Help us improve your experience.

Let us know what you think.

Do you have time for a two-minute survey?

 

Example: VPLS Configuration (BGP Signaling)

 
Figure 1: VPLS Topology Diagram
VPLS Topology Diagram

In Figure 1, a simple VPLS topology is enabled between routers PE1 and PE2. CE routers CE1 and CE2 use Ethernet-based interfaces to connect VLAN 600 to their local PE router. The PE routers PE1 and PE2 are connected to one another by LSPs enabled across a service provider backbone running MPLS, BGP, RSVP, and OSPF.

In a VPLS routing instance named green, PE1 has a local interface fe-0/1/0 and a virtual port of vt-0/3/0.32770 (the virtual port is created dynamically on the Tunnel Services PIC when VPLS is configured). PE2 has a local interface fe-0/1/0 and a virtual port of vt-0/3/0.32771 in the same green instance. As a result, routers CE1 and CE2 send Ethernet traffic to one another as if they were physically connected to each other on a LAN.

On Router CE1, the only item you need to configure is the Fast Ethernet interface that connects to PE1. Be sure to write down the VLAN identifier and IP address, so you can match them later on CE2.

Router CE1

If Router PE1 is an MX Series device, you need to configure a tunnel service interface.

To create tunnel interfaces on an MX Series router, include the tunnel-services statement at the [edit chassis fpc slot-number pic number] hierarchy level. To configure the bandwidth for a tunnel interface, include the bandwidth statement at the [edit chassis fpc slot-number pic number tunnel services] hierarchy level.

The following example shows a tunnel interface with 1 Gbps of bandwidth configured on PFE 3 of the DPC installed in slot 0 of an MX Series router:

On Router PE1, prepare the router for VPLS by configuring BGP, MPLS, OSPF, and RSVP. (These protocols are the basis for most Layer 2 VPN-related applications, including VPLS.) Include the signaling statement at the [edit protocols bgp group group-name family l2vpn] hierarchy level, because VPLS uses the same infrastructure for internal BGP as Layer 2 VPNs.

Note

In Junos OS Release 7.3 and later, the signaling statement replaces the unicast statement at the [edit protocols bgp group group-name family l2vpn] hierarchy level. You must use the signaling statement if you wish to configure VPLS domains and Layer 2 VPNs simultaneously.

Next, configure VLAN tagging on the Fast Ethernet interface connected to Router CE1. Include VLAN VPLS encapsulation at both the physical and logical interface levels. Be sure to use the same VLAN ID for all Ethernet interfaces that are part of a single VPLS instance. Finally, add the Fast Ethernet interface into a VPLS routing instance and specify the site range, site ID number, and site name.

Router PE1

On Router P0, configure BGP, MPLS, OSPF, and RSVP to interconnect PE1 and PE2.

Router P0

If Router PE2 is an MX Series device, you need to configure a tunnel service interfaces.

To create tunnel interfaces on an MX Series router, include the tunnel-services statement at the [edit chassis fpc slot-number pic number] hierarchy level. To configure the bandwidth for a tunnel interface, include the bandwidth statement at the [edit chassis fpc slot-number pic number] hierarchy level.

The following example shows a tunnel interface with 1 Gbps of bandwidth configured on PFE 3 of the DPC installed in slot 0 of an MX Series router:

On Router PE2, configure BGP, MPLS, OSPF, and RSVP to complement the configuration on PE1. Next, configure VLAN tagging on the Fast Ethernet interface connected to Router CE2. Include VLAN VPLS encapsulation at both the physical and logical interface levels. Be sure to use the same VLAN ID for all Ethernet interfaces that are part of a single VPLS instance. Finally, add the Fast Ethernet interface into a VPLS routing instance and specify the site range, site ID number, and site name.

Router PE2

On Router CE2, complete your VPLS network by configuring the Fast Ethernet interface that connects to PE2. Use the same VLAN identifier and IP address prefix used on Router CE1.

Router CE2

Verifying Your Work

To verify proper operation of VPLS, use the following commands:

  • clear vpls mac-address instance instance-name

  • show interfaces terse

  • show route forwarding-table family mpls

  • show route forwarding-table family vpls (destination | extensive | matching | table)

  • show route instance (detail)

  • show system statistics vpls

  • show vpls connections

  • show vpls statistics

The following section shows the output of these commands on Router PE1 as a result of the configuration example:

user@PE1> show interfaces terse
user@PE1> show system statistics vpls

To display VPLS source and destination MAC address accounting information, use the destination, extensive, matching, or table option with the show route forwarding-table family vpls command. When you analyze the display output, keep in mind the following:

  • VPLS MAC address accounting is handled on a per-MAC address basis for each VPLS instance. All information is retrieved from MAC address entries in the MAC address table. VPLS MAC address accounting is performed only on local CE routers.

  • The VPLS counters for source and destination MAC addresses increment continuously until the oldest MAC address entries are removed from the memory buffer, either when the entries time out or if the VPLS instance is restarted.

    user@PE1> show route forwarding-table family vpls extensive
    user@PE1> show route forwarding-table family vpls
    user@PE1> show route forwarding-table family mpls
    user@PE1> show route instance green detail
    user@PE1> show vpls connections
    user@PE1> show system statistics vpls
    user@PE1> show route instance green detail
    user@PE1> show vpls statistics

To clear all MAC address entries for a VPLS instance from the VPLS table, issue the clear vpls mac-address instance instance-name command. Add the logical-system logical-system-name option to clear entries in a VPLS instance within a logical system. Use the mac-address option to remove individual MAC addresses.

Related Documentation