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Troubleshooting the MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80

Troubleshooting Resources for MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 Routers

Command-Line Interface

The Junos OS command-line interface (CLI) is the primary tool for controlling and troubleshooting router hardware, the Junos OS, routing protocols, and network connectivity. CLI commands display information from routing tables, information specific to routing protocols, and information about network connectivity derived from the ping and traceroute utilities.

You enter CLI commands on one or more external management devices connected to ports on the front panel.

For information about using the CLI to troubleshoot the Junos OS, see the appropriate Junos OS configuration guide.

Chassis and Interface Alarm Messages

When the Routing Engine detects an alarm condition, it lights the red or yellow alarm LED on the front panel as appropriate. To view a more detailed description of the alarm cause, issue the show chassis alarms command:

There are two classes of alarm messages:

  • Chassis alarms—Indicate a problem with a chassis component such as the cooling system or power supplies.

  • Interface alarms—Indicate a problem with a specific network interface.

Front Panel LEDs

The front panel on the router contains LEDs and buttons that allow you to troubleshoot the router.

LEDs on the front panel include the following:

  • Alarm LEDs—Two LEDs located on the left side of the front panel indicate critical and warning alarms on the router. The circular LED lights red to indicate a critical condition that can result in a system shutdown. The triangular LED lights yellow to indicate a less severe condition that requires monitoring or maintenance.

  • System LED—One LED on the left side of the front panel indicates the status of the router. The LED is located below the SYS OK label. The LED lights steadily green when the router is functioning normally and blinks green when the router is transitioning online.

  • Routing Engine LED—One bicolor LED on the left side of the front panel indicates the status of the Routing Engine. The LED is located below the RE label. The LED is lit steadily green when the Routing Engine is functioning normally and is lit red when the Routing Engine has failed.

  • Link LEDs—Four LEDs, labeled LINK, indicate the status of the ports for the fixed 10-Gigabit Ethernet MIC. The LED is green when the link is up, and is off when there is no link. The LINK LEDs are located to the right of the port on the front panel.

Component LEDs

The following LEDs are located on various router components and display the status of those components:

  • MIC LEDs—One LED, labeled OK/FAIL, on each MIC faceplate indicates the MIC’s status. For more information, see the MX Series Interface Module Reference. On the fixed MX80 router, each RJ-45 port has an additional link LED. The LED is green when the link is up and is off when there is no link.

  • Power supply LEDs—One bicolor LED, on each power supply faceplate indicates the status of that power supply. The LED is lit blue when the power supply is functioning normally and is blinking red when the power supply has failed.

Troubleshooting the MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 Fan Tray

Problem

Description

The fans in the fan tray are not functioning normally.

Solution

Follow these guidelines to troubleshoot the fans:

  • Check the alarm LEDs on the front panel.

  • Issue the show chassis fan command to get status information about the fans.

  • If the red alarm LED on the front panel lights, issue the show chassis alarms command to get information about the source of an alarm condition.

    If the CLI output lists only one fan failure, and the other fans are functioning normally, the fan is most likely faulty and you must replace the fan tray.

  • Place your hand near the exhaust vents at the side of the chassis to determine whether the fans are pushing air out of the chassis.

  • If a fan tray is removed, a yellow alarm and a red alarm occur.

  • The following conditions automatically cause the fans to run at full speed and also trigger the indicated alarm:

    • A fan fails (red alarm).

    • The router temperature exceeds the “temperature warm” threshold (yellow alarm).

    • The temperature of the router exceeds the maximum “temperature hot” threshold (red alarm and automatic shutdown of the power supplies).

    To view the temperature threshold settings, issue the show chassis temperature-thresholds command.

Troubleshooting the MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 MICs

Problem

Description

The MICs are not functioning normally.

Solution

  • Check the status of each port on a MIC by looking at the LED located on the MIC faceplate. For information about the meaning of LED states on different MICs, see the MX Series Interface Module Reference.

  • Check the status of a MIC by issuing the show chassis fpc pic-status CLI command. The MIC slots in the MX5, MX10, MX40, and modular MX80 router are labeled 1/MIC 0 and 1/MIC 1. The fixed MIC is labeled 0/MIC 0.

    For further description of the output from the command, see the CLI Explorer.

Troubleshooting the MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 Power Supplies

Problem

Description

The power supply is not functioning normally.

Solution

  • Check the LEDs on each power supply faceplate. If a power supply is correctly installed and functioning normally, the status LED on the power supply lights green steadily.

  • Issue the CLI show chassis environment pem command to check the status of installed power supplies. As shown in the sample output, the value Online in the rows labeled State indicates that each of the power supplies is functioning normally:

  • If a red alarm condition occurs, issue the show chassis alarms command to determine the source of the problem.

  • If all power supplies have failed, the system temperature might have exceeded the threshold, causing the system to shut down.

    Note:

    If the system temperature exceeds the threshold, the Junos OS shuts down all power supplies so that no status is displayed.

    The Junos OS also can shut down one of the power supplies for other reasons. In this case, the remaining power supplies provide power to the router, and you can still view the system status through the CLI or display.

  • Check that the AC input switch or DC circuit breaker is in the on ( | ) position and is receiving power.

  • Verify that the source circuit breaker has the proper current rating. Each power supply must be connected to a separate source circuit breaker.

  • Verify that the AC power cord or DC power cables from the power source to the router are not damaged. If the insulation is cracked or broken, immediately replace the cord or cable.

  • Connect the power supply to a different power source with a new power cord or power cables. If the power supply status LED indicates that the power supply is not operating normally, the power supply is the source of the problem. Replace the power supply with a spare.

Note:

If the cause of power failure is due to lightening, power off the power supply module and then power it on again. If the power supply module is working properly, it comes back with its LED in the green state. If there are no abnormal causes for the power supply module failure, or if the power supply module LED is still red after powering off and powering on again, then try reseating the power supply module and if it does not work, then try to install it in a different slot.