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 A  C  D  E  F  G  I  J  L  M  N  P  Q  R  S  T  W

 

A

address pools    
assigned IP subscribers    
configuring
address pools.     See IP address pools    
application manager    
role, in PCMM environment
assigned IP subscribers    
PCMM network    12
address pools
IP address pools
setting timeouts
voice over IP
 

C

cable modem termination system.     See CMTS devices    
classify-traffic condition    
match direction, setting    
SRC CLI
client type 1, PCMM
client type 2, PCMM
CMTS devices    
adding objects to directory    
SRC CLI
adding virtual router objects to directory    
SRC CLI
configuration statements    12
role
CMTS locator    
monitoring    
C-Web interface
SRC CLI
COA script services, configuring
configuration wizard    
fair usage    
configuration overview
running
running    12
configuration wizards    
fair usage    
overview
overview    12
conventions    
notice icons
text
custom RADIUS authentication plug-ins
customer support    1
contacting JTAC
 

D

Data over Cable Service Interface Specifications.     See DOCSIS protocol    
Diameter    
peers    
configuring    12
Diameter server    
clients, viewing    
SRC CLI
message flows, viewing    
SRC CLI
message handler, viewing    
SRC CLI
monitoring    
SRC CLI
peers, viewing    
SRC CLI
server process, viewing    
SRC CLI
server requests, viewing    
SRC CLI
statistics, viewing    
SRC CLI
status, viewing    
SRC CLI
DOCSIS protocol
documentation    
comments on
domains    
IP service edge
IP subscriber edge
radio frequency
Dynamic policy changes    
Dynamic policy changes, managing
dynamic RADIUS authorization requests    
RADIUS packets, defining    12
 

E

end-to-end services
event notification, PCMM network    
configuration statements
description
properties, configuring    
SRC CLI
 

F

filter actions    
configuring    
SRC CLI
flexible RADIUS authentication plug-ins    
configuring
forwarding class actions    
configuring    
SRC CLI
 

G

Gx router driver    
application information, configuring    
SRC CLI
dynamic PCC rules, configuring    
SRC CLI
flow information, configuring    
SRC CLI
overview
policies, configuration statements    
SRC CLI
policies, configuring    
SRC CLI
policy list, configuring    
SRC CLI
QoS information, configuring    
SRC CLI
redirect information, configuring    
SRC CLI
static PCC rules, configuring    
SRC CLI
steering information, configuring    
SRC CLI
 

I

IP address pools    
assigned IP subscribers
assigned IP subscribers, configuring    
SRC CLI
local address pools, configuring    
SRC CLI
static pools, configuring    
SRC CLI
 

J

JPS (Juniper Policy Server)    
application manager-to-policy server interface, configuring
application manager-to-policy server interface, monitoring    
C-Web interface    12
SRC CLI
architecture
CMTS devices, monitoring    
C-Web interface
CMTS locator, monitoring    
C-Web interface
SRC CLI
JPS state, monitoring
logging, configuring
logging, modifying
message flows, monitoring    
C-Web interface
SRC CLI
message handler, monitoring    
C-Web interface
SRC CLI
monitoring    
C-Web interface
SRC CLI    12
operational status
overview
policy server-to-CMTS interface, configuring
policy server-to-CMTS interface, monitoring    
C-Web interface    12
SRC CLI
policy server-to-RKS interface, configuring
policy server-to-RKS interface, monitoring    
C-Web interface
SRC CLI
server process, monitoring    
C-Web interface
SRC CLI
starting    
SRC CLI
stopping    
SRC CLI
subscriber address mappings, configuring
subscriber configuration, modifying
JSRC    
JSRC and PTSP configuration example    
SRC CLI
Juniper Policy Server.     See JPS    
 

L

login process    
assigned IP subscribers, PCMM
 

M

manuals    
comments on
MX Series router as a PTSP network device    
MX Series router as a PTSP network device, adding    
SRC CLI
 

N

NIC (network information collector)    
IP address pools, configuring    
SRC CLI
notice icons
 

P

packet mirroring, configuring
PCMM (PacketCable Multimedia)    
application manager, role
client type 1
client type 2
CMTS device, role
configuring SAE    
SRC CLI
creating sessions
description
end-to-end QoS architecture
end-to-end services
integrating SRC software
IP service edge domain
IP subscriber edge domain
logging in subscribers    
assigned IP method
overview
overview
policy server, role
provisioning end-to-end services
record-keeping server
RF domain
SAE
SAE communities
session store
single-phase resource reservation model
SRC software in    
description
traffic profiles
video-on-demand example
videoconferencing example
PCMM device driver    
configuration statements
configuring    
SRC CLI
PCMM record-keeping server plug-in    
configuration statements
configuring    
SRC CLI
description
plug-ins    
PCMM record-keeping server plug-in
policy actions    
filter    
configuring, SRC CLI
forwarding class    
configuring, SRC CLI
forwarding instance    
configuring, SRC CLI
policy groups    
configuring    
SRC CLI
policy servers    
adding application manager groups    
SRC CLI
adding objects to directory    
SRC CLI
role, in PCMM architecture
specifying application managers    
SRC CLI
specifying SAE communities    
SRC CLI
PTSP    
configuring    
SRC CLI
PTSP and JSRC configuration example    
SRC CLI
PTSP configuration example    
SRC CLI
PTSP policies, configuration statements    
SRC CLI
ssr-writer    
SRC CLI
PTSP actions    
PTSP actions, configuring    
SRC CLI    12
PTSP classify-traffic condition    
destination grouped network, configuring    
SRC CLI
destination network, configuring    
SRC CLI
protocol conditions with parameters, setting    
SRC CLI
protocol conditions with ports, setting    
SRC CLI
protocol conditions, setting    
SRC CLI
TCP conditions, setting    
SRC CLI
traffic match conditions, setting    
SRC CLI
PTSP classify-traffic conditions    
creating    
SRC CLI
PTSP classify-traffic conditions, configuring    
SRC CLI
PTSP device driver    
overview
PTSP device driver, configuring    
SRC CLI
PTSP on MX Series router    
PTSP on MX Series router, configuring    
SRC CLI
PTSP policer instance    
PTSP policer instance, configuring    
SRC CLI
PTSP policies    
PTSP policies, configuring    
SRC CLI
PTSP policy list    
PTSP policy list, configuring    
SRC CLI
PTSP policy rules    
network, specifying
PTSP policy rules, configuring    
SRC CLI
PTSP session store    
PTSP device driver session store, configuring    
SRC CLI
PTSP traffic match    
conditions, setting    
SRC CLI
 

Q

QoS (quality of service)    
PCMM environments    
end-to-end QoS architecture
extending to service edge domain
extending to subscriber edge domain
searching for policies in directory
QoS profile-tracking plug-in    
description
QoS profiles, routers running JunosE Software    
how tracking works
managing dynamically
updating directory, using    
qosProfilePublish
quality of service.     See QoS    
 

R

RADIUS    
vendor-specific attributes for wireless ISP roaming
record-keeping server.     See RKS    
RKS (record-keeping server)    
peers, configuration statements
peers, configuring in plug-ins    
SRC CLI
plug-in
plug-in, configuration statements
plug-in, configuring    
SRC CLI
role in PCMM environment
roaming wireless environment
 

S

SAE (service activation engine)    
configuring as an application manager    
SRC CLI
PCMM environment
redundancy.     See SAE communities    
SAE (service activation engine), configuring    
community manager    
SRC CLI
event notification API properties    
SRC CLI
PCMM device driver    
SRC CLI    12
SAE communities    
configuration overview    
SRC CLI
configuration statements
configuring manager    
SRC CLI
defining members    
SRC CLI
description
service flows
services    
voice over IP (VoIP)
session store    
in PCMM environment
single phase resource reservation model, PCMM
subscriber    
wireless environment
support, technical     See technical support    
 

T

technical support    
contacting JTAC
text conventions defined
traffic policies, PCMM
 

W

wireless environment

Related Documentation

Using the SAE in a PCMM Environment

The SAE uses the Common Open Policy Service (COPS) protocol as specified in the PacketCable Multimedia Specification PKT-SP-MM-I03-051221 to manage PCMM-compliant CMTS devices in a cable network environment. The SAE connects to the CMTS device by using a COPS over Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) connection. In cable environments, the SAE manages the connection to the CMTS device.

The CMTS device does not provide address requests or notify the SAE of new subscribers, subscriber IP addresses, or any other attributes. IP address detection and all other subscriber attributes are collected outside of the COPS connection to the CMTS device. The SAE uses COPS only to push policies to the CMTS device and to learn about the CMTS status and usage data.

Because the CMTS device does not have the concept of interfaces, the SRC software uses pseudointerfaces to model CMTS subscriber connections similar to subscriber connections for routers running Junos OS.

This section describes how the SAE is used in cable networks. It includes the following topics:

Logging In Subscribers and Creating Sessions

You can use two mechanisms to obtain subscriber address requests and other information and to set up a pseudointerface on the CMTS device. (You must choose one mechanism; you cannot mix them.):

  1. Assigned IP subscriber. The SAE learns about a subscriber through subscriber-initiated activities, such as activating a service through the portal or through the Advanced Services Gateway (ASG).

    With this method, you use the assigned IP subscriber login type along with the network interface collector (NIC) to map IP addresses to the SAE.

  2. Event notification from an IP address manager. The SAE learns about subscribers through notifications from an external IP address manager, such as a DHCP server or a RADIUS server.

    With this method, you use the event notification application programming interface (API). The API provides an interface to the IP address manager, and lets the IP address manager notify the SAE of events such as IP address assignments.

Assigned IP Subscribers

With the assigned IP subscriber method of logging in subscribers and creating sessions, the SRC software uses IP address pools along with NIC resolvers to provide mapping of IP addresses to SAEs. You configure the static address pools or dynamically discovered address pools in the virtual router configuration for a CMTS device. These pools are published in the NIC. The NIC maps subscriber IP addresses in requests received through the portal or Advanced Services Gateway to the SAE that currently manages that CMTS device.

Login Interactions with Assigned IP Subscribers

This section describes login interactions for assigned IP subscribers. In the example shown in Figure 12, the subscriber activates a service through a portal. You could also have the subscriber activate a service through the Advanced Services Gateway.

Figure 12: Login Interactions with Assigned IP Subscribers

Login Interactions with Assigned IP Subscribers

The sequence of events for logging in and creating sessions for assigned IP subscribers is:

  1. The subscriber logs in to the portal.
  2. The portal sends the subscriber’s IP address to the NIC.
  3. Based on the IP address, the NIC looks up the subscriber’s SAE, CMTS device, and interface name, and returns this information to the portal.
  4. The portal sends a getSubscriber message to the SAE. The message includes the subscriber’s IP address, CMTS device, and interface name.
  5. The SAE creates an assigned IP subscriber and performs a subscriber login. Specifically, it:
    1. Runs the interface classification script and creates a pseudointerface for the PCMM device driver.
      • If it finds a default policy, it pushes the policy to the CMTS device.
      • If it does not find a default policy, it continues with the next steps.
    2. Runs the subscriber classification script with the IP address of the subscriber. (Use the ASSIGNEDIP login type in subscriber classification scripts.)
    3. Loads the subscriber profile.
    4. Runs the subscriber authorization plug-ins.
    5. Runs the subscriber tracking plug-ins.
    6. Creates a subscriber session and stores the session data in the session store file.
  6. The SAE pushes service policies for the subscriber session to the CMTS device.

Because the SAE is not notified when the subscriber logs out, the assigned IP idle timer begins when no service is active. The SAE removes the interface subscriber session when the timeout period ends.

Event Notification from an IP Address Manager

With the event notification method of logging in subscribers and creating subscriber sessions, the subscriber logs in to the CMTS device and obtains an IP address through an address server, usually a DHCP server. The SAE receives notifications about the subscriber, such as the subscriber’s IP address, from an event notification application that is installed on the DHCP server.

To use this method of logging in subscribers, you can use the event notification API to create the application that notifies the SAE when events occur between the DHCP server and the CMTS device. You can also use Monitoring Agent, an application that was created with the event notification API, and that monitors DHCP or RADIUS messages for DHCP or RADIUS servers. See SRC PE Sample Applications Guide.

Login with Event Notification

This section describes login interactions using event notifications.

Figure 13: Login Interactions with Event Notification Application

Login Interactions with Event Notification
Application

The sequence of events for logging in subscribers and creating sessions is:

  1. The DHCP client in the subscriber’s computer sends a DHCP discover request to the DHCP server.
  2. The DHCP server sends a DHCP offer to the subscriber’s DHCP client.
  3. The DHCP client sends a DHCP request to the DHCP server.
  4. The DHCP server acknowledges the request by sending a DHCP Ack message to the DHCP client.
  5. The event notification application that is running on the DHCP server intercepts the DHCP Ack message.
  6. The event notification application sends an ipUp message to the SAE that notifies the SAE that an IP address is up.
  7. The SAE performs a subscriber login. Specifically, it:
    1. Runs the interface classification script and creates a pseudointerface for the PCMM device driver.
      • If it finds a default policy, it pushes the policy to the CMTS device.
      • If it does not find a default policy, it continues with the next steps.
    2. Runs the subscriber classification script.
    3. Loads the subscriber profile.
    4. Runs the subscriber authorization plug-ins.
    5. Runs the subscriber tracking plug-ins.
    6. Creates a subscriber session and stores the session in the session store file.
  8. The SAE provisions policies for the subscriber session on the CMTS device.

The ipUp event should be sent with a timeout set to the DHCP lease time. The DHCP server sends an ipUp event for each Ack sent to the client. The SAE restarts the timeout each time it receives an ipUp event.

If the client explicitly releases the DHCP address (that is, it sends a DHCP release event), the DHCP server sends an ipDown event. If the client does not renew the address, the lease expires on the DHCP server and the timeout expires on the SAE.

SAE Communities

For SAE redundancy in a cable network, you can have a community of two or more SAEs. SAEs in a community are given the role of either active SAE or passive SAE. The active SAE manages the connection to the CMTS device and keeps session data up to date within the community. Figure 14 shows a typical SAE community.

Figure 14: SAE Community

SAE Community

When an SAE opens a connection to the CMTS device, it negotiates with other SAEs to determine which SAE controls the CMTS device. The SAE community manager and members of the community select the active SAE.

A passive SAE needs to take over as active SAE in any of the following cases:

  • The active SAE shuts down or the connection between the CMTS device and the active SAE goes down. In this case, the active SAE notifies the passive SAEs, and one of the passive SAEs takes over as active SAE.
  • A passive SAE does not receive a keepalive message from the active SAE within the keepalive interval. In this case, the passive SAE attempts to become the active SAE.

Storing Session Data

To aid in recovering from an SAE failover, the SAE stores subscriber and service session data. When the SAE manages a CMTS device, session data is stored locally in the SAE host’s file system. The SRC component that controls the storage of session data on the SAE is called the session store. The session store queues data and then writes the data to session store files on the SAE host’s disk. Once the data is written to disk, it can survive a server reboot.

For more information, see Fault Recovery.

PCMM Record-Keeping Server Plug-In

To allow the SAE’s embedded policy server to communicate with a record-keeping server (RKS) in a PCMM environment, you need to use the PCMM record-keeping server plug-in. This plug-in is similar to the RADIUS accounting plug-ins, but it works with any RKS that is compliant with the PCMM specification. The RKS plug-in supports additional attributes: Application-Manager-ID, Request-Type, and Update-Reason. The plug-in sends all requests to the RKS as Acct-Status-Type=Interim-Update.

 

Related Documentation

Modified: 2015-06-19