Adding vSRX Interfaces

 

The Hyper-V virtual switch is a software-based Layer 2 Ethernet network switch that connects VMs to either physical or virtual networks. A virtual switch can be configured from Hyper-V Manager or Windows PowerShell . The Hyper-V host uses the virtual switches to connect virtual machines to the internet through the host computer's network connection. You configure networking for the vSRX by adding, removing, and modifying its associated network adapters in the Hyper-V host as necessary.

Note

To perform this procedure, you must have appropriate permissions. Contact your Virtual Server administrator to request the proper permissions to add a virtual switch and network adapter..

For the vSRX VM, you pair a network adapter with a virtual switch for the vSRX to receive and transmit traffic. You map network adapters to the specific vSRX interfaces: Network adapter 1 is mapped to the fxp0 (out-of-band management) interface, network adapter 2 is mapped to the ge-0/0/0 (revenue) interface, network adapter 3 is mapped to ge-0/0/1, and so on (see Requirements for vSRX on Microsoft Hyper-V). Hyper-V supports a maximum of eight network adapters.

Note

When adding virtual switches, there are no limits imposed by Hyper-V. The practical limit depends on the available computing resources.

This section includes the following topics on adding vSRX interfaces in Hyper-V:

Adding Virtual Switches

To add virtual switches for the vSRX VM using the Virtual Switch Manager in the Hyper-V Manager:

  1. Open the Hyper-V Manager by selecting Start > Administrative Tools > Hyper-V Manager.
  2. Select Action > Virtual Switch Manager. The Virtual Switch Manager appears.
  3. Under the Virtual Switches section, select New virtual network switch. The Create Virtual Switch pane appears (see Figure 1).



    Figure 1: Create Virtual Switch Pane



     Create Virtual
Switch Pane
  4. Choose the type of virtual switch to create:
    • External—Gives virtual machines access to a physical network to communicate with servers and clients on an external network. It allows virtual machines on the same Hyper-V server to communicate with each other.

    • Internal—Allows communication between virtual machines on the same Hyper-V server, and between the virtual machines and the management host operating system.

    • Private—Allows communication only between virtual machines on the same Hyper-V server. A private network is isolated from all external network traffic on the Hyper-V server. This type of network is useful when you must create an isolated networking environment, like an isolated test domain.

    In most cases when adding a vSRX network adapter, select External as the type of virtual switch. Internal and private virtual switches are intended to keep network traffic within the Hyper-V server.

    Note

    For the fxp0 (out-of-band management) interface, connect it to External virtual switch, which could connect to an external network.

    For the ge-0/0/0 (revenue port) interface, if only communication between VMs in the same Hyper-V server is needed, Internal or Private virtual switch should be sufficient. However, if communication between the VM and an external network is needed, connect it to External virtual switch.

  5. Select Create Virtual Switch. The Virtual Switch Properties pane appears (see Figure 2).



    Figure 2: Virtual Switch Properties Pane



     Virtual Switch
Properties Pane
  6. Specify a name for the virtual switch.
  7. Choose the physical network interface card b(NIC) that you want to use (only a requirement when you select External).
  8. Isolate network traffic from the management Hyper-V host operating system or other virtual machines that share the same virtual switch by selecting Enable virtual LAN identification. You can change the VLAN ID to any number or leave the default. See Configuring the vSRX to Use a VLAN for details.
  9. Click OK, then click Yes to apply networking changes and to close the Virtual Switch Manager window.
  10. If necessary, repeat Steps 3 through 9 to add additional network adapters for use by the vSRX VM.
  11. Right-click the vSRX VM and select Settings from the context menu. From the Settings dialog box, under the Hardware section, click Network Adapter. The Network Adapter pane appears (see Figure 3).
  12. From the Virtual switch drop-down list, select the virtual switch that you want to assign to this network adapter. See Requirements for vSRX on Microsoft Hyper-V for a summary of interface names and mappings for a vSRX VM.



    Figure 3: Adding Virtual Switch to Network Adapter Example



     Adding
Virtual Switch to Network Adapter Example
  13. If a network adapter is to be used as an interface for Layer 2 mode support on the vSRX, then from the Network Adapter pane select Advanced Features. Select the Enable MAC address spoofing check box to enable the MAC address spoofing function for the network adapter (see Figure 4).



    MAC address spoofing allows each network adapter to change its source MAC address for outgoing packets to one that is not assigned to them. Enabling MAC address spoofing ensures those packets are not dropped by the network adapter if the source MAC address fails to match the outgoing interface MAC address.

    Figure 4: Network Adapter Enable MAC Address Spoofing Example



     Network Adapter Enable MAC Address Spoofing Example
  14. Click Apply and OK to save the changes in the Settings dialog box.
  15. Launch and power on the vSRX instance in the Hyper-V Manager by selecting the vSRX VM from the list of virtual machines, and then right-click and select Start from the context menu (or select Action > Start).

Configuring the vSRX to Use a VLAN

Hyper-V supports the configuration of VLANs on a network adapter in the host computer. For each network adapter that you configure for the vSRX VM, if required, you can add a VLAN identifier to specify the VLAN that the vSRX VM will use for all network communications through the network adapter.

By default, Hyper-V enables trunk mode for a VLAN. Trunk mode allows multiple VLAN IDs to share a connection between the physical network adapter and the physical network.

To give the vSRX VM external access on the virtual network in multiple VLANs, you will need to configure the port on the physical network to be in trunk mode. You will also need to know the specific VLANs that are used and all of the VLAN IDs used by the virtual machines that the virtual network supports.

To utilize a Hyper-V VLAN, ensure that you are using a physical network adapter that supports 802.1q VLAN tagging. By default, the virtual network adapter in Hyper-V is in untagged mode and you might need to enable the feature on a virtual network adapter.

Note

By using Windows PowerShell, you can determine the mode of the vNIC (Get-VmNetworkAdapterVlan command) and change the mode of the vNIC (Set-VmNetworkAdapterVlan command). See Get-VMNetworkAdapterVlan and Set-VMNetworkAdapterVlan for details on both Windows PowerShell virtual network adapter commands.

To add a VLAN for a vSRX VM virtual network adapter:

  1. Open the Hyper-V Manager by selecting Start > Administrative Tools > Hyper-V Manager.
  2. Right-click the vSRX VM and select Settings from the context menu.
  3. From the Settings dialog box, under the Hardware section, select the network adapter connected to the external virtual network. The Network Adapter pane appears.
  4. Select Enable virtual LAN identification, and then enter the VLAN ID you intend to use (see Figure 5). You can change the VLAN ID to any number or leave the default. This is the VLAN identification number that the vSRX will use for all network communication through this network adapter.



    Figure 5: Enable VLAN Identification Example



    Enable VLAN Identification
Example
  5. Click OK, and then click Yes to apply networking changes.
  6. If necessary, repeat Steps 3 through 5 to add VLAN identification to additional network adapters in use by the vSRX VM.