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Load an Initial Configuration on a vSRX with VMware

Starting in Junos OS Release 15.1X49-D40 and Junos OS Release 17.3R1, you can use a mounted ISO image to pass the initial startup Junos OS configuration to a vSRX VM. This ISO image contains a file in the root directory called juniper.conf. The configuration file uses curly brackets ({) and indentation to display the hierarchical structure of the configuration. Terminating or leaf statements in the configuration hierarchy are displayed with a trailing semicolon (;) to define configuration details, such as root password, management IP address, default gateway, and other configuration statements.

Note:

The juniper.conf file must be in the format same as displayed using show configuration command and it cannot be in set command format.

The process to bootstrap a vSRX VM with an ISO configuration image is as follows:

  1. Create the juniper.conf configuration file with your Junos OS configuration.

    An example of a juniper.conf file follows.

  2. Create an ISO image that includes the juniper.conf file.

  3. Mount the ISO image to the vSRX VM.

  4. Boot or reboot the vSRX VM. vSRX will boot using the juniper.conf file included in the mounted ISO image.

  5. Unmount the ISO image from the vSRX VM. To unmount the ISO image see Dismount ISO Image from VM.

Note:

If you do not unmount the ISO image after the initial boot or reboot, all subsequent configuration changes to the vSRX are overwritten by the ISO image on the next reboot.

Create a vSRX Bootstrap ISO Image

This task uses a Linux system to create the ISO image.

To create a vSRX bootstrap ISO image:

  1. Create a configuration file in plaintext with the Junos OS command syntax and save in a file called juniper.conf.
  2. Create a new directory.
  3. Copy juniper.conf to the new ISO directory.
    Note:

    The juniper.conf file must contain the full vSRX configuration. The ISO bootstrap process overwrites any existing vSRX configuration.

  4. Use the Linux mkisofs command to create the ISO image.
    Note:

    The -l option allows for a long filename.

Upload an ISO Image to a VMWare Datastore

To upload an ISO image to a datastore:

  1. On the VMware vSphere Web Client, select the datastore you want to upload the file to.
  2. Select the folder where you want to store the file and click Upload a File from the task bar.
  3. Browse to the file on your local computer and click Upload.

Optionally, refresh the datastore to see the new file.

Provision vSRX with an ISO Bootstrap Image on VMWare

To provision a vSRX VM with an ISO bootstrap image:

  1. From VMware vSphere client, select the host server where the vSRX VM resides.
  2. Right-click the vSRX VM and select Edit Settings. The Edit Setting dialogue box appears.
  3. Select the Hardware tab and click Add. The Add Hardware dialog box opens.
  4. Select the CD/DVD drive and click Next.
  5. Select Use ISO image and click Next.
  6. Click Datastore ISO File, browse to your boostrap ISO image, and click Next.
  7. Click Next and Finish to save this setting.
  8. Click OK to save this CD drive to the VM.
  9. Right-click the vSRX VM and select Power>Power On to boot the vSRX VM.
  10. After the vSRX boots, verify the configuration and then select Power> Power down to shut down the vSRX so you can remove the ISO image.
  11. Select the CD/DVD drive from the Hardware tab in the VMWare vSphere client.
  12. Select the CD drive for the ISO file and click Remove to remove your boostrap ISO image.
  13. Click OK to save this setting.
  14. Right-click the vSRX VM and select Power>Power On to boot the vSRX VM.
Release History Table
Release
Description
15.1X49-D80
Starting in Junos OS Release 15.1X49-D40 and Junos OS Release 17.3R1, you can use a mounted ISO image to pass the initial startup Junos OS configuration to a vSRX VM. This ISO image contains a file in the root directory called juniper.conf. The configuration file uses curly brackets ({) and indentation to display the hierarchical structure of the configuration. Terminating or leaf statements in the configuration hierarchy are displayed with a trailing semicolon (;) to define configuration details, such as root password, management IP address, default gateway, and other configuration statements.