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Troubleshooting the PTX3000

PTX3000 Troubleshooting Resources Overview

To troubleshoot a PTX3000, you use the Junos OS CLI, alarms, devices connected to the alarm relay contacts, and LEDs on both the components and craft interface.

  • LEDs—When the Routing Engine detects an alarm condition, it lights the red or yellow alarm LED on the craft interface as appropriate. In addition, you can also use LEDs on the faceplate of a component and the FANTRAY LEDs on the craft interface to troubleshoot the PTX3000.

  • Alarm devices connected to the alarm relay contact—When a red or yellow alarm occurs, it trips the corresponding alarm relay contact.

  • CLI—The CLI is the primary tool for controlling and troubleshooting hardware, Junos OS, routing protocols, and network connectivity. CLI commands display information from routing tables, information specific to routing protocols, and information about network connectivity derived from the ping and traceroute utilities. For information about using the CLI to troubleshoot Junos OS, see the appropriate Junos OS configuration guide.

  • JTAC—If you need assistance during troubleshooting, you can contact the Juniper Networks Technical Assistance Center (JTAC) by using the Web or by telephone. If you encounter software problems, or problems with hardware components not discussed here, contact JTAC.

PTX3000 LED Overview

Craft Interface LEDs

The craft interface displays system status messages and enables you to troubleshoot the PTX3000. See PTX3000 Craft Interface LEDs.

LEDs on the craft interface include:

  • Red (major) and yellow (minor) alarm LEDs—One large red circular LED and one large yellow triangular LED indicate two levels of alarm conditions. You can determine the cause of the alarm condition by looking at the show chassis alarms command.

  • FANTRAY LEDs—One bicolor green and red LED for each fan tray labeled 0 and 1 that indicates the status of each fan tray.

Component LEDs

The following LEDs are located on various PTX3000 components and display the status of those components:

  • Control Board LEDs—Three LEDs on each Control Board faceplate—ACTIVE, OK, and FAIL— indicate the status of that Control Board. Two port LEDs—HOST/ETHERNET and ACT—indicate the port speed and status. LNK LEDs indicate the status of the clocking ports—BITS A and BITS B.

    See PTX3000 Control Board LEDs.

  • FPC LEDs—Each FPC has a STATUS LED that indicate the status of that FPC.

  • PIC LEDs—Each port on each PIC has an LED that indicates the status of the port.

    See the PTX Series Interface Module Reference.

  • PSM LEDs—Four LEDs on each PSM faceplate—Input () 1, input () 2, OK, and fault ()— indicate the status of that PSM.

    See PTX3000 Power Supply Module LEDs .

  • SIB LEDs—Three LEDs on each SIB faceplate—ACTIVE, OK, and FAIL—indicate the status of that SIB.

    See PTX3000 Switch Interface Board LEDs.

PTX3000 Alarm Messages Overview

When the Routing Engine detects an alarm condition, it lights the red or yellow alarm LED on the craft interface as appropriate and trips the corresponding alarm relay contact. To view a more detailed description of the alarm cause, issue the show chassis alarms CLI command:

Chassis alarm messages indicate a problem with a chassis component such as the cooling system or power supplies.

Troubleshooting the PTX3000 Cooling System

Troubleshooting the PTX3000 Fan Trays

Problem

Description

The following alarms and LEDs indicate a problem with the fan trays:

  • An alarm indicates that a fan failed or a fan tray is missing.

  • An LED for a fan tray on the craft interface is lit red.

In Table 1, the text in the CLI Message column appears in the output of the show chassis alarms command.

Table 1: Fan Tray Alarms

Alarm Type

CLI Message

Alarm Condition

Recovery

Red

fan-name Failure

A fan has failed.

Replace the fan tray.

Too many fans missing or failing

A fan tray is missing or too many fan trays have failed.

Reinstall the fan tray in the chassis.

Yellow

fan-name Removed

A fan tray has been removed.

Reinstall the fan tray in the chassis.

Solution

To troubleshoot the fan trays:

  1. Find the source of the problem by looking at the display on the craft interface. The number of alarm conditions, as well as the source of each alarm, appears on the screen.

  2. Issue the show chassis alarms command to get information about the source of an alarm condition:

  3. If the craft interface display lists only one failed fan and the other fans are functioning normally, the fan is probably faulty and you need to replace the failed fan tray.

  4. Place your hand near the exhaust vents at the rear of the chassis to determine whether the fans are pushing air out of the chassis.

    • Zone 0: The air exhausts from the top rear of the chassis.

    • Zone 1: The exhaust vent is located at the bottom rear of the chassis.

    • Power system: The air exhausts from the rear of the power supply modules (PSMs).

  5. Use the show chassis environment fan command to verify that the status of each fan is OK.

    Note:

    Fan Tray 0 and Fan Tray 1 in the command output cool zone 0 and zone 1, respectively.

  6. Use the show chassis zones command to verify the status of each cooling zone.

  7. Use the show chassis zones detail command to verify the status of each component in cooling zone 0 and cooling zone 1.

Troubleshooting Temperature Alarms

Problem

Description

Yellow (minor) and red (major) alarms indicate that the temperature for a router component exceeds the preconfigured temperature warm or temperature hot threshold. When the temperature of a component exceeds the preconfigured maximum Fire Shutdown threshold, the PTX3000 is powered off immediately.

In Table 2, the text in the CLI Message column appears in the output of the show chassis alarms command.

Table 2: Temperature Alarms

Alarm Type

CLI Message

Alarm Condition

Recovery

Red

Temperature sensor failure

A temperature sensor failed.

Contact JTAC.

cb-number Temperature Hot

The Control Board temperature exceeded the hot temperature threshold. If this condition persists, the Control Board shuts down.

  • Issue the show chassis environment cb slot-number command.

FPC FPC-number PIC PIC-number Temperature Hot

The FPC temperature exceeded the hot temperature threshold. If this condition persists, the FPC shuts down.

  • Issue the show chassis fpc command.

  • Verify that the room temperature is within acceptable limits.

  • Verify that there is sufficient airflow.

  • Verify that the cooling system in the chassis is operating properly.

sib-number Temperature Hot

The SIB temperature exceeded the hot temperature threshold. If this condition persists, the SIB shuts down.

  • Issue the show chassis sib command.

  • Verify that the room temperature is within acceptable limits.

  • Verify that there is sufficient airflow.

  • Verify that the cooling system in the chassis is operating properly.

Yellow

cb-number Temperature Warm

The Control Board temperature exceeded the warm temperature threshold.

  • Issue the show chassis environment cb slot-number command.

  • Verify that the fans have not failed.

  • Verify that fans are running at appropriate speed.

  • Issue the show chassis routing-engine command.

sib-number Temperature Warm

The SIB temperature exceeded the warm temperature threshold.

  • Verify that the fans have not failed.

  • Verify that fans are running at appropriate speed.

  • Issue the show chassis sib command.

  • Verify that there is sufficient airflow to the fan trays.

FPC FPC-number PIC PIC-number Temperature Warm

The FPC temperature exceeded the warm temperature threshold.

  • Verify that the fans have not failed.

  • Verify that fans are running at the appropriate speed.

  • Issue the show chassis fpc command

Solution

To troubleshoot temperature alarms:

  1. Find the source of the problem. Issue the show chassis alarms command to get information about the source of an alarm condition:

  2. Verify that there is sufficient airflow. See PTX3000 Clearance Requirements for Airflow and Hardware Maintenance and Maintaining PTX3000 Cooling System Components.

    Place your hand near the exhaust vents at the rear of the chassis to determine whether the fans are pushing air out of the chassis.

    • Zone 0: The air exhausts from the top rear of the SIBs.

    • Zone 1: The exhaust vent is located at the bottom rear of the chassis.

    • Power system: The air exhausts from the power supply modules (PSMs).

  3. Verify that the cooling system in the chassis is operating properly. See Troubleshooting the PTX3000 Cooling System.

  4. Verify that the room temperature is within acceptable limits. Use the show chassis temperature-thresholds to show the temperature thresholds for various components.

    Note:

    Exhaust A and Exhaust B correspond to temperature sensors located on the Control Boards.

  5. Check the temperature of components that are monitored for temperature alarms by issuing the show chassis environment monitored command. For more information about temperature alarms, see Table 2.

    Verify that the status of each component is OK.

    The output is similar to the following:

    Note:

    Exhaust A, Exhaust B, TLn, TQn, and Exhaust correspond to temperature sensors located on the respective hardware component.

  6. Use the show chassis environment routing-engine command to check the temperature of each Routing Engine.

  7. Use the show chassis environment cb command to check the temperature of each Control Board.

    Note:

    Exhaust A and Exhaust B correspond to temperature sensors located on the Control Boards.

  8. Use the show chassis environment sib command to check the temperature of each SIB.

    Note:

    Intake, Exhaust, and Junction correspond to temperature sensors located on the SIBs.

  9. Use the show chassis environment fpc command to check the temperature of each FPC.

    Note:

    PMB, Intake, Exhaust A, Exhaust B, TLn, and TQn correspond to temperature sensors located on the FPCs.

  10. Use the show chassis environment command to verify that the status of each component is OK.

    Note:

    Exhaust A, Exhaust B, TLn, TQn, Intake, and Exhaust correspond to temperature sensors located on the respective hardware component.

Troubleshooting the PTX3000 Power Supply Modules

Problem

Description

The following alarms and LEDs indicate a problem with the power supply modules during normal operations:

  • One or both of the green input 1 and input 2 LEDs are off, indicating that the input is not receiving voltage.

  • The green OK LED on a PSM is off when a PSM output has failed or is not receiving voltage, or the PSM power switch is on standby.

  • The fault () LED on a PSM is lit when a PSM has failed, is not properly installed, or is not receiving sufficient voltage.

In Table 3, the text in the CLI Message column appears in the output of the show chassis alarms command.

Table 3: PSM Alarms

Alarm Type

CLI Message

Alarm Condition

Recovery

Red (major)

PSM psm-number Not OK

The specified PSM has failed. An input might be bad, or the input might be incorrectly connected. The PSM or the chassis might have exceeded the temperature thresholds, a fan might have failed, and so on.

  1. Use the show chassis environment psm for more information about the failure.

  2. Check that the inputs for the PSM are correctly connected.

  3. Reinstall the PSM to clear alarms.

  4. If the input is correctly connected, replace the PSM.

PSM psm-number Not Recognized

The PTX3000 does not support the power supply module.

Replace the PSM with a supported PSM.

No Redundant Power for FPC

One or more FPCs do not have redundant power supply modules. See Table 4. If nonredundant PSMs that provide power to the FPCs fail, the FPCs will lose service.

If the minimum number of required PSM are not installed as indicated in PTX3000 Power System Description:

  • Verify that both inputs on the PSMs are connected and operational.

  • Install the required PSM.

  • Remove FPCs and PICs.

If a PSM fails, fix or replace the PSM.

Table 4: Minimum Number of Power Supply Modules for Nonredundant Power

Number of PSMs

Nonredundant Power to the FPCs and PICs

1

Nonredundant power to a maximum of one FPC and one PIC

2

Nonredundant power to a maximum of four FPCs and four PICs

3 to 5

Nonredundant power to a maximum of eight FPCs and eight PICs

Solution

To troubleshoot a PSM:

  1. Issue the show chassis alarms command to check for alarms.

  2. Issue the show chassis power command to check the power usage in watts for all PSMs.

  3. Issue the show chassis power detail command to check the power usage in watts for hardware components such as FPCs, fan trays, Routing Engines, Control Boards, SIBs, and craft interface.

  4. If you cannot determine the cause of the problem or need additional assistance, contact JTAC.

Troubleshooting the PTX3000 Routing Engines

Problem

Description

The following indicate a problem with the Routing Engine:

  • An alarm indicates that a host subsystem has been removed or failed.

  • The ONLINE LED on the Routing Engine faceplate is lit steadily red.

Solution

  1. Issue the show chassis alarms command to check for alarms.

  2. Check the ONLINE LED on the Routing Engine faceplate. If the ONLINE LED is red, issue the chassis routing-engine command to check the status of the Routing Engine.

  3. Use the show chassis alarms command to display Routing Engine alarms.

Troubleshooting the PTX3000 Control Boards

Problem

Description

The following alarms and LEDs indicate a problem with a Control Board:

  • A red (major) alarm indicates that the Control Board has failed or has been removed.

  • A yellow (minor) alarm indicates that the Ethernet switch in the Control Board has failed.

  • The yellow FAIL LED on the Control Board faceplate is lit.

  • The green OK LED on the Control Board faceplate is not lit.

  • The red host subsystem FAIL LED on the craft interface is lit.

  • The green host subsystem OK LED on the craft interface is not lit.

In Table 5, the text in the CLI Message column appears in the output of the show chassis alarms command.

Table 5: Chassis Alarm Messages for the Control Boards

Alarm Type

CLI Message

Alarm Condition

Recovery

Red

CB cb-number Failure

A Control Board failed.

Replace the Control Board.

CB cb-number Removed

A Control Board has been removed.

Reinstall the Control Board.

 

CCG CCG-number External-A LOS

On the BITS A port configured to be the primary or secondary clocking source, loss of signal has occurred.

Reconnect the cable to the port.

 

CCG CCG-number External-B LOS

On the BITS B port configured to be the primary or secondary clocking source, loss of signal has occurred.

Reconnect the cable to the port.

Yellow

CB cb-number Ethernet Switch Failure

The Ethernet switch on the Control Board has failed.

Replace the Control Board.

In Table 6, the text in the CLI Message column appears in the output of the show chassis alarms command.

Table 6: Chassis Alarm Messages for Host Subsystems

Alarm Type

CLI Message

Red

Host host-number Removed

Yellow

Host host-number Failure

Solution

To troubleshoot the Control Boards:

  1. Check the LEDs on the faceplate of each Control Board.

  2. Use the CLI to check for alarms. Issue the show chassis alarms command to view the alarms.

  3. Issue the show chassis environment cb command.

Troubleshooting the PTX3000 RCBs

Problem

Description

The following indicate a problem with the Routing and Control Board:

  • An alarm indicates that a host subsystem has been removed or failed.

  • A red (major) alarm indicates that the RCB has failed.

  • A yellow (minor) alarm indicates the following fault conditions:

    • The RCB has been removed.

    • The Ethernet switch in the RCB has failed.

    • Over-voltage threshold has occurred.

    • Over-temperature threshold has been reached.

    • Clock failure has occurred.

  • The green OK LED on the RCB faceplate is not lit.

    Note:

    The green OK LED on the RCB faceplate is not lit when the RCB is taken offline by the user.

In Table 7, the text in the CLI Message column appears in the output of the show chassis alarms command.

Table 7: Chassis Alarm Messages for the Routing and Control Board

Alarm Type

CLI Message

Alarm Condition

Recovery

Major

VMHost RE Secure Boot Disabled

Secure Boot is not enabled on the RCB.

On the console connected to the RCB:

  1. Reboot the RCB by using the request vmhost reboot command.

  2. Press Esc to go to the BIOS setup menu.

  3. Under the Administer Secure Boot menu, click Secure Boot to enable it. Save the BIOS change and reboot.

Minor

VMHost RE Secure BIOS Version Mismatch

The BIOS version in the BIOSFlash and the jfirmware do not match.

Upgrade the BIOS version by adding the appropriate jfirmware package and then reboot the RCB.

Minor

Host x disk drive y smart error

RCB booted from the alternative SSD.

Replace the disk with the disk that is similar to junos smartd disk.

Minor

VMHost x Boot from alternate disk

RCB booted from Alternate software set.

Make a snapshot recovery so that the primary disk can be recovered.

Minor

VMHost x Boot from alternate set

RCB booted from Alternate software set

Reinstall the image so that primary partition is recovered.

Minor

VMHost RE x host application failed

At least one of the VM host daemons has failed.

Reinstall Junos  OS.

Major (companion card)

RCB-CC 0 Absent/Powered Off

RCB companion card has been removed.

Install the companion card.

Red

CB cb-number Failure

A Control Board failed.

Replace the Routing Engine-Control Board.

CB cb-number Removed

A Control Board has been removed.

Reinstall the RCB.

CB cb-number GPS gps-numberSignal Lost

Loss of signal has occurred on the specific GPS port.

Reconnect the GPS cable.

CCG CCG-number External-A LOS

On the BITS A port configured to be the primary or secondary clocking source, loss of signal has occurred.

Reconnect the cable to the port.

CCG CCG-number External-B LOS

On the BITS B port configured to be the primary or secondary clocking source, loss of signal has occurred.

Reconnect the cable to the port.

Yellow

CB x ESW PFE Port Fail

One or more (or all) ports of the Ethernet Switch on the RCB are down.

If only one port has a failure, check if the corresponding FPC has a problem.

Replace the RCB if multiple or all ports of the switch have failed.

  • Remove the RCB and re-install it.

CB x ESW NON-PFE Port Fail

Note:

When you bring one of the RCBs offline by using the request chassis cb slot slot-number offline command, the request vmhost power-off other routing-engine command is triggered and a graceful shutdown of the VM host occurs. As a result, you cannot run the request vmhost power-off other routing-engine and request chassis cb slot slot-number offline commands on the other Routing Engine as it is not reachable.

Table 8 lists the possible Routing Engine switchover conditions when RCB0 is the primary Routing Engine and RCB1 is the backup Routing Engine.

Table 8: Routing Engine Switchover Conditions

Command/Action

RCB0 State

RCB1 State

Description

request vmhost power-off other-routing-engine

Online Primary

Offline

RCB0 shuts down the other routing engine, RCB1.

request vmhost halt other-routing-engine

Online Primary

Online Standby

RCB0 halts the VM host on RCB1. RCB1 is in standby mode. To power off RCB1, you must use the request chassis cb slot1 offline command.

request chassis cb offline slot 1

Online Primary

Offline

RCB1 is powered off from RCB0.

CB1 button press

Online Primary

Offline

RCB1 is powered off.

request vmhost power-off

Offline

Online Primary

RCB0 is powered off and RCB1 is the primary. Thus graceful Routing Engine switchover occurs.

request vmhost halt

Online Standby

Online Primary

RCB0 is in standby mode and RCB1 becomes the primary. Thus graceful Routing Engine switchover occurs.

CB0 button press

Offline

Online Primary

RCB0 is powered off and RCB1 is the primary. Thus graceful Routing Engine switchover occurs.

If the other Routing Engine is not in power-off or halted state, but in an error condition, graceful Routing Engine switchover is not possible using the CLI. This error condition needs manual intervention to ensure that backup Routing Engine is ready to acquire the primary role.

Note:

Graceful Routing Engine Switchover (GRES) between the RE-DUO-C2600-16G Routing Engine and the RCB is not supported as both the Routing Engines are running on different software. The RE-DUO-C2600-16G Routing Engine runs on Junos OS and the RCB works on Junos OS running as a virtual machine over a Linux-based host (VM host).

Note:

The connection between the RCB and the backplane is configured to work at 10GBASE-KR. If a switchover happens between the RE-DUO-C2600-16G Routing Engine and the RCB, the newly-installed RCB is able to connect to the other RCB over 10-Gigabit Ethernet links on the backplane.

Solution

  1. Issue the show chassis alarms command to check for alarms.

  2. Check the ONLINE LED on the Routing Engine-Control Board faceplate. If the ONLINE LED is red, issue the chassis routing-engine command to check the status of the RCB.

  3. Use the show chassis alarms command to display Routing Engine alarms.

If the SSDs do not have a valid Junos OS image, use a USB disk to install an image on the SSDs.

Note:

The Routing and Control Board has a battery which is discharged only when the board is powered off, and the battery has a life of 3.6 years. Therefore, a board which has been powered off either continuously or cumulatively for 3 years or more is at risk of suffering a dead battery. This results in the Real Time Clock (RTC) getting reset and the BIOS setting such as the boot order stored in the CMOS getting cleared.

Troubleshooting the RCB Companion Card

Problem

Description

The following indicate a problem with the RCB companion card:

  • STATUS LED on the companion card is off.

  • The Fru Absent alarm message indicates the absence of the companion card. See Table 9.

Table 9: Chassis Alarm Messages for the RCB Companion Card

Alarm Type

CLI Message

Alarm Condition

Recovery

Minor (companion card)

Fru Absent alarm

Companion card is absent.

Install the companion card.

Troubleshooting the PTX3000 Switch Interface Boards

Problem

Description

The following LED states and alarms indicate a problem with a SIB:

Table 10 describes the SIB LED trouble states.

Table 10: Troubleshooting SIB LEDs

Label

Color

State

Description

OK

Off

SIB is offline or not seated properly.

FAIL

Yellow

On steadily

SIB has failed.

In Table 11, the text in the CLI Message column appears in the output from the show chassis alarms command.

Table 11: Troubleshooting SIB Alarms

Alarm Type

CLI Message

Alarm Condition

Recovery

Red (major)

SIB sib-number Fault

A SIB has failed. This might affect traffic-forwarding capacity.

Restart the SIB. If this does not fix the issue, contact JTAC.

Yellow (minor)

SIB sib-number FPC Link Error

The SIB has detected link errors between the SIB and FPCs. This error may affect FPC traffic forwarding.

To isolate the problem:

  1. Replace the SIB and then the FPC. This may affect the traffic.

  2. If the problem persists, replace the SIB.

  3. If the problem still persists, replace the particular FPC that was associated with the link error.

  4. If you are unable to isolate the problem, contact JTAC. JTAC has to analyze the logs to determine further action.

SIB sib-number Cell Drop error

The SIB has detected fabric cell drops. This might affect traffic-forwarding capacity

Restart the SIB. If this does not fix the issue, contact JTAC.

SIB sib-number Not Online

The SIB is not in an active state. This might affect the traffic-forwarding capacity.

Bring the SIB online. Issue the request chassis sib online slot slot-number command. If this does not fix the issue, contact JTAC.

SIB sib-number Absent

A SIB has been removed.

Reinstall the SIB in the chassis.

Solution

To troubleshoot the SIBs:

  1. Note the status of the LEDs on the faceplate of each SIB.

  2. Verify that the SIB is properly seated in the backplane. Check that each ejector handle has been latched firmly.

  3. Use the CLI to check for alarms. Issue the show chassis alarms command to view the alarms.

  4. Check the status of the SIBs. Issue the show chassis sib and show chassis environment sib commands.

  5. Use the information gathered in the previous steps with the information in Table 10 and Table 11 to determine the proper course of action.

Troubleshooting the PTX3000 Switch Fabric

Problem

Description

The switching plane in the PTX3000 consists of the SIBs and the FPCs. A link that is in a down or error state indicates a problem with the switching planes.

Solution

To troubleshoot the switching planes:

  1. Verify that all nine SIBs and all installed FPCs are online. Use the show chassis fabric summary command to check for errors.

    If a SIB or FPC is Offline, see Troubleshooting the PTX3000 FPCs and Troubleshooting the PTX3000 Switch Interface Boards to correct the problem before proceeding.

  2. Use the show chassis fabric topology command to query the state of the links.

    If the state of the link is Error replace the FPC and SIB to determine whether the error still occurs.

    Tip:

    Use the show chassis fabric topology | match error command to quickly isolate errors.

  3. Display the system log messages to obtain information about link failures. The /var/log/messages file is a commonly configured destination for system log messages. To display this file, issue the show log command. For example:

    For more information about system log messages, see the System Log Explorer.

    Your customer support representative can assist you with using the information in the system log to determine whether you have a faulty SIB or FPC.

Troubleshooting the PTX3000 FPCs

Problem

Description

The following LED states and alarms indicate a problem with an FPC:

  • The STATUS LED on the FPC is lit steadily red.

  • The STATUS LED on the FPC is not lit.

Table 12 describes the FPC LED trouble states.

Table 12: Troubleshooting FPC LEDs

Label

Color

State

Description

STATUS

Red

On steadily

FPC has failed.

Off

FPC is offline.

In Table 13, the text in the “CLI Message column” appears in the output of the show chassis alarms command.

Table 13: Troubleshooting FPC Alarms

Alarm Type

CLI Message

Alarm Condition

Recovery

Yellow (minor)

Power Budget: No redundant power

One or more FPCs do not have redundant power. If the PSM that provides power to the FPCs fails, the FPCs will lose service.

Verify the minimum number of required PSMs are installed as indicated in PTX3000 Power System Description. If necessary, install an additional PSM, or replace a failed PSM, or uninstall FPCs and PICs until you reach the number of FPCs your PSMs can support.

Solution

To troubleshoot an FPC:

  1. Note the STATUS LED state.

  2. Verify that the FPC is properly seated in the backplane. Check that each ejector handle has been latched firmly.

  3. Use the CLI to check for alarms. Issue the show chassis alarms command to view the alarms.

  4. Check the status of an FPC by using the following CLI command:

  5. Use the following option to display more detailed information:

    The following examples also specify a slot number, which is optional:

  6. Use the show chassis fabric summary command to check the switch fabric.

  7. Use the information gathered in the previous steps with the information in Table 12 and Table 13 to determine the proper course of action.

Troubleshooting the PTX3000 PICs and PIC Cables

Problem

Description

A PIC LED lit red indicates a problem with the PIC.

Solution

To troubleshoot a PIC:

  1. Check the status of the PIC and each PIC port. Look at the LEDs located on the PIC faceplate. For information about the meaning of LED states on different PICs, see the PTX Series Interface Module Reference.

  2. Check the status of a PIC, issuing the show chassis fpc pic-status CLI command. In the CLI, all PICs are shown as PIC 0.

Troubleshooting the PTX3000 IPLCs

Problem

Description

The following LED states and alarms indicate a problem with an IPLC:

  • The STATUS LED on the IPLC is lit steadily red.

  • The STATUS LED on the IPLC is not lit.

Table 14 describes the IPLC LED trouble states.

Table 14: Troubleshooting IPLC LED

Label

Color

State

Description

STATUS

Red

On steadily

IPLC has failed.

Off

IPLC is offline.

Solution

To troubleshoot an IPLC:

  1. Note the state of the STATUS LED.

  2. Verify that the IPLC is properly seated in the backplane. Check that each ejector handle has been latched firmly.

  3. Use the IPLC to check for alarms. Issue the show chassis fpc optical properties alarms fpc-slot fpc-slot command to view the optical module alarms.

  4. Check the status of an IPLC by using the following CLI command:

  5. Use the following option to display more detailed information:

    The following example also specifies a slot number, which is optional:

  6. Use the information gathered in the previous steps with the information in Table 14 to determine the proper course of action.