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Managing Programs and Processes Using JUNOS Operational Mode Commands

This topic shows some examples of JUNOS operational commands that you can use to manage programs and processes on a device running JUNOS Software.

Sections include:

Showing Software Processes

To verify system operation or to begin diagnosing an error condition, you may need to display information about software processes running on the router.

To show software processes:

  1. Make sure you are in operational mode.
  2. Type the show system processes extensive command. This command shows the CPU utilization on the router and lists the processes in order of CPU utilization. For example:

    user@host> show system processes extensive
        
    last pid: 28689;  load averages:  0.01,  0.00,  0.00  up 56+06:16:13    04:52:04
    73 processes:  1 running, 72 sleeping
    
    Mem: 101M Active, 101M Inact, 98M Wired, 159M Cache, 69M Buf, 286M Free
    Swap: 1536M Total, 1536M Free
    
    
      PID USERNAME    PRI NICE  SIZE    RES STATE    TIME   WCPU    CPU COMMAND
     3365 root          2   0 21408K  4464K select 511:23  0.00%  0.00% chassisd
     3508 root          2   0  3352K  1168K select  32:45  0.00%  0.00% l2ald
     3525 root          2   0  3904K  1620K select  13:40  0.00%  0.00% dcd
     5532 root          2   0 11660K  2856K kqread  10:36  0.00%  0.00% rpd
     3366 root          2   0  2080K   828K select   8:33  0.00%  0.00% alarmd
     3529 root          2   0  2040K   428K select   7:32  0.00%  0.00% irsd
     3375 root          2   0  2900K  1600K select   6:01  0.00%  0.00% ppmd
     3506 root          2   0  5176K  2568K select   5:38  0.00%  0.00% mib2d
     4957 root          2   0  1284K   624K select   5:16  0.00%  0.00% ntpd
        6 root         18   0     0K     0K syncer   4:49  0.00%  0.00% syncer
     3521 root          2   0  2312K   928K select   2:14  0.00%  0.00% lfmd
     3526 root          2   0  5192K  1988K select   2:04  0.00%  0.00% snmpd
     3543 root          2   0     0K     0K peer_s   1:46  0.00%  0.00% peer proxy
     3512 root          2   0  3472K  1044K select   1:44  0.00%  0.00% rmopd
     3537 root          2   0     0K     0K peer_s   1:30  0.00%  0.00% peer proxy
     3527 root          2   0  3100K  1176K select   1:14  0.00%  0.00% pfed
     3380 root          2   0  3208K  1052K select   1:11  0.00%  0.00% bfdd
     4136 root          2   0 11252K  3668K select   0:54  0.00%  0.00% cli
     3280 root          2   0  2248K  1420K select   0:28  0.00%  0.00% eventd
     3528 root          2   0  2708K   672K select   0:28  0.00%  0.00% dfwd
        7 root         -2   0     0K     0K vlruwt   0:26  0.00%  0.00% vnlru
     3371 root          2   0  1024K   216K sbwait   0:25  0.00%  0.00% tnp.sntpd
       13 root        -18   0     0K     0K psleep   0:24  0.00%  0.00% vmuncacheda
     3376 root          2   0  1228K   672K select   0:22  0.00%  0.00% smartd
        5 root        -18   0     0K     0K psleep   0:17  0.00%  0.00% bufdaemon
     3368 root          2   0 15648K  9428K select   0:17  0.00%  0.00% mgd
     3362 root          2   0  1020K   204K select   0:15  0.00%  0.00% watchdog
     3381 root          2   0  2124K   808K select   0:15  0.00%  0.00% lacpd
     3524 root          2   0  6276K  1492K select   0:14  0.00%  0.00% kmd
     3343 root         10   0  1156K   404K nanslp   0:14  0.00%  0.00% cron
    ---(more)---

Table 1 lists and describes the output fields included in this example. The fields are listed in alphabetical order.

Table 1: show system process extensive Command Output Fields

Field

Description

COMMAND

Command that is running.

CPU

Raw (unweighted) CPU usage. The value of this field is used to sort the processes in the output.

last pid

Last process identifier assigned to the process.

load averages

Three load averages, followed by the current time.

Mem

Information about physical and virtual memory allocation.

NICE

UNIX “nice” value. The nice value allows a process to change its final scheduling priority.

PID

Process identifier.

PRI

Current kernel scheduling priority of the process. A lower number indicates a higher priority.

processes

Number of existing processes and the number of processes in each state (sleeping, running, starting, zombies, and stopped).

RES

Current amount of resident memory, in KB.

SIZE

Total size of the process (text, data, and stack), in KB.

STATE

Current state of the process (sleep, wait, run, idle, zombi, or stop).

Swap

Information about physical and virtual memory allocation.

USERNAME

Owner of the process.

WCPU

Weighted CPU usage.

Restarting a JUNOS Software Process

To correct an error condition, you might need to restart a software process running on the router. You can use the restart command to force a restart of a software process.

Caution: Do not restart a software process unless specifically asked to do so by your Juniper Networks customer support representative. Restarting a software process during normal operation of a router could cause interruption of packet forwarding and loss of data.

To restart a software process:

  1. Make sure you are in operational mode.
  2. Type the following command:
    user@host> restart process-name < (immediately | gracefully | soft) >
    • process-name is the name of the process that you want to restart. For example, routing or class-of-service. You can use the command completion feature of JUNOS Software to see a list of software processes that you can restart using this command.
    • gracefully restarts the software process after performing clean-up tasks.
    • immediately restarts the software process without performing any clean-up tasks.
    • soft rereads and reactivates the configuration without completely restarting the software processes. For example, BGP peers stay up and the routing table stays constant.

The following example shows how to restart the routing process:

user@host> restart routing Routing protocol daemon started, pid 751

When a process restarts, the process identifer (PID) is updated. (See Figure 1.)

Figure 1: Restarting a Process

Image g016768.gif

Stopping the JUNOS Software

To avoid damage to the file system, you must gracefully shut down JUNOS Software before powering off the router.

To stop JUNOS Software:

  1. Make sure you are in operational mode.
  2. Enter the request system halt command. This command stops all system processes and halts the operating system. For example:

    user@host> request system halt
    Halt the system? [yes,no] (no)  yes  
    shutdown: [pid 3110]
    Shutdown NOW!
    *** FINAL System shutdown message from root@host *** 
    System going down IMMEDIATELY 
    user@host> Dec 17 17:28:40 init: syslogd (PID 2514) exited with status=0 Normal Exit
    Waiting (max 60 seconds) for system process `bufdaemon' to stop...stopped
    Waiting (max 60 seconds) for system process `syncer' to stop...stopped 
    syncing disks... 4 
    done
    Uptime: 3h31m41s
    ata0: resetting devices.. done 
    The operating system has halted.
    Please press any key to reboot. 
    

Rebooting the JUNOS Software

After a software upgrade or to recover (occasionally) from an error condition, you must reboot JUNOS Software.

To reboot the JUNOS Software:

  1. Make sure you are in operational mode.
  2. Enter the request system reboot command. This command displays the final stages of the system shutdown and executes the reboot. Reboot requests are recorded to the system log files, which you can view with the show log messages command. For example:

    user@host>request system rebootReboot the system? [yes,no] (no)yes
    shutdown: [pid 845]
    Shutdown NOW! 
    *** FINAL System shutdown message from root@host *** 
    System going down IMMEDIATELY 
    user@host> Dec 17 17:34:20 init: syslogd (PID 409) exited with status=0 Normal Exit
    Waiting (max 60 seconds) for system process `bufdaemon' to stop...stopped
    Waiting (max 60 seconds) for system process `syncer' to stop...stopped 
    syncing disks... 10 6 
    done
    Uptime: 2m45s
    ata0: resetting devices.. done
    Rebooting... 
    


Published: 2010-04-27

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