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Symbols  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W

 

Symbols

10/100Base-T port    12
–48 VDC power    1234
 

A

abnormal LED activity    12
access, management    12
setting up console    12
SNMP    12
Telnet setup
accessing, fan tray
adapters, I/O    12
agency certification    1234
air filter    1
maintaining
replacing
airflow    1
rack-mounted installation and
specifications    12
alarm ports
amperage    12
antistatic bags and containers
assembly numbers, locating
assigning an IP address
auxiliary port    12
 

B

bays, upper and lower, right and left    123
BNC connector
booting    
LED activity
 

C

cable management bracket
cables    
connecting
failure
IOA module
pinouts
power distribution unit
recommendations
required
SRP IOA    12
cabling    
SRP IOA
cabling router
cabling SRP IOA
Case Manager
certification    1234
chassis
circulation, air
classification, packet
cleaning the router
CLI (command-line interface)
clock source input ports
clocking problems
command-line interface
compliance    
product reclamation and recycling
regulatory
components    
returning    12
storing
configuring cables    12
configuring management access
configuring Telnet
connecting console to the router
connectors, pinouts
console    
for management access    12
ports    
10/100Base-T
RS-232
console port    12
consumption, power    12
conventions    
notice icons
text and syntax
cooling system    
air filter, maintaining
crossover cable
current (electrical) requirements    12
customer support    12
contacting JTAC
 

D

damaged components, returning
DB-9 connector    12
DC power    123
detecting double-bit error
diagnosing problems
diagnostic LEDs
dimensions of E120 router
dimensions of E320 router
dissipation, heat    12
distribution rack    12
documentation set    
comments on
double-bit errors    
detecting
troubleshooting
 

E

E120 router    
assigning IP address to
cabling
cabling recommendations
cleaning
dimensions
electrical requirements
environmental requirements
equipment rack requirements
Ethernet cable
installing
installing modules
lifting
management access
mechanical requirements
modules
power requirements
powering down
powering up
safety guidelines
site planning
slot numbering
space requirements    12
troubleshooting    12
unpacking
views
E320 router    
assigning IP address to
cabling
cabling recommendations
cleaning
dimensions
electrical requirements
environmental requirements
equipment rack requirements
Ethernet cable
installing
installing modules
lifting
management access
mechanical requirements
modules
power requirements
powering down
powering up
safety guidelines
site planning
slot numbering
space requirements    12
troubleshooting    12
unpacking
views
EIA distribution rack
ejectors, module
electrical requirements    12
electronic equipment, recycling
electrostatic discharge, precautions
environmental requirements
ESD grounding jack
Ethernet link
external timing ports
 

F

fabric slices
failover, SRP modules
failures    
fans
general
FAN FAIL LED
FAN OK LED
fan tray    1
hot-swapping
fans    
failure    12
installing
location
redundancy
removing
status
far end receive failure
FERF (far end receive failure)
filter, air
flash cards    1
redundancy
 

G

Global Configuration mode
ground wires required
grounding jacks
 

H

halt command    12
hardware    
cable configuration    12
reclamation and recycling
redundancy features
repairing and replacing
hazardous materials, reclamation and recycling
heat dissipation    123
high-availability mode
hot-swapping fan trays
hot-swapping modules
humidity requirements    12
HyperTerminal
 

I

I/O adapter    12
installing IOA shelf
installing modules    
IOAs
line modules
order of installation
SFM modules
slot numbering
SRP IOA
SRP modules
installing NVS cards    1
installing router    1
site planning
installing SFPs
IOA module    12
cables
combinations of
installing
removing
SFPs
SRP
IOA shelf    1
installing
IP address, assigning
 

J

JTAC, contacting
 

L

lead in equipment, reclamation and recycling
LEDs    1
abnormal activity    12
fans
normal activity
lifting router
Line Configuration mode
line modules    12
installing
LEDs
pairing with other modules
removing
slot numbering
LM (line module)
location, for routers
 

M

maintenance, system
management    
ports    
10/100Base-T
auxiliary
RS-232
management access    12
setting up console    12
SNMP    12
Telnet setup
Management Information Bases
management port
managing modules
manuals    
comments on
mechanical requirements for distribution rack
MIBs (Management Information Bases)
module reset button
modules    1
failure
hot-swapping
installing    12
order of installation
IOAs
line
managing
removing
repairing and replacing
replacing
resetting
self-testing
SFM
SRP
storing
monitoring LEDs
monitoring temperature
mounting kits
mounting posts for rack
 

N

network management    12
setting up console    12
SNMP    12
Telnet setup
network timing ports
NMI button
nonvolatile storage
notice icons
NVS cards    1
installing    12
redundancy
storing
 

O

order of module installation
 

P

packaging, recycling
packet classification
packing instructions
passwords, Telnet
PC-CARD
PCMCIA slot, SRP modules
PDU    1
cabling
replacing
pinouts, E Series router cables and connectors
planning site for installation
plenum
ports    
alarm
console
external timing
status LEDs
power    
cabling power distribution unit    12
consumption, system    12
dissipation    12
failures    12
problems
source A
source B
specifications    12
power distribution unit    
replacing
Power Distribution Unit (PDU)
power input module, cabling
power switches    12
powering down router
powering up router
preinstallation responsibilities
preparing site for installation
Privileged Exec command mode
problems
product numbers, locating
 

Q

QoS, packet classification for
 

R

rack, distribution
reclamation and recycling
recycling Juniper Networks equipment
redundancy    1
fans
NVS cards
power
SRP module
regulatory requirements
release mechanisms for SFPs
removing components
removing modules
removing SFPs
repacking components
repairing hardware components
replacing components
replacing modules
replacing NVS cards    123
replacing SFPs    12
reset button
resetting modules
Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive, recycling equipment
Return Materials Authorization
returning product
RJ-45 connector    12
RMA (Return Materials Authorization)
RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances) Directive, recycling equipment
RS-232 port    12345
 

S

safety    
agency certification    12
guidelines
self-testing, modules
serial numbers, locating
SFM (switch fabric module)    12
installing
removing
switch fabric slice
SFPs (small form-factor pluggable transceivers)    12
installing
removing
storing
show interface command
show version command    1234567
single-bit errors
site planning
size    
of E120 router
of E320 router
of rack
slices, fabric
slot combinations    12
slot disable command
slot groups    1
overloading
slot numbering    12
small form-factor pluggable transceivers
SNMP for management access    12
space requirements    1234
specifications    
airflow    12
dimensions    12
distribution rack
electrical    12
heat dissipation    12
space    12
weight    12
SRP (switch route processor) module    12
errors on
installing
IOA
PCMCIA slot
powering down
redundancy
removing    12
switch fabric slice    12
SRP IOA    1
cabling    12
installing
removing
starting router
static electricity, protecting against
storing, modules and components
support, technical     See technical support    
switch fabric modules
switch fabric slices    12
switch router processor modules
switches, power    12
switchover, SRP modules
synchronization, SRP modules
system maintenance
 

T

technical support    1
contacting JTAC
Telnet connection to router
temperature    
excessive    12
monitoring
requirements    12
text and syntax conventions
thermal protection mode    123
timing port
tools required    
cabling router
installing modules
removing components    12
unpacking router
troubleshooting    12
booting
cables    12
clocking
double-bit errors
Ethernet link
fans    12
LED activity for
modules    12
power failure    12
safety guidelines
 

U

uninstalling modules
unpacking router
upgrading NVS cards
 

V

ventilation
 

W

Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive.     See WEEE Directive    
WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment) Directive, recycling equipment
weight    
of E120 router
of E320 router
of rack    12

E120 and E320 Modules

The routers support SRP modules, SFM modules, line modules, and IOAs. You can use a line module for access or uplink. Access line modules receive traffic from low-speed circuits, and the system routes the traffic onto higher-speed uplink line modules and then to the core of the network. Line modules act as frame forwarding engines for the physical interfaces (the IOAs) via a passive midplane.

Most line modules, IOAs, SFMs, and SRP modules can be installed in either router. There are a few exceptions, however:

  • Similar-capacity modules must be used in the same router. For example, you cannot install an SRP-100 in a router that contains an SFM-320. You can only use a SRP–100 module with a SFM-100 module.
  • Higher-capacity SRP modules can be used in lower-capacity routers, but lower-capacity SRP modules cannot be used in high-capacity routers. For example, an SRP-320 can be used in an E120 router, but an SRP-120 cannot be used in an E320 router.
  • The SRP-100 module and the SFM-100 module are not supported in the E120 router.

See the E120 and E320 Module Guide for module and chassis compatibility.

The front panel of each module contains a collection of status LEDs (light-emitting diodes). For information about how to interpret the LEDs, see Troubleshooting. For complete module specifications, see the E120 and E320 Module Guide.

SRP Module

Switch route processor (SRP) modules perform system management, routing table calculations and maintenance, forwarding table computations, statistics processing, configuration storage, and other control plane functions. The SRP module identifies which line modules are physically present in the chassis and monitors and controls vital functions on the line modules.

Each SRP module (Figure 5) is a PowerPC-based system with its own memory, nonvolatile storage (NVS), and power converter. The SRP module works with the SFM modules and contains a switch fabric slice common to both modules. See Fabric Slices for more information.

Note: Because of different physical dimensions and switch fabric capabilities, SRP modules are not interchangeable between all routers. For example, the SRP–100 used in the E320 router cannot be used in other E Series routers, and vice versa. See the E120 and E320 Module Guide for SRP module compatibility.

Figure 5: Representative SRP Module

Representative SRP Module

Module Details

An SRP module must be present for the router to boot. The routers support up to two redundant SRP modules operating in an active/standby configuration. The redundant SRP module takes control when a failover occurs. See Redundancy Features and the E120 and E320 Module Guide for more SRP module information.

Caution: Do not remove the SRP module while the system is running, unless you have properly issued the halt command. See JunosE System Basics Configuration Guide, Chapter 6, Managing Modules for information about the halt commands.

Note: You cannot use SRP modules of different capacities in the same configuration. For example, you cannot install a SRP-100 module and a SRP-320 module in the same router.

For details about installing SRP modules, see Installing Modules.

Nonvolatile Storage

Depending on the model, each SRP module has either two Type II PCMCIA nonvolatile storage (NVS) cards or two ATA flash cards (0, 1). (See Figure 5.) One card is loaded with the system's software and configuration files while the other card holds core dumps. The NVS cards in the active SRP module are designated disk0 and disk1. The NVS cards in the redundant SRP module are designated standby-disk0 and standby-disk1. The PCMCIA card is factory installed.

Caution: Before you insert or remove flash cards from a running router, we strongly recommend that you halt the SRP module or shut down the router. Failure to do this can result in file corruption in one or both cards. See Replacing an NVS Card for more information.

SFM Module

The switch fabric modules (SFMs) work with the SRP module to create a shared memory fabric for the router. Each SFM module (Figure 6) has its own memory and power converter. Like the SRP module, the SFM module contains a fabric system processor board (slice). See Fabric Slices.

Note: You must use a SRP module that corresponds with the fabric type (SFM module) that is installed. For example, you can only use a SRP–100 module with a SFM-100 module. You cannot use a SRP–100 module with a SFM-320 module.

Figure 6: SFM Module

SFM Module

Fabric Slices

The router's switch fabric is distributed across two SRP modules and three SFM modules. Each module has a fabric slice on it. For the router to operate, at least four of the five slices must be operational.

When all five modules are installed, the fabric slice of the standby SRP acts as a redundant module. For example, the router can operate with:

  • Two SRP modules (the second of which is redundant) and three SFM modules
  • One SRP module (non-redundant) and three SFM modules
  • Two SRP modules and two SFM modules

Note: You cannot use SFM modules of different capacities in the same configuration. For example, you cannot install a SFM-100 module and a SFM-320 module in the same router.

SRP IOA

The SRP I/O adapter (IOA) is a single input/output adapter that interfaces with the SRP modules through the system's midplane. See Figure 2 and Figure 4 for its location.

Module Details

The SRP IOA provides standard management interfaces, including:

  • 10/100Base-T—The port enables access to the router for Ethernet management functions through Telnet, Secure Shell Server (SSH), command-line interface (CLI), or Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), for example.
  • RS-232—One port (console) provides a serial connection for monitoring the system's hardware configuration through a PC (running terminal emulation software) or ASCII terminal and enables direct CLI access. The second port (auxiliary) provides access to debug ports on specific processors (SRP module, line module). Juniper Networks customer support engineers use the auxiliary port. We recommend that users do not use the auxiliary port.
  • External timing inputs—The BNC connectors provide a method of ensuring that the clock timing used by the router remains synchronized with the network's system clock.

You can hot-swap SRP IOAs. Hot-swapping enables you to add or remove SRP IOAs without powering down the system. When you complete hot-swapping an SRP IOA, its MAC address in the subnet is automatically refreshed without rebooting the SRP or the chassis. Also, you can re-insert an SRP IOA that you had taken out previously to the same network without refreshing the MAC address of the SRP IOA.

Note: Hot-swapping an SRP IOA is unsupported during a unified in-service software upgrade (ISSU).

If you have configured RADIUS server on an SRP IOA that you want to replace, you can perform either of the following actions to prevent loss of accounting or logout information:

  • Disable accounting and, when there is no subscriber login or logout activity, hot-swap SRP IOA.
  • Increase the timeout value of the RADIUS server configured depending on the time used for IOA replacement. The maximum timeout value is 1000 seconds.

After you complete hot-swapping the SRP IOA, you can use the show version all command to display the state of the SRP IOA.

The SRP IOA hot-swapping is supported on the following routers:

  • E320 router with SRP-100 or SRP-320
  • E120 router

Note: We recommend that you complete the hot-swapping of the SRP IOA within 1800 seconds because the console or Telnet session might be terminated during the hot-swap operation.

For details about installing the SRP IOA, see Installing Modules.

Line Modules

Line modules (LMs) act as frame forwarding engines for the physical interfaces (the IOAs) and process data from different types of network connections. For information about available line modules, and which SRP modules support specific line modules, see the E120 and E320 Module Guide.

Figure 7 shows a representative line module. For details about installing line modules, see Installing Modules.

Figure 7: Representative Line Module

Representative Line Module

Packet Classification

The line module supports packet classification on ingress. A classification engine on the line module matches specific fields (such as source and destination IP address, source and destination port, and protocol), the ingress IP interface, layer 2 fields, or some combination of these against user-configured filters at wire speed.

I/O Adapters

Most input/output adapters (IOA) provide the physical interconnection to the network via small form-factor pluggable transceivers (SFPs). You insert each IOA into the passive midplane in the rear of the chassis, directly behind a line module. See Figure 2 for IOA location in the router and Figure 8 for a representative IOA model. See Installing and Removing SFPs and the E120 and E320 Module Guide for information on SFPs.

For a list of hot-swappable IOAs, see Table 4.

Figure 8: Representative IOA

Representative IOA

An IOA bracket can be installed to create upper and lower IOA bays (E320 router) or left and right IOA bays (E120 router), enabling you to use two IOAs in the same slot. This architecture enables you to combine different IOA types in the same slot and to support oversubscribed configurations.

Restrictions exist concerning which IOAs can be combined in the same slot and which bay (upper or lower, left or right) they may be installed in. See IOA Slot Combinations and the E120 and E320 Module Guide for information. For details about installing IOAs, see Installing Modules.

Modified: 2015-07-28