=Day, M=Month, d=date, H=hour, m=minute, S=seconds, Z=TimeZone,
      Y=year

      The second line of each sample begins with the keyword "EndTime:", followed by the date and time in the same format as above.

      All interfaces/tunnels are then listed with four comma-separated fields per entry.

      For interfaces, the format is:

      <IP Address>, <Interface Name>,<In bits per second>,<Out bits per second>

      For tunnels, the format is:

      <IP Address>, <Tunnel ID>, <Out bits per second>

      Field

      Description

      <IP Address>

      The IP address enables IP/MPLSView to map the entry to the corresponding source router by doing a look-up in the interface map (intfmap) file. For interfaces, the IP address is often the Loopback address of the router, but it may be the IP address of any interface in the router as long as it is present in the interface map (intfmap) file. This file is automatically generated when the router configuration files are parsed.

      <Interface Name>

      For interfaces only, this is the equivalent of the SNMP variable “ifDescr” that holds the “interface description”. These interface descriptions should also match the interface names in the interface map (intfmap) file.

      <In bits per second>

      For tunnels only, the Tunnel ID should match the tunnel ID in the tunnel file. The tunnel file, containing all tunnel definitions in the network, is automatically created when the config files are parsed.

      <In bits per second>

      This is the Ingress traffic rate in bits per second.

      <Out bits per second>

      This is the Egress traffic rate in bits per second.


    Organizing Your Traffic Samples


    These samples can be spread out in multiple files in a special directory. One recommended way of organizing them is by creating one file per router per day, where that file contains only the daily traffic samples associated with that router’s interfaces. You can also create subdirectories in order to categorize the traffic by particular days, weeks, etc. Use a meaningful naming scheme for the files, incorporating the router name or IP address.

    Modified: 2016-11-08