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PTP over Ethernet

SUMMARY PTP over Ethernet provides effective implementation of packet-based technology that enables the operator to deliver synchronization services on packet- based mobile backhaul networks that are configured in Ethernet rings.

PTP over Ethernet Overview

Precision Time Protocol (PTP) is supported over IEEE 802.3 or Ethernet links on ACX Series routers. This functionality is supported in compliance with the IEEE 1588-2008 specification. Deployment of PTP at every hop in an Ethernet ring by using the Ethernet encapsulation method enables robust, redundant, and high-performance topologies to be created that enables a highly precise time and phase synchronization to be obtained.

The ACX Series routers can be directly connected to different types of base stations (for example, base transceiver station (BTS) in 2G, NodeB in 3G, and eNodeB in 4G networks) and different types of routers that hand off time- division multiplexing (TDM), ATM, and Ethernet traffic to the base station controller. ACX Series routers must extract the network clock from these sources and pass on synchronization information to the base stations to help the routers synchronize with the base station controller.

Most of the network deployments that use Ethernet contain a minimum of two Ethernet rings, while some of the network topologies might also contain up to three Ethernet rings. Consider a scenario in which the first ring contains aggregation routers (MX Series routers) and the second ring contains access routers (ACX Series routers). In such a network, about 10 or 12 nodes of MX Series routers and ACX Series routers are present in the aggregation and access Ethernet rings.

Some of the 4G base stations that are connected to ACX Series routers need to receive the timing and synchronization information in a packet-based form. Such base station vendors support only packet interfaces that use Ethernet encapsulation for PTP packets for time and phase synchronization. Therefore, any node (an ACX Series router) that is directly connected to a 4G base station must be able to use the Ethernet encapsulation method for PTP on a primary port to support a packet-based timing capability.

PTP over Ethernet encapsulation also facilitates an easier, optimal network deployment model than PTP over IPv4. Using IPv4, the nodes (primary and client devices) participate in unicast negotiation in which the client node is provisioned with the IP address of the primary node and requests unicast messages to be sent to it from the primary node. A primary node is the router that functions as the PTP server where the primary clock is located and a client node is the router that functions as the PTP client where the client clock is located. Because PTP over Ethernet uses multicast addresses, the client node automatically learns about the primary nodes in the network. Also, the client node is able to immediately receive the multicast messages from the primary node and can begin sending messages to the primary node without the need for any provisioning configuration.

An interface on which the primary clock is configured is called a primary interface and an interface on which the client clock is configured is called a client interface. A primary interface functions as the primary port and a client interface functions as the client port. For PTP over Ethernet, apart from configuring a port or a logical interface to operate as a primary clock or a client clock, you can also configure a port or a logical interface to function as both a primary clock and a client clock. This type of port is called a dynamic port, stateful port, or a bidirectional port. Such a stateful port enables the network to more efficiently adapt to the introduction and failure of timing sources by forming the shortest synchronization trees from a particular source. This behavior is implemented as defined by the best primary clock algorithm (BMCA) in the ITU-T G.8265.1 Precision time protocol telecom profile for frequency synchronization specification.

On both MX Series and ACX Series routers, you can achieve the highest quality performance if you configure every node in a synchronization chain as a PTP boundary clock. In Ethernet ring-based topologies, you can configure a port or a logical interface to function either as a primary port or as a client port to enable redundancy when a node or link failure occurs. This dynamic port or dual-port functionality is in accordance with the IEEE 1588-2008 standard and enables the implementation of PTP in data center or financial applications.

Apart from enabling every node to be available for configuration as a PTP boundary clock, it is also necessary to enable a logical interface to be configured either as a primary port or a client port. When you configure a logical interface or even a shared IP address to be a primary port or a client port, a PTP protocol stack can represent dynamic ports and the PTP application selects the correct state (primary or client) for any specific port in the system based on the output of the default PTP BMCA and the states of other ports in the system.

While an ACX Series router supports the PTP over Ethernet functionality, a Brilliant Grand Primary such as an MX Series router or a TCA Series Timing Client does not support PTP over Ethernet. In such a scenario, the ACX Series router functions as a boundary clock with a PTP client port using IPv4 as the encapsulation mode and primary ports using Ethernet as the encapsulation mode for PTP traffic. For example, consider an ACX Series router named ACX1 to have two potential client interfaces, one that is fixed as a client-only port using IPv4 on the link toward an MX Series router named MX1, and a dynamic port that functions as a client port using PTP over Ethernet on the link toward another ACX Series router named ACX2. In addition, ACX1 also contains a port that is a primary-only port using PTP over Ethernet and connects to the base station.

Because PTP over Ethernet uses multicast addresses, a client port can automatically start receiving the multicast announce messages transmitted by the primary ports on a network and can also start communication with the primary node with minimal or no configuration. Unlike PTP over IPv4 where IP addresses are used to identify the primary and client ports, with PTP over Ethernet, multicast MAC addresses are used in the forwarding of PTP traffic. The IEEE 1588 standard defines two types of multicast MAC addresses 01-80-C2-00-00-0E (link local multicast) and 01-1B-19-00-00-00 (standard Ethernet multicast) for PTP over Ethernet operations.

Guidelines to Configure PTP over Ethernet

Keep the following points in mind when you configure PTP over Ethernet for multicast mode of transmission of PTP traffic:

  • You can configure a port or a logical interface to be a primary clock for PTP over Ethernet to provide packet-based synchronization to base stations that support time and phase alignment; this configuration is compliant with Annexure F of the IEEE 1588-2008 specification.

  • Two multicast MAC addresses are used for PTP over Ethernet: 01-1B-19-00-00-00 and 01-80-C2-00-00-0E. The first address is a more standard Ethernet MAC address that is expected to be flooded by all types of Ethernet bridges and switches and also by a large number of base station vendors. A node with this MAC address can be a node that does not process PTP packets. The second address is a reserved address in the IEEE 802.1Q standard for Ethernet encapsulation that is required to be filtered and not forwarded. This MAC address is used to ensure complete end-to-end support of PTP, instead of transmission of packets through any network element that does not support PTP. This address is the default address for G.8275.1 (PTP Profile for time or phase distribution) and a node with this MAC address is a node that supports processing of PTP packets.

  • Both of the MAC addresses, 01-1B-19-00-00-00 and 01-80-C2-00-00-0E, are supported on multiple ports simultaneously to enable maximum flexibility and extension of existing networks for future deployments. A single PTP port is configured for one of the MAC addresses at a time.

  • PTP packets are sent with the unique MAC address assigned to each port as the MAC source address. In the PTP packet, the Ethernet frame portion of the packet contains the Destination MAC field. This field contains either of the two MAC addresses, 01-1B-19-00-00-00 or 01-80-C2-00-00-0E. Also, the Ethernet frame portion contains the Source MAC field that contains the MAC address of the source port and the Ethertype field that contains the PTP Ethertype value of 0x88F7. Apart from the Ethernet frame, the PTP packet contains the PTP payload.

  • When you configure a port for PTP over Ethernet to be a client port, a primary port, or both by having a dynamic port that can be either a primary port or a client port depending on the states of the other ports in the PTP application, it is possible to build an easily provisioned, redundant PTP service in an Ethernet ring where every node is configured as a boundary clock.

  • A boundary clock can function as a client clock to a device using IP (such as a TCA Series Timing Client or an MX Series router) on one port and can also function as a client clock, a primary clock, or both on other ports using Ethernet as the encapsulation method. This behavior occurs within a single PTP domain number.

  • Best Master Clock Algorithm (BMCA) and the port state machine are supported to determine the states of all the ports in a system and the correct state (primary or client) for a certain port to process PTP packets.

  • PTP over Ethernet supports fully redundant and resilient ring-based configurations of up to 10 nodes for a form of fourth-generation (4G) evolution known as Long-Term Evolution-Time Division Duplex (LTE-TDD). ACX Series routers support a single node or link failure and all nodes maintain a phase accuracy of plus or minus 1.5 microseconds matching a common source.

  • You can configure the asymmetry value between the primary port and the client port, which indicates a value to be added to the path delay value to make the delay symmetric and equal to the path from the primary port to the client port, on either a dynamic-state port or a client-only port.

  • You cannot enable PTP over Ethernet on Ethernet interfaces that are configured with 802.1Q VLAN tags or contain a user-configured MAC address.

  • While you can configure unique PTP client interfaces or client ports with different encapsulation mechanisms (such as IPv4 and Ethernet), the boundary clock can use only a single encapsulation method for all of the primary ports. Therefore, you must define either IPv4 or Ethernet encapsulation for all the ports or logical interfaces that can possibly function as boundary clock primaries. Primary ports select the link-local flag based on each port.

  • The following limitations apply to the maximum number of ports that you can configure when you use PTP over Ethernet:

    • You can configure a maximum of four client ports on a router. A client port or logical interface is defined as any client-only port configured for IPv4 or Ethernet, or any dynamic port configured for Ethernet.

    • You can configure up to 29 primary ports on a router. A primary port or logical interface is defined as any primary-only port configured for IPv4 or Ethernet, or any dynamic port configured for Ethernet.

    • Any logical interface that you configure as a dynamic port is considered to be both a client port and a primary port, even if it functions only as a client port or a primary port in a network, when the total number of client ports and primary ports on a router is computed.

  • In PTP over IPv4 deployment, it is necessary to configure certain basic settings on a PTP primary port before the PTP client ports to connect to the primary port. PTP over Ethernet offers a plug-and-play service because any PTP client starts receiving packets and can request delay-response packets from the primary port after you configure an interface to be a primary.

  • PTP over Ethernet is compatible with Junos OS releases earlier than Release 12.3X51. When you perform an upgrade to Release 12.3X51 and later from a previous release on an ACX Series router, you can modify the client and primary ports previously configured for IPv4 to enable PTP over Ethernet based on your network needs.

  • You cannot configure a fully redundant PTP ring using IP. A fully redundant PTP ring is supported only when Ethernet encapsulation is used.

  • Configuration of dynamic ports in conjunction with Synchronous Ethernet to enable hybrid mode is not supported.

  • Multiple PTP timing domains are not supported for PTP over Ethernet, similar to PTP over IPv4. Although a single node can contain interfaces configured for PTP over IPv4 and PTP over Ethernet, both of these interfaces must be part of the same PTP domain.

  • SONET/SDH networks define the ability to configure a local priority to a synchronization source in the ITU G.781 standard. Addition of such locally configured priorities to PTP sources to influence BMCA to determine a particular path for PTP packets is not supported.

  • Although you can configure a client port to use either IP or Ethernet simultaneously, a single client port is selected based on the announce messages it receives from the primary port and the PTP event packets are exchanged only with a single primary port.

  • The IPv4 unicast implementation of PTP enables you to limit the number of client ports that can be supported simultaneously in the system. With multicast Ethernet-based implementation, in which the primary port is not provisioned with the client port information, the primary port cannot limit the number of client ports that it services. This control must be exercised with proper networking planning and design.

Configure PTP Dynamic Ports for Ethernet Encapsulation

For PTP over Ethernet, you can also configure a port to function as both a client port and a primary port. This type of port is called a dynamic port, a stateful port, or a bidirectional port. Such a dynamic port enables the transfer of frequency for synchronization services, in addition to time and phase alignment, when PTP functionality is not hop-by-hop and you have provisioned primary and client roles or interfaces.

To configure PTP over Ethernet with dynamic or bidirectional ports for multicast mode of transmission, you must include the multicast-mode statement at the [edit protocols ptp stateful interface interface-name] hierarchy level.

To enable a node to function as both a primary and a client port in PTP over Ethernet networks:

  1. Configure the interface on which to respond to downstream PTP client ports or clients.
    Note:

    For the configuration to work, the interface you specify must be configured at the [edit interfaces interface-name] hierarchy level.

  2. Configure the upstream multicast PTP dynamic clock source parameters.
  3. Specify the encapsulation type for PTP packet transport as Ethernet or IEEE 802.3. This statement is mandatory.

    Alternatively, specify the encapsulation type as Ethernet with the link-local multicast address to be used in the sending of PTP messages. If you specify the link-local attribute, the primary clock chooses either of the two MAC addresses defined in the IEEE 1588-2008 standard. When you configure this option, the system attempts to use the 01 -80-C2-00-00-0E MAC address (link-local multicast MAC address) for multicast transmission. If this MAC address is not available, the 01-1B-19-00-00-00 address (standard Ethernet multicast address) is used as the second priority. The standard Ethernet multicast address is used by default. You need to explicitly configure the link-local multicast address.

After you have configured the PTP over Ethernet client clock interface, enter the commit command from configuration mode.

Configure PTP Multicast Primary and Member Ports for Ethernet Encapsulation

On an ACX Series router, you can configure a Precision Time Protocol (PTP) primary boundary clock with IEEE 802.3 or Ethernet encapsulation of PTP messages to the clients (ordinary and boundary) so that they can establish their relative time offset from this primary's clock or clock reference. PTP over Ethernet uses multicast addresses for communication of PTP messages between the client clock and the primary clock. The client clock automatically learns of primary clocks in the network, is immediately able to receive the multicast messages from the primary clock, and can begin sending messages to the primary clock without any pre-provisioning. The primary boundary clock synchronizes time through a client boundary port.

To configure PTP over Ethernet with multicast primary and client ports, you must include the multicast-mode transport ieee-802.3 statement at the [edit protocols ptp master interface interface-name] and [edit protocols ptp slave interface interface-name] hierarchy levels, respectively.

To configure a PTP over Ethernet primary boundary clock and client boundary clock for multicast transmission, complete the following tasks:

Configure the PTP over Ethernet Primary Boundary Clock Parameters

To configure the parameters of a PTP over Ethernet primary boundary clock:

  1. Configure the clock mode.
  2. Configure the primary clock.
  3. (Optional) Specify the log mean interval between announce messages—from 0 through 4. By default, one announce message is sent every two seconds. This configuration is used for manual clock clients. The primary boundary clock sends announce messages to manual clock clients as specified in the announce-interval value.
  4. Configure the interface on which to respond to downstream PTP clients or client ports.

    For details about configuring the parameters for the primary boundary clock interface, see Configure PTP over Ethernet Primary Boundary Clock Interface

  5. (Optional) Specify the maximum log mean interval between announce messages—from 0 through 4. The default value is 4.
  6. (Optional) Specify the maximum log mean interval between delay-response messages—from –7 through 4. The default value is 4.
  7. (Optional) Specify the maximum log mean interval between synchronization messages—from –7 through 4. The default value is 4.
  8. (Optional) Specify the minimum log mean interval between announce messages—from 0 through 4. The default value is 0.
  9. (Optional) Specify the minimum log mean interval between delay-response messages—from –7 through 4. The default value is –7.
  10. (Optional) Specify the minimum log mean interval between synchronization messages—from –7 through 4. The default value is –7.
  11. (Optional) Specify the log mean interval between synchronization messages—from –7 through 4. The default value is –6. This configuration is used for manual clock clients. The primary boundary clock sends synchronization messages to manual clock clients as specified in the syn-interval-value statement.

After you have configured the PTP primary boundary clock parameters, enter the commit command from configuration mode. To complete the configuration of the primary boundary clock, complete Configure PTP over Ethernet Primary Boundary Clock Interface.

Configure the PTP over Ethernet Primary Boundary Clock Interface

After you configured the primary boundary clock parameters for PTP over Ethernet with multicast transmission of PTP traffic, complete the configuration of the primary boundary clock by configuring an interface to act in the role of the primary clock.

To configure a PTP over Ethernet primary boundary clock interface:

  1. Configure the interface on which to respond to downstream PTP client ports or clients.
    Note:

    For the configuration to work, the interface you specify must be configured at the [edit interfaces interface-name] hierarchy level.

  2. On this interface, configure multicast as the transmission mode of traffic for PTP clients.
  3. Specify the encapsulation type for PTP packet transport as Ethernet or IEEE 802.3. This statement is mandatory.

    Alternatively, specify the encapsulation type as Ethernet with the link-local multicast address to be used in the sending of PTP messages. If you specify the link-local attribute, the primary clock chooses either of the two MAC addresses defined in the IEEE 1588-2008 standard. When you configure this option, the system attempts to use the 01 -80-C2-00-00-0E MAC address (link-local multicast MAC address) for multicast transmission. If this MAC address is not available, the 01-1B-19-00-00-00 address (standard Ethernet multicast address) is used as the second priority. The standard Ethernet multicast address is used by default. You need to explicitly configure the link-local multicast address.

After you have configured the PTP over Ethernet primary clock interface, enter the commit command from configuration mode.

Configure the PTP over Ethernet Member Clock Parameters

An interface on which the primary clock is configured is called a primary interface and an interface on which the client clock is configured is called a client interface. A primary interface functions as the primary port and a client interface functions as the client port. Because PTP over Ethernet uses multicast addresses, a client port can automatically start receiving the multicast announce messages transmitted by the primary ports on a network and can also start communication with the primary port with minimal or no configuration. You can optionally configure these settings for a client port that communicates with the primary ports using PTP over Ethernet.

To configure a PTP over Ethernet client clock.

  1. Configure the clock mode:
  2. Configure the client clock.
  3. (Optional) Specify the number of announce messages that a client clock or port—configured on an ACX Series router—must miss before an announce timeout is declared—from 2 through 10. The default value is 3.
  4. (Optional) Specify the logarithmic mean interval in seconds between the delay request messages sent by the client port to the primary port—from –6 through 3. The default value is 0.
  5. Configure the interface for the client clock.
  6. (Optional) Configure the log mean interval between synchronization messages—from –6 through -3. The default value is –6, which means by default, 64 synchronous interval messages sent per second.

After you have configured the PTP client clock parameters, enter the commit command in configuration mode. To complete the configuration of the client clock, complete Configure PTP over Ethernet Member Clock Interface

Configure the PTP over Ethernet Member Clock Interface

The client clock interface responds to the upstream PTP primary clock.

To configure the PTP client clock interface:

  1. Configure the interface for the client clock.
  2. Configure the upstream multicast PTP primary clock source parameters.
  3. Specify the encapsulation type for PTP packet transport as Ethernet or IEEE 802.3. This statement is mandatory.

    Alternatively, specify the encapsulation type as Ethernet with the link-local multicast address to be used in the sending of PTP messages. If you specify the link-local attribute, the primary clock chooses either of the two MAC addresses defined in the IEEE 1588-2008 standard. When you configure this option, the system attempts to use the 01 -80-C2-00-00-0E MAC address (link-local multicast MAC address) for multicast transmission. If this MAC address is not available, the 01-1B-19-00-00-00 address (standard Ethernet multicast address) is used as the second priority. The standard Ethernet multicast address is used by default. You need to explicitly configure the link-local multicast address.

After you have configured the PTP over Ethernet client clock interface, enter the commit command in configuration mode.

Example: Configure PTP over Ethernet for Multicast Primary, Member, and Dynamic Ports

In PTP over Ethernet networks, the primary sends the announce, synchronization, and delay-response packets using the multicast method. If any unicast delay-request message is received, the primary disregards the message and does not send delay-response messages to the client. A PTP client receives the multicast announce packets from the primary or multiple primaries and determines the best primary using Best Master Clock Algorithm (BMCA). A client receives and processes the synchronization from the selected primary clock. The client sends delay-request messages to this primary using the multicast method and processes the delay-response messages from the primary to establish synchronization.

Both the link-local MAC address and the standard 802.3 multicast MAC address can be present in a system. However, a PTP interface supports only one of the following at a point in time:

  • Layer 2 multicast with link-local MAC address

  • Layer 2 multicast with standard multicast MAC address

  • PTP over IPv4

When you configure both IPv4 and Ethernet encapsulation, the unicast-negotiation configuration applies only to IPv4 encapsulation. It is not effective for PTP over Ethernet operation.

When you configure a logical interface by using the stateful statement at the [edit protocols ptp] hierarchy level, each interface that you configure as a stateful or dynamic port is considered to be both a master and a client port. Although an ACX Series router supports up to 32 master ports and 4 client ports, you can configure only 4 unique logical interfaces as potential PTP masters by using the stateful statement because the interface is treated as both a client and a master interface. You cannot configure the interface that you specify to be a stateful or dynamic port with the master or slave statements.

This example shows how to configure a master port, client port, and a dynamic port for PTP over Ethernet and PTP over IPv4 encapsulation, and how to configure unicast and multicast mode of transmission of PTP traffic among the master and client nodes.

Requirements

This example uses the following hardware and software components:

  • An ACX Series router

  • Junos OS Release 12.3X51 or later

Overview

While an ACX Series router supports the PTP over Ethernet functionality, a Brilliant Reference Clock such as an MX Series router or a TCA Series Timing Client does not support PTP over Ethernet. Consider a sample deployment in which an ACX Series router named ACX1 functions as a boundary clock with a PTP client port using IPv4 as the encapsulation mode and master ports using Ethernet as the encapsulation mode for PTP traffic. ACX1 contains two potential client interfaces, one that is fixed as a client-only port using IPv4 on the link toward an MX Series router named MX2, and a dynamic port that functions as a client using PTP over Ethernet on the link toward another ACX Series router named ACX2. In addition, ACX1 also contains a port that is a master-only port using PTP over Ethernet and connects to the base station.

In this example, the router uses either interface ge-0/2/0.0 or ge-0/2/1.0 as the selected client interface based on the announce messages received from the master and the port that was selected using the Best Master Clock Algorithm (BMCA). The interface ge-0/1/4.0 is always in the master state. According to the IEEE 1588 specification, if port ge-0/2/0.0 is selected as the client interface, interface ge-0/2/1.0 transitions to the master state. If interface ge-0/2/1.0is selected as the client port, interface ge-0/2/0.0 transitions to the listening state. You can also configure the interface ge-0/1/4.0 as a client only interface for PTP over Ethernet, if necessary, for completeness of the configuration.

Configuration

In this example, you configure a master port, a client port, and a dynamic port for PTP over Ethernet and PTP over IPv4 encapsulation. You can also configure unicast and multicast modes of transmission of PTP traffic among the master and client nodes.

CLI Quick Configuration

To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them in a text file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network configuration, and then copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level:

Configure PTP over Ethernet for Multicast Master, Slave, and Dynamic Ports

Step-by-Step Procedure

The following example requires you to navigate various levels in the configuration hierarchy.

To configure the master, client, and dynamic interfaces, and a boundary clock with unicast and multicast mode of transmission of PTP packets in PTP over IPv4 and PTP over Ethernet topologies:

  1. Configure the master interface, and enter edit mode for the interface.

  2. Configure a description for the interface.

  3. Configure a logical unit and specify the protocol family.

  4. Specify the address for the logical interface

  5. Configure the client interface, and enter edit mode for the interface.

  6. Configure a description for the interface.

  7. Configure a logical unit and specify the protocol family.

  8. Specify the address for the logical interface

  9. Configure the stateful interface, and enter edit mode for the interface.

  10. Configure a description for the interface.

  11. Configure a logical unit and specify the protocol family.

  12. Specify the address for the logical interface

  13. Configure the clock mode as boundary clock.

  14. Specify the PTP domain value.

  15. Configure the local client interface from which the boundary master receives time and passes it on to the configured clock clients.

  16. Configure the upstream unicast PTP master clock source parameters.

  17. Configure the encapsulation type for PTP packet transport.

  18. Configure the PTP master parameters by specifying the IP address of the PTP master clock and the IP address of the local interface.

  19. Configure the master interface in this example.

  20. On the master interface, configure multicast transmission for downstream PTP clock clients.

  21. On the master interface, configure the encapsulation type as Ethernet for PTP packet transport.

  22. Configure the dynamic or stateful interface in this example.

  23. On the dynamic interface, configure multicast transmission for downstream PTP clock clients.

  24. On the dynamic interface, configure the encapsulation type as Ethernet for PTP packet transport and the link-local multicast address to be used.

Results

In configuration mode, confirm your configuration by entering the show command. If the output does not display the intended configuration, repeat the configuration instructions in this example to correct it.

After you have configured the device, enter the commit command in configuration mode.

Verify PTP over Ethernet Multicast Dynamic, Master, and Slave Settings

Confirm that the configuration is working properly.

Verifying the PTP Clock Details
Purpose

Verify that the PTP clock is working as expected.

Action

In operational mode, enter the run show ptp clock command to display comprehensive, globally configured clock details.

Meaning

The output displays the clock details, such as the encapsulation method used for transmission of PTP traffic and the number of configured stateful or dynamic ports. Although a dynamic port functions as either a client or a master port, the value displayed in the Stateful Ports field denotes the dynamic ports that you explicitly configured. The number of dynamic ports is not computed and displayed in the fields that display the explicitly configured master and client ports. For more information about the run show ptp clock, see show ptp clock in the CLI explorer.

Verify the Lock Status of the Slave
Purpose

Verify that the client clock is aligned to the master clock by checking the lock status of the client.

Action

In operational mode, enter the run show ptp lock-status command to display the lock status of the client.

Meaning

The output displays information about the lock status of the client. The output shows whether the client is aligned to the master clock or not, and the interface name configured for PTP on the client. The Master Source Port field displays the address of the master clock when PTP over IPv4 is configured and the multicast MAC address of the source when PTP over Ethernet is configured. For more information about the run show ptp lock-status operational command, see in the show ptp lock status.

Verify the PTP Options on the Slave
Purpose

Verify the PTP options that are set on the client and the current status of the master.

Action

In operational mode, enter the run show ptp slave command to display the configured client.

Meaning

The output displays information about the configured client and the status of the client. For more information about the show ptp slave operational command, see in the show ptp slave.

Verify the PTP Options and the Current Status of the Master
Purpose

Verify the PTP options that are set for the master and its current status.

Action

In operational mode, enter the run show ptp master command to display the configured options for the master.

Meaning

The output displays information about the configured master and the current status of the master. For more information about the run show ptp master operational command, see in the show ptp master.

Verify the Number and Status of the PTP Ports
Purpose

Verify the number of PTP ports and their current status.

Action

In operational mode, enter the run show ptp port command to display the configured ports.

Meaning

The output displays information about the number of ports created according to the configuration and their current status. The name of the interface configured for PTP and the number of times a stateful port transitioned from the client to the master state and vice versa is displayed. For more information about the run show ptp port operational command, see in the show ptp port.

Verify PTP Statistics
Purpose

Verify the statistical details of the PTP configuration.

Action

In operational mode, enter the run show ptp statistics command to display the statistical information regarding the configured PTP clocks.

Meaning

The output displays brief or detailed information about the operation of configured PTP clocks. Statistical parameters include information such as the total number of PTP packets transmitted or received by a master or client interface and the number of various messages (such as announce and synchronization messages) that are sent between a master and a client. For more information about the show ptp statistics operational command, see show ptp statistics .