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Replacing the Entire Candidate Configuration

 

A client application can completely replace the current candidate configuration, either with new data or by rolling back to a previous configuration.

Note

To comply with the NETCONF specification, the NETCONF server accepts the <delete-config> tag element, which deletes the entire candidate configuration. However, a commit operation fails if the candidate configuration does not exist or is completely empty, so the application must use the <edit-config> or <copy-config> tag element to add data to the candidate configuration before committing it. See <delete-config>.

For information about completely replacing the candidate configuration, see the following sections:

Replacing the Candidate Configuration with Newly Defined Data

Replacing the Candidate Configuration with Newly Defined Data

To replace the entire candidate configuration with new configuration data, a client application can use either of two methods, as described in the following sections.

With either method, the NETCONF server confirms that it replaced the candidate configuration by returning the <ok/> tag in the <rpc-reply> tag element:

If the NETCONF server cannot replace the candidate configuration data, the <rpc-reply> tag element instead encloses an<rpc-error> tag element explaining the reason for the failure.

Replacing the Configuration with the Contents of a File

Replacing the Configuration with the Contents of a File

One method for replacing the entire candidate configuration is to include the <copy-config> tag element in the <rpc> tag element. The <source> tag element encloses the <url> tag element to specify the filename that contains the new configuration data. The <target> tag element encloses the <candidate/> tag to indicate that the new configuration data replaces the candidate configuration:

Setting Replace Mode as the Default Mode

Setting Replace Mode as the Default Mode

The other method for replacing the entire candidate configuration is to set replace mode as the default incorporation mode. The candidate configuration includes the <default-operation>tag element with the value replace in the <edit-config> tag element, as described in Setting the Default Mode for Incorporating New Configuration Data. To specify the new configuration data, the application includes either a <config> tag element that contains the data or a <url> tag element that names the file containing the data, as discussed in Defining the New Configuration Data.

Replacing the Candidate Configuration with the Running Configuration

Replacing the Candidate Configuration with the Running Configuration

To discard changes made to the candidate configuration and make its contents match the contents of the current running (active) configuration, a client application includes the <discard-changes/> tag in an<rpc> tag element:

This operation is equivalent to the CLI configuration mode rollback command.

The NETCONF server indicates that it discarded the changes by enclosing the <ok/> tag in the <rpc-reply> tag element: