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PTP Profiles

SUMMARY A profile contains PTP configuration options that are applicable only to a specific application.

Configure PTP Default Profile

You can configure the primary clock and the client clock for Precision Time Protocol (PTP) to help synchronize clocks in a distributed system. This time synchronization is achieved through packets that are transmitted and received in a session between the primary clock and the client clock. The default profile is enabled by default. You do not need to enable the profile-type statement to use the default profile.

Configure PTP and its Options

This topic includes the following tasks:

Configure PTP Options

To configure PTP options:

  1. In configuration mode, go to the [edit protocols ptp] hierarchy level:
  2. Configure the clock mode as either boundary or ordinary. This attribute is mandatory and has no default value.

    The boundary option signifies that the clock can be both a primary clock and a client clock. The ordinary option signifies that the clock is either a primary clock or a client clock.

  3. Configure the PTP domain option with values from 0 through 127. The default value is 0.
  4. Configure the priority1 option with values from 0 through 255. The default value is 128.

    The priority1 value determines the best primary clock. The priority1-value is also advertised in the primary clock’s announce message to other slaves.

  5. Configure the priority2 option with values from 0 through 255. The default value is 128.

    The priority2 value differentiates and prioritizes the primary clock to avoid confusion when priority1-value is the same for different primary clocks in a network.

  6. Configure the multicast-mode option to enable multicast transport.

Configure Member Clock Options

Configure the following options after the aforementioned PTP options have been set.

  1. Configure the client clock.
  2. (Optional) Configure the delay-request option in the client node with values from –7 through 7. The default value is 0.

    The delay request value is the logarithmic mean interval in seconds between the delay request messages sent by the client to the primary.

  3. Configure the interface for the client.
  4. Configure the multicast-mode option for the client. You can set this option when PTP multicast mode of messaging is needed.
  5. Configure the transport option in multicast mode as IPv4.

    The encapsulation type for PTP packet transport is IPv4.

  6. Configure the IP address of the local logical interface.

Configure Primary Clock Options

Configure the following options after the aforementioned PTP options and client clock options have been set.

  1. Configure the primary clock.
  2. Configure the delay-req-timeout option for the primary.

    The maximum timeout for delay request messages is between 30 and 300 seconds. We recommend 30 seconds.

  3. Configure the interface for the primary.
  4. Configure the multicast-mode option for the primary. You can set this option when PTP multicast mode of messaging is needed.
  5. Configure the transport option in multicast mode as IPv4.

    The encapsulation type for PTP packet transport is IPv4.

  6. Configure the IP address of the interface acting as the local PTP primary port.
  7. Configure the interface to be used to connect with the PTP reference clock.

    If the primary clock connection is through a 1-Gigabit Ethernet interface, configure the ptp0 interface.

    This interface is named ptp0 by default.

  8. Configure the multicast-mode option for the PTP reference clock interface. You can set this option when PTP multicast mode of messaging is needed.
  9. Configure the transport option in multicast mode as IPv4.

    The encapsulation type for PTP packet transport is IPv4.

G.8275.1 Telecom Profile

G.8275.1 is a PTP profile for applications that require accurate phase and time synchronization. It supports the architecture defined in ITU-T G.8275 to enable the distribution of phase and time with full timing support and is based on the second version of PTP defined in IEEE 1588. You can configure the G.8275.1 profile by including the profile-type g.8275.1 statement at the [edit protocols ptp] hierarchy level. ACX710, ACX2100, and ACX2200 routers support G.8275.1 Telecom Profile.

Note:

If you don’t configure a profile, the device operates in IEEE1588v2 profile which is the default profile.

The following sections give a brief overview about the types of clocks supported in the G.8275.1 profile and about the Alternate BMCA:

Types of Clocks Supported in the G.8275.1 Profile

There are two types of clocks supported in this profile, the ordinary clock and the boundary clock.

There are two types of ordinary clocks:

  • One that can be only a reference clock (T-GM)

  • One that can be only a client clock (a client-only ordinary clock or T-TSC)

There are two types of boundary clocks:

  • One that can be only a reference clock (T-GM )

  • One that can become a primary clock and a client clock to another PTP clock (T-BC)

Note:

MX Series routers support the TSC and TBC clock types.

Alternate BMCA

The G.8275.1 profile uses an alternate Best Master Clock Algorithm (BMCA). The alternate BMCA allows:

  • A new per-port attribute named notSlave. The notSlave port attribute is implemented using the protocols ptp master stanza configuration.

  • Multiple active reference clocks.

  • Per-port attribute local-priority to be used as a tie-breaker in the dataset comparison algorithm.

Configure G.8275.1 Profile

You can configure the G.8275.1 PTP profile for applications requiring accurate phase and time synchronization. It supports the architecture defined in ITU-T G.8275 to enable the distribution of phase and time with full timing support and is based on the second version of PTP defined in [IEEE 1588].

To configure the G8275.1 profile:

  1. In configuration mode, go to the [edit protocols ptp] hierarchy level:
  2. Configure the G.8275.1 profile.
  3. Configure the clock mode as either boundary or ordinary.

    The boundary option signifies that the clock can be both a primary clock and a client clock. The ordinary option signifies that the clock is either a primary clock or a client clock.

  4. Configure the PTP domain option with values from 24 through 43. The default value is 24.
  5. Configure the priority2 option with values from 0 through 255. The default value is 128.

    The priority2 value differentiates and prioritizes the primary clock to avoid confusion when priority1-value is the same for different primary clocks in a network.

  6. Configure stateful interface for boundary clock mode of operation.
    Note:

    For the configuration to work, the interface you specify must be configured at the [edit interfaces interface-name] hierarchy level.

  7. Configure multicast transmission of Precision Time Protocol (PTP) packets.
  8. Configure the local-priority option. This attribute to be used as a tie-breaker in the dataset comparison algorithm, in the event that all other previous attributes of the datasets being compared are equal.
  9. Specify the encapsulation type for PTP packet transport as Ethernet or IEEE 802.3.
  10. Specify the asymmetry value.

After you have configured the PTP G.8275.1 profile, enter the commit command from configuration mode.

G.8275.2 Enhanced Profile

The Precision Time Protocol (PTP) G.8275.2 enhanced profile supports telecom applications that require accurate phase and time synchronization for phase alignment and time of day synchronization over a wide area network. This profile supports partial timing support (PTS) using PTP over IPv4 and IPv6 unicast, ordinary and boundary clocks, and unicast negotiation with single and multiple TLVs support on the primary port.

With the G.8275.2 enhanced profile, you can use either boundary or ordinary clocks. Up to 512 downstream client clocks are supported. Client clock ports can recover clocks from one-step or two-step primary clocks, but primary clocks only support one-step PTP.

The G.8275.2 enhanced profile includes the following functionality:

  • Support for both ordinary clocks and boundary clocks.

  • Support for primary-only and client-only ports.

  • Support for node types T-BC-P (BC) and T-TSC-P (OC/BC).

  • Support for the alternate best primary clock algorithm.

  • Support for PTP with or without VLAN encapsulation and for two-way transfer. Unicast PTP over IPv4 transport is required.

  • Unicast negotiation with single and multiple TLVs support on the primary port. The primary accepts single and multiple TLV messages from the remote client for request, cancel, and ack messages. The primary responds with single or multiple TLV messages as appropriate. The “rate” TLV is ignored.

  • Reception and transmission of unicast Announce and Sync PTP packets.

  • Support for full domain and packet-rate ranges.

  • Support for manual mode, rather than unicast negotiation.

  • Support for aggregated Ethernet interfaces.

    You can configure an aggregated Ethernet interface and its configured IP address for PTP streams acting as slaves or primaries. IP hashing determines which physical link to use for the PTP traffic flows. Both IPv4 unicast and IPv6 unicast transport are supported.

    Note that the QFX5120-48T switch does not support G.8275.2.enh profile over aggregated Ethernet interfaces.

  • Support for loopback interface.

    You can configure a loopback interface (there is only one loopback interface, and it is lo0.0) and its corresponding IP addresses for PTP streams acting as slaves or primaries. The IP address configured on lo0.0 is used as the local IP address in the PTP configuration statements, and the remote primary or client IP address is used to identify the destination forwarding direction. You can configure multiple IP addresses on lo0.0, which allows different unique PTP streams to co-exist on lo0.0. Although, the loopback interface is the same for both primaries and slaves, the IP addresses must be unique. Both IPv4 unicast and IPv6 unicast transport are supported.

    Note that the QFX5120-48T switch does not support G.8275.2.enh profile over loopback interface.

With the G.8275.2 enhanced profile enabled, the following parameters can apply:

  • Priority1

    The allowed (and default) value is 128. (Not user-configurable.)

  • Priority2

    The range is from 0 to 255, and the default value is 128.

  • Domain number

    The range is from 44 to 63, and the default value is 44.

  • Clock mode

    The clock mode can be ordinary or boundary.

  • Duration of negotiated rates

    The range is 60 to 1000 seconds, and the default value is 300 seconds.

  • clockAccuracy

    0xFE

  • offsetScaledLogVariance

    0xFFFF

  • slaveOnly

    The allowed values are True and False; the default value is False. (Not user-configurable; the value is set according to the setting of the clock mode: boundary or ordinary.)

  • localPriority

    The range is 1 to 255; the default value is 128.

  • Table 1: Announce, Sync, and Delay Request/ Response Rate Parameters

    Parameter

    Default Value

    Allowed Range of Values

    Announce rate

    0

    • Primary: -3 to 4

    • Client: -3 to 0

    Delay request/response rate

    -6

    • Client: -7 to -3

    Sync rate

    -6

    • Primary: -7 to 4

    • Client: -7 to -3

Configure G.8275.2 Enhanced Profile

Note:

When you enable the G.8275.2 enhanced profile, you cannot enable any other profile.

Configure PTP and Its Options

This topic includes the following tasks:

Configure PTP Options

To configure PTP options:

  1. In configuration mode, go to the [edit protocols ptp] hierarchy level:
  2. Configure the clock mode as either boundary or ordinary. This attribute is mandatory and has no default value.

    The boundary option signifies that both primary and client must be configured. The ordinary option signifies that only the primary, or only the client, must be configured.

  3. Configure the profile type as g.8275.2.enh (the G.8275.2.enh profile type provides the telecom profile). This attribute is mandatory.
  4. (Optional) Configure the PTP domain option with a value from 44 through 63. The default value is 44.
  5. (Optional) Configure the priority2 option with values from 0 through 255. The default value is 128.

    The priority2 value differentiates and prioritizes the primary clock to avoid confusion when priority1-value is the same for different primary clocks in a network.

  6. Configure the unicast-negotiation option.

    Unicast negotiation is a method by which the announce, sync, and delay response packet rates are negotiated between the primary clock and the client clock before a PTP session is established.

    Note:

    Unicast negotiation, when enabled, does not allow you to commit any packet rate–related configuration.

Configure Member Clock Options

Configure the following options after the aforementioned PTP options have been set.

  1. Configure the client clock.
  2. (Optional) Configure the delay-request option in the client node. The range is -7 to -3 seconds, and the default values are -6 for the primary and -7 for the client.

    The delay request value is the logarithmic mean interval in seconds between the delay request messages sent by the client to the primary.

  3. Configure the interface for the client.
    Note:

    You can configure an aggregated Ethernet interface and its configured IP address for PTP streams acting as slaves or primaries.

    For example, to configure a client using an aggregated Ethernet interface:

    Note:

    You can configure a loopback interface (there is only one loopback interface, and it is lo0.0) and its corresponding IP addresses for PTP streams acting as slaves or primaries. Although the loopback interface is the same for both primaries and slaves, the IP addresses must be unique.

    For example, to configure a client using the loopback interface:

  4. Configure the unicast-mode option for the client.
  5. Configure the transport option in unicast mode as IPv4 or IPv6.
  6. Configure the clock source and the IP address of the interface acting as the local PTP client port.
    Note:

    You must configure this IP address at the [edit interfaces interface-name] hierarchy level.

  7. (Optional) Configure the priority assigned to the interface acting as the local PTP client port.

Configure Primary Clock Options

Configure the following options after the aforementioned PTP options and client clock options have been set.

  1. Configure the primary clock.
  2. Configure the interface for the primary.
    Note:

    You can configure an aggregated Ethernet interface and its configured IP address for PTP streams acting as slaves or primaries.

    For example, to configure a primary using an aggregated Ethernet interface:

    Note:

    You can configure a loopback interface (there is only one loopback interface, and it is lo0.0) and its corresponding IP addresses for PTP streams acting as slaves or primaries. Although the loopback interface is the same for both primaries and slaves, the IP addresses must be unique.

    For example, to configure a primary using the loopback interface:

  3. Configure the unicast mode option for the primary.
  4. Configure the transport option in unicast mode as IPv4 or IPv6.
  5. Configure the remote clock source and the IP address of the interface acting as the primary.

PTP Enterprise Profile

The enterprise profile is based on Precision Time Protocol (PTPv1) as defined in IEEE 1588-2002. This profile was designed to distribute system time of day (TOD) and clock frequency from a grand primary clock to client clocks within the same network and clock domain, and to use multicast communications. The enterprise profile PTPv2 is not backwards compatible with PTPv1.

With the enterprise profile, you can use either boundary or ordinary clocks. Up to 512 downstream client clocks are supported. Member clock ports can recover clocks from one-step or two-step primary clocks, but primary clocks only support one-step PTP.

The enterprise profile supports PTP over IPv4 and UDP encapsulation, which includes the following functionality:

  • Reception and transmission of Multicast Announce and Sync PTP packets.

  • Reception of multicast or unicast Delay Request packets for the primary clock interfaces.

    The Delay Response is sent with the same multicast or unicast transmission to match the request.

  • Transmission of unicast Delay Request packets for the client clock interfaces.

    The switch will not transmit Multicast Delay Request packets.

  • IPv4 Multicast address of 224.0.1.129 for PTP.

  • PTP Interfaces can be trunk or access ports, so the traffic might or might not be part of a VLAN.

The enterprise profile supports dynamic primary clock interface and client clock interface detection as Announce and Delay Request packets are received and supports the following functionality:

  • Streams are identified by the clock identity, rather than the IP address.

  • Up to four remote primary clocks that use the best primary clock (BMC) algorithm to select the clock source.

  • Up to 512 remote client clocks with up to 64 logical interfaces.

  • Remote devices are ignored when the number of primary and client clocks has reach the limit.

    If messages are no longer being received from a remote device; a timeout mechanism is used. Streams are removed if they are no longer receiving packets after a default value of 30 seconds.

To support a 1-Gigabit Ethernet connection to a reference clock, you can use a special interface that is labeled PTP on the faceplate of the QFX10002 switch. This interface is named ptp0 in the Junos OS CLI. This interface only supports encapsulated PTP, ARP, and PING packets to support the reference clock connection. Non-PTP traffic is not supported. You can configure this interface as a client clock interface to connect to a reference but not as a tagged interface. You can, however, configure 10-, 40-, and 100-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces as primary clock, client clock, and in tagged and untagged configurations.

With the enterprise profile enabled, there are restrictions on which parameters you can configure or cannot configure.

With the enterprise profile enabled, you can configure the following parameters:

  • Priority1

    The range is from 0 to 255, and the default value is 128.

  • Priority2

    The range is from 0 to 255, and the default value is 128.

  • Domain number

    The range is from 0 to 127, and the default value is 0.

  • Clock mode

    Clock mode can be ordinary or boundary.

  • Delay request

    The Range -7 to +7 seconds, and the default value is 0 (1pps).

  • Sync interval

    The range is -7 to +4 seconds, and the default value is 0 (1pps).

With the enterprise profile enabled, you cannot configure the following parameters:

  • Announce interval

    Default value is 0 (1pps).

  • Announce timeout

    The announce receipt timeout interval is set for three announce intervals for preferred primary clocks, and four announce intervals for all other primary clocks. All primary clocks will be treated as preferred primary clocks, so the announce receipt timeout interval is set to three announce intervals.

  • Unicast negotiation

Configure PTP Enterprise Profile

Note:

When you enable the enterprise profile, you cannot enable any other profile. Also, unicast negotiation is disabled when you enable the enterprise profile.

Configure PTP and its Options

This topic includes the following tasks:

Configure PTP Options

To configure PTP options:

  1. In configuration mode, go to the [edit protocols ptp] hierarchy level:
  2. Configure the clock mode as either boundary or ordinary. This attribute is mandatory and has no default value.

    The boundary option signifies that the clock can be both a primary clock and a client clock. The ordinary option signifies that the clock is either a primary clock or a client clock.

  3. Configure the profile type as enterprise. This attribute is mandatory.
  4. (Optional) Configure the PTP domain option with values from 0 through 127. The default value is 0.
  5. (Optional) Configure the priority1 option with values from 0 through 255. The default value is 128.

    The priority1 value determines the best primary clock. The priority1-value is also advertised in the primary clock’s announce message to other slaves.

  6. (Optional) Configure the priority2 option with values from 0 through 255. The default value is 128.

    The priority2 value differentiates and prioritizes the primary clock to avoid confusion when priority1-value is the same for different primary clocks in a network.

Configure Member Clock Options

Configure the following options after the aforementioned PTP options have been set.

  1. Configure the client clock.
  2. (Optional) Configure the delay-request option in the client node with values from –7 through 7. The default value is 0.

    The delay request value is the logarithmic mean interval in seconds between the delay request messages sent by the client to the primary.

  3. Configure the interface for the client.
  4. Configure the multicast-mode option for the client. You can set this option when PTP multicast mode of messaging is needed.
  5. Configure the transport option in multicast mode as IPv4.

    The encapsulation type for PTP packet transport is IPv4.

  6. Configure the IP address of the local logical interface.

Configure Primary Clock Options

Configure the following options after the aforementioned PTP options and client clock options have been set.

  1. Configure the primary clock.
  2. (Optional) Configure the delay-req-timeout option for the primary.

    The maximum timeout for delay request messages is between 30 and 300 seconds. We recommend 30 seconds.

  3. Configure the interface for the primary.
  4. Configure the multicast-mode option for the primary. You can set this option when PTP multicast mode of messaging is needed.
  5. Configure the transport option in multicast mode as IPv4.

    The encapsulation type for PTP packet transport is IPv4.

  6. Configure the IP address of the interface acting as the local PTP primary port.

    If the primary clock connection is through a 1-Gigabit Ethernet interface, configure the interface named ptp0 interface.

    This interface is named ptp0 by default.

PTP over IRB for Broadcast Profiles

The IEEE 1588 PTP boundary clock (BC) applications for broadcast media often requires many PTP streams to use a common local IP address. These packets are forwarded through L2 switching. In these use cases, there are no physical interface IFLs created for each PTP physical interface, as would be usually expected for PTP configurations on physical interfaces. Configuration over integrated routing and bridging (IRB) interfaces allows you to meet this requirement. Currently, there is an existing feature that supports multicast-mode with physical interfaces. PTP over IRB for broadcast profiles will extend this support for physical interfaces on IRB interfaces. PTP BC over IRB for broadcast profiles will support SMPTE/AES67/AES67-SMPTE profiles (multicast PTP over IP). This new interface type is added to the multicast profiles. The PTP multicast-mode supports IRB interfaces using the IPv4 transport type that is used with physical interfaces.

Note:

PTP BC features developed for QFX5110 and QFX5200 are still available. Support is extended to IRB interfaces for PTP BC over multicast for broadcast profiles.

CLI Configuration

A new CLI configuration is added to this feature for multicast mode to identify the L2 interface that needs to be transported. This new interface type is supported in the example configuration statements below.

IPv4 Configuration Example

Multiple IRB IPv4 Configuration Example

CLI Commands

There are no new operational commands being added. Areas in the display output that show an interface name will show the appropriate name for the IRB interface and will be expanded to include the L2 IFL name for IRB interfaces.

Note:

Available vty commands that are used to help diagnose the operation of the clksyncd and PTP protocol stack will not change, but will support the new interface types and information.

show ptp lock-status detail

show ptp primary detail

show ptp slave detail

show ptp statistics

show ptp statistics detail

PTP Media Profile

The PTP media profiles comprise three profiles: SMPTE ST-2059-2, AES67, and AES67+SMPTE ST-2059-2. These profiles support video and audio applications for capture (for example, cameras) to be used in professional broadcast environments. These profiles supports PTP over IPv4 multicast and ordinary and boundary clocks.

Benefits of the PTP Media Profiles

  • The PTP media profiles enable multiple video and audio sources to stay in synchronization across multiple devices.

Functionality Common to the SMPTE ST-2059-2, AES67, and the AES67+SMPTE ST-2059-2 Profiles

These profiles include the following functionality:

Note:

These profiles do not use an alternate primary clock, path trace, unicast message negotiation, alternate time scales, or acceptable primary table.

  • Support for both ordinary clocks and boundary clocks as part of the IEEE 1588 PTP specification.

  • Support for encapsulating PTP over IPv4/UDP.

    Multicast is required for both PTP over IPv4 and PTP over UDP.

  • Support for IEEE 1588 delay request and response method for the path delay measurement.

  • Support for the default IEEE 1588 BMCA algorithm.

  • Support for standard management packets.

  • Support for IGMPv2.

    IGMPv3 is optional.

SMPTE Profile

The SMPTE profile is based on the SMPTE ST-2059-2 standard and was created specifically to synchronize video equipment in a professional broadcast environment. The standard allows multiple video sources to stay in synchronization across various equipment by providing time and frequency synchronization to all devices. This standard is used with other SMPTE standards such as SMPTE ST 2059-1, which defines a point in time (the SMPTE Epoch) used for aligning real-time signals, and formula for ongoing signal alignment. Alignment is considered met when two clocks are within 1 microsecond of each other. This implies that each client should be accurate with +/- .5 microseconds of the central clock.

AES67 Profile

The AES67 profile is based on the AES67 standard and supports professional quality audio applications for high performance streaming over IPv4 multicast transport in media networks with low latencies. This profile enables audio streams to be combined at a receiver and maintain stream synchronization. The standard uses IPv4 multicast and IGMP, plus the DiffServ and DSCP fields, to select packet quality of service. Audio devices transmit their content using RTP (Real Time Protocol).

AES67+SMPTE ST-2059-2 Profile

The AES67+SMPTE ST-2059-2 profile is based on both the AES67 and SMPTE ST-2059-2 standards and is used in professional audio and video media applications. This profile enables the two standards to operate together over the same network.

Configure PTP Media Profiles

Note:

When you enable any of the PTP media profiles (AES67, AES67+SMPTE, or SMPTE), you cannot enable any other profile.

Configure AES67, SMPTE, and AES67+SMPTE Profiles

This topic provides the configuration necessary to enable any of the three media profiles (AES67, SMPTE, and AES67+SMPTE), and includes the following sections.

Optional and Required Parameters for SMPTE ST-2059-2, AES67, and AES67+SMPTE ST-2059-2 Profiles

Table 1 and Table 2 provide default values and ranges for optional and required PTP parameters:

Table 2: Defaults and Ranges for PTP Parameters

Profile

SM (Synchronization Metadata) TLV

Domain

Priority1

Priority2

SMPTE

Yes

  • Default: 127

  • Range: 0 through 127

  • Default: 128

  • Range: 0 through 255

  • Default: 128

  • Range: 0 through 255

AES67

No

  • Default: 0

  • Range: 0 through 127

  • Default: 128

  • Range: 0 through 255

  • Default: 128

  • Range: 0 through 255

AES67+SMPTE

Yes

  • Default: 0

  • Range: 0 through 127

  • Default: 128

  • Range: 0 through 255

  • Default: 128

  • Range: 0 through 255

Table 3: Defaults and Ranges for PTP Parameters

Profile

Announce

Announce Timeout

Sync

Delay-Req

SMPTE

  • Default: -2

  • Range: -3 through 1

  • Default: 3

  • Range: 2 through 10

  • Default: -3

  • Range: -7 through -1

  • Default: -3

  • Range: -7 through -3

AES67

  • Default: 1

  • Range: 0 through 4

  • Default: 3

  • Range: 2 through 10

  • Default: -3

  • Range: -4 through 1

  • Default: -3

  • Range: -7 through -3

AES67+SMPTE

  • Default: 0

  • Range: 0 through 1

  • Default: 3

  • Range: 2 through 10

  • Default: -3

  • Range: -4 through -1

  • Default: -3

  • Range: -7 through -3

Configure PTP Media Profile

To configure the any of the media profiles:

Note:

On the QFX Series, when you configure either a primary or client port, it must be on the same subnet as the remote device to which it is connected.

Note:

When either the enterprise or any of the media profiles are enabled, the primary and client ports must be configured in multicast-mode. The primary sends the announce and sync packets as multicast IP packets, but the QFX Series client will send the delay-req packets as unicast IP packets.

  1. In configuration mode, go to the [edit protocols ptp] hierarchy level:
  2. Configure the clock mode as either boundary or ordinary. This attribute is mandatory and has no default value.

    The boundary option signifies that both primary and client must be configured. The ordinary option signifies that only the primary, or only the client, must be configured.

    For example:

  3. Configure the profile type.

    Configuring the profile type is mandatory.

  4. Configure the clock mode.
  5. Configure the interface for the client.
  6. Configure the multicast-mode option for the client.
  7. Configure the transport option in multicast-mode as IPv4.
  8. Configure the IP address of the interface acting as the local PTP client port.
    Note:

    You must also configure this IP address at the [edit interfaces interface-name] hierarchy level.

  9. Configure the interface for the primary.
  10. Configure the multicast-mode option for the primary.
  11. Configure the transport option in multicast-mode as IPv4.
  12. Configure the local IP address for the primary.
    Note:

    You must also configure this IP address at the [edit interfaces interface-name] hierarchy level.

  13. (Optional) Configure the PTP domain option.
  14. (Optional) Configure the priority1 option.

    The priority1 value determines the best primary clock. The priority1-value is also advertised in the primary clock’s announce message to other slaves.

  15. (Optional) Configure the priority2 option.

    The priority2 value differentiates and prioritizes the primary clock to avoid confusion when priority1-value is the same for different primary clocks in a network.

  16. (Optional) Configure the announce-timeout option in the client node.

    The announce timeout value signifies the number of times an announce interval message has to pass through the client without receiving the announce message—that is, the timeout period for announce messages.

  17. (Optional) Specify the log mean interval between announce messages.

    The primary boundary clock sends announce messages to manual clock clients as specified in the announce-interval value.

  18. (Optional) Configure the sync interval option for the primary clock.

    The sync interval is the logarithmic mean interval between synchronous messages that is sent by the primary.

  19. (Optional) Configure the delay-request option in the client node.

    The delay request value is the logarithmic mean interval in seconds between the delay request messages sent by the client to the primary.

  20. Verify the lock status of the client.
    Note:

    On the QFX Series, the client will not lock to the primary unless at least eight sync packets per second are received from the primary.

    For example:

    The output shows that the lock state is aligned.

  21. Verify the status of the primary.

    For example:

    The output shows that the primary is active.