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show route forwarding-table

Syntax

Description

Display the Routing Engine's forwarding table, including the network-layer prefixes and their next hops. This command is used to help verify that the routing protocol process has relayed the correction information to the forwarding table. The Routing Engine constructs and maintains one or more routing tables. From the routing tables, the Routing Engine derives a table of active routes, called the forwarding table.

Options

none

Display the routes in the forwarding table.

detail | extensive | summary

(Optional) Display the specified level of output.

ccc

(Optional) Display the specified circuit cross-connect interface name for entries to match.

destination

(Optional) Display the destination prefix.

family family-name

(Optional) Display routing table entries for the specified family: ethernet-switching, inet, inet6, iso, mpls, vlan classification.

label label

(Optional) Display route entries for the specified label name.

matching ip_prefix

(Optional) Display route entries for the specified IP prefix.

multicast

(Optional) Display route entries for multicast routes.

vpn vpn

(Optional) Display route entries for the specified VPN.

Required Privilege Level

view

Output Fields

Table 1 lists the output fields for the show route forwarding-table command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear. Field names might be abbreviated (as shown in parentheses) when no level of output is specified or when the detail keyword is used instead of the extensive keyword.

Table 1: show route forwarding-table Output Fields

Field Name

Field Description

Level of Output

Routing table

Name of the routing table (for example, inet, inet6, mpls).

All levels

Address family

Address family (for example, IP, IPv6, ISO, MPLS).

All levels

Destination

Destination of the route.

detail, extensive

Route Type (Type)

How the route was placed into the forwarding table. When the detail keyword is used, the route type might be abbreviated (as shown in parentheses):

  • cloned (clon)—(TCP or multicast only) Cloned route.

  • destination (dest)—Remote addresses directly reachable through an interface.

  • destination down (iddn)—Destination route for which the interface is unreachable.

  • interface cloned (ifcl)—Cloned route for which the interface is unreachable.

  • route down (ifdn)—Interface route for which the interface is unreachable.

  • ignore (ignr)—Ignore this route.

  • interface (intf)—Installed as a result of configuring an interface.

  • permanent (perm)—Routes installed by the kernel when the routing table is initialized.

  • user—Routes installed by the routing protocol process or as a result of the configuration.

All levels

Route reference (RtRef)

Number of routes to reference.

detail, extensive

Flags

Route type flags:

  • none—No flags are enabled.

  • accounting—Route has accounting enabled.

  • cached—Cache route.

  • incoming-iface interface-number —Check against incoming interface.

  • prefix load balance—Load balancing is enabled for this prefix.

  • sent to PFE—Route has been sent to the Packet Forwarding Engine.

  • static—Static route.

extensive

Nexthop

IP address of the next hop to the destination.

detail, extensive

Next hop type (Type)

Next-hop type. When the detail keyword is used, the next-hop type might be abbreviated (as indicated in parentheses):

  • broadcast (bcst)—Broadcast.

  • deny—Deny.

  • hold—Next hop is waiting to be resolved into a unicast or multicast type.

  • indexed (idxd)—Indexed next hop.

  • indirect (indr)—Indirect next hop.

  • local (locl)—Local address on an interface.

  • routed multicast (mcrt)—Regular multicast next hop

  • multicast (mcst)—Wire multicast next hop (limited to the LAN).

  • multicast discard (mdsc)—Multicast discard.

  • multicast group (mgrp) —Multicast group member.

  • receive (recv)—Receive.

  • reject (rjct)—Discard. An ICMP unreachable message was sent.

  • resolve (rslv)—Resolving the next hop.

  • unicast (ucst)—Unicast.

  • unilist (ulst)—List of unicast next hops. A packet sent to this next hop goes to any next hop in the list.

detail, extensive

Index

Software index of the next hop that is used to route the traffic for a given prefix.

detail, extensive none

Route interface-index

Logical interface index from which the route is learned. For example, for interface routes, this is the logical interface index of the route itself. For static routes, this field is zero. For routes learned through routing protocols, this is the logical interface index from which the route is learned.

extensive

Reference (NhRef)

Number of routes that refer to this next hop.

none detail, extensive

Next-hop interface (Netif)

Interface used to reach the next hop.

none detail, extensive

Alternate forward nh index

Index number of the alternate next hop interface. Seen with multicast option only.

extensive

Next-hop L3 Interface

The next hop layer 3 interface. This option can be expressed as a VLAN name and is only seen with the multicast option.

extensive

Next-hop L2 Interfaces

The next hop layer 2 interfaces. Seen with multicast option only.

extensive

Sample Output

show route forwarding-table

show route forwarding-table summary

show route forwarding-table extensive

show route forwarding-table ccc

show route forwarding-table family (MPLS)

show route forwarding-table family (IPv6)

show route forwarding-table label

show route forwarding-table matching

show route forwarding-table multicast

Release Information

Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5.