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    Host Discovery

    The Host Discovery task can be used for several purposes.

    One use is to determine the valid IP addresses in a range of IP addresses. Given a profile where each entry can contain ranges of IP addresses, this task can be used to create a new router profile with only the valid host entries found within those specified IP address ranges. Note that the host discovery task can also discover devices other than routers and switches, such as servers, PCs, and printers, if they have SNMP enabled. If you wish to include these devices in your network model, you should select Create dummy nodes for unrecognized files” when running the Scheduling Live Network Task using the router profile resulting from this Host Discovery task, as explained in Chapter 7, Live Network Collection .

    Another use of the Host Discovery task is to autodiscover new devices recursively from a set of seed routers in a router profile, with 3 levels of recursion, based on ARP information.

    The Host Discovery task can also be used to determine which entries of a router profile are valid. Given an existing router profile, this task can be used to create a new router profile with only the existing router profile’s valid entries.

    For more details on the other options available for Host Discovery, refer to Host Discovery.

    There are several vendor-specific tasks, including Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) and Alcatel SAM Collection. These tasks require a license. For more details, see Chapter 19, Reference.

    For information on VLAN Discovery, see Chapter 6, VLAN Discovery .

    Discovery from a Range of IP Addresses

    1. To discover routers from a range of IP addresses, first create a new row in a router profile to specify the range. Instead of specifying a single IP address in the IP address field, you can specify a range of IP addresses within brackets. For example, “10.1.1.[1-10]” would include the addresses from 10.1.1.1 to 10.1.1.10, and “10.1.[1-2].[1-10]” would include the addresses from 10.1.1.1 to 10.1.1.10 and 10.1.2.1 to 10.1.2.10. For the router name column, enter a name for this range of addresses.
    2. After creating the router profile entry, create a new task for “Host Discovery.”
    3. In the Profile Selection tab, select the router profile containing the IP addresses and IP address ranges that you want to ping for valid devices. Then select the appropriate rows and add them to the “Routers to be collected” list on the right. Under Data Collector Option, select “Merge with existing IP/MPLSView files” to update or add to the existing IP/MPLSView files with new node and interface data.
    4. Click the Discovery Options tab. For the Generated result profile, press Browse and enter a name for the new router profile such as “HostDiscoveryProfile”. It’s recommended to save into the directory /u/wandl/data/.TaskManager/profile, so that the profile should be visible from the Router Profiles window after the discovery is completed. Otherwise the default directory and profile name is saved to /tmp/hostDiscoveredProfile.
    5. Next to Generated result output file, enter in a filename, for example, “HostDiscoveryOutput”, which will indicate for troubleshooting purposes, the IP addresses that were unreachable, and those that were reachable but undiscoverable. The default directory and output file name is saved to /tmp/hostDiscoverOutput.
    6. Click Next to schedule the task immediately and then click Finish.
    7. After the discovery is completed, click the Router Profile button to view the newly created profile.
    8. For more details on the other options available for Host Discovery, see Host Discovery.

    Crawl the Network (Autodiscovery)

    For autodiscovery based on ARP, create a router profile for the seed routers. The minimal parameters to specify are the IP address, node names, and SNMP parameters (version, community string, etc.).

    Create a Host Discovery Task, choose the seed routers as the devices to be collected, and then click the Crawl the network from the selected devices option in the Discovery Options tab. Also in the Discovery Options tab, fill in the name for the generated profile resulted from the host discovery so that a router profile consisting all the host discovered by this task will be created.

    The output of the task can either be merged into current live network or saved as a separated network file (specification file) depending on what you choose in the Data Collector Option on the Collection Options tab.

    Cleaning Up an Existing Router Profile

    The following is an example of creating a router profile based on a previous router profile generated from an autodiscovery task.

    1. Create a new task for “Host Discovery.”
    2. In the Profile Selection tab, select the existing router profile created during the autodiscovery, for example, Autodiscovery.ospf. Select all the rows and add them to the “Routers to be collected” list on the right.
    3. Click the Discovery Options tab. For the Generated result profile field, enter a file name for the new router profile and for the Generated result output file field, enter in a filename for a report of the unreachable or undiscoverable IP addresses.
    4. Click Next to schedule the task immediately and then click Finish.
    5. After the discovery is completed, click the Router Profile button and select the newly created router profile. Check the number of router profiles displayed to see how many routers of the original profile were reachable and discoverable.

    There are several vendor-specific tasks, including Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) and Alcatel SAM Collection. These tasks require a license. For more details, see Reference.

    For information on VLAN Discovery, see VLAN Discovery.

    Modified: 2015-12-29