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Understanding the Small Office Videoconferencing Reference Architecture

 

This topic provides the details of the SOHO reference architecture for deploying high-definition videoconferencing in a small office.

The SOHO reference architecture connects PCs and teleconferencing equipment to the high-speed broadband network using the residential network and Internet. The SRX Series Services Gateway connects to the broadband network, using either an integrated DSL modem or an external gateway.

Note

The reference architecture is dependent on the speed and latency of the telecommuter's broadband provider network. Unless an enterprise is willing to provide a dedicated circuit or virtual private network, and dedicated connection to the teleworker, the video quality is handled as best effort and is difficult to guarantee.

Figure 1 shows the SOHO broadband reference architecture for a DSL connection.

Figure 1: SOHO Broadband Reference Architecture Using DSL
SOHO Broadband Reference Architecture
Using DSL

Figure 2 shows the SOHO broadband reference architecture for a cable network.

Figure 2: SOHO Broadband Reference Architecture Using Cable Modem
SOHO Broadband Reference Architecture
Using Cable Modem

In addition to PCs and voice over IP (VOIP) phones, the infrastructure at the SOHO network consists of the following devices:

  • Polycom videoconferencing equipment— Polycom personal video solutions seamlessly extend clear, high-definition video to small offices, mobile users, and branch sites. Polycom VVX 1500 business media phones unify voice, video, and applications capabilities into simple-to-use unified communication (UC) devices, providing a dynamic, real-time meeting experience in a compact format with features that are easy to use in a small office environment and operate over an IP network. The Polycom VVX 1500 connects to the SRX Series Services Gateways.

  • Juniper Networks SRX Series Services Gateways—Provide the security WAN routing and gateway functionality and offer the essential capabilities to connect, secure, and manage enterprise and service provider networks. The SRX Series Services Gateways offer service expandability as well as flexible processing and I/O scalability. Major features include:

    • Tightly integrated networking and security capabilities that include firewall, intrusion prevention system (IPS), distributed denial of service (DDoS) and denial of service (DoS), routing, quality of service (QoS), Network Address Translation (NAT), and other capabilities.

    • Dynamic services architecture that allows the SRX Series devices to quickly enable new services and capabilities.

    The SRX Series Services Gateway connects to the broadband network, using either an integrated DSL modem or an external gateway.

  • Cable modem—The connection to the customer premise equipment (CPE) is provided through a cable modem using an Ethernet interface. The modem connects to a Cable Modem Termination Device (CMTS) on the residential network. In Figure 2, an SRX100 Services Gateway serves as the secure router between the customer premises LAN segment and the Internet.

  • DSL modem—The connection to the customer premises equipment is provided through a DSL modem, either using an Ethernet interface, in the case of a provider-supplied DSL modem, or through the SRX WAN interface option (ADSL2 Annex-A Mini-PIM). In Figure 1, an SRX100 customer premises device with a WAN interface option (ADSL2 Annex-A Mini-PIM port) serves as the residential gateway device. This allows the SRX Series device to serve as both a DSL modem and a security router in the SOHO site and helps to boost security while avoiding the associated dual NAT complexities. The ISP’s residential network terminates the DSL modem on to a Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer (DSLAM).

    Note

    When you configure an Ethernet interface, you must configure Point-to-Point Protocol over ATM (PPPoA) with login credentials to negotiate and set up IP connectivity to the public Internet.

The videoconferencing infrastructure in the data center consists of the following products:

  • Juniper Networks SRX Series Services Gateways provide the security WAN routing and gateway functionality in the data center and offer the essential capabilities to connect, secure, and manage enterprise and service provider networks.

  • Polycom Distributed Media Application (DMA) server is a network-based application for managing and distributing multipoint calls across conference platforms. It also performs the role of a Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) server and H.323 gatekeeper. The DMA that serves as the call control engine is the gatekeeper, which is contacted by the endpoints during call setup. The DMA is pre-provisioned with information about endpoints, their capabilities, and the site topology.

  • Polycom Real-Time Media Conferencing Platform (RMX) is a real-time media conference platform that provides the multipoint conferencing facility to the endpoints by mixing the video and audio streams from multiple calls. When a conference call setup request is received, the DMA selects an RMX device based on the current load and communicates the call setup information to the appropriate RMX media server.

  • Converged Management Application (CMA) helps by centrally managing and deploying visual communication across the enterprise organization—from large conference rooms to individual desktops.

  • Juniper Networks Session and Resource Control (SRC) software is a dynamic policy and network resource allocation system that enables network resources to be dynamically reconfigured based on the requirements. The SRC connects the service layer with the network layer of service provider networks by providing a feedback loop between applications, users, and the network. Its open interfaces allow it to integrate with any network and any service offering, regardless of where the demand is generated. The SRC allows service providers to generate additional revenue on their existing network infrastructure by adding dynamically activated services.