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Maintaining the MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 MICs and Transceivers

 

Maintaining the MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 MICs

Purpose

For optimum router performance, verify the condition of the MICs.

Action

On a regular basis:

  • Check the LEDs on MIC faceplates. The meaning of the LED states differs for various MICs. For more information, see the MX Series Interface Module Reference. If the router detects a MIC failure, the router generates an alarm message to be sent to the Routing Engine.

  • Issue the CLI show chassis fpc pic-status command. The MIC slots in the MX5, MX10, MX40, and modular MX80 router are numbered 1/MIC 0 and 1/MIC 1. The fixed MIC is numbered 0/MIC 0.

    user@host> show chassis fpc pic-status

Replacing an MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 MIC

Removing an MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 MIC

MICs are hot-insertable and hot-removable. When you remove a MIC, the router continues to function, although the MIC interfaces being removed no longer function.

In the MX5, MX10, MX40, and modular configuration of the MX80 router, the MICs can be installed in two slots in the front of the router. A MIC weighs less than 2 lb (0.9 kg).

To remove a MIC (see Figure 1 and Figure 2):

  1. Place an electrostatic bag or antistatic mat on a flat, stable surface to receive the MIC. If the MIC connects to fiber-optic cable, have ready a rubber safety cap for each transceiver and cable.
  2. Wrap and fasten one end of the ESD grounding strap around your bare wrist, and connect the other end of the strap to an ESD point.
  3. Use one of the following methods to take the MIC offline:
    • Press its online/offline button. Use a narrow-ended tool that fits inside the opening that leads to the button. Press and hold the button until the MIC OK/FAIL LED goes off (about 5 seconds).

    • Issue the following CLI command:

      user@host> request chassis mic fpc-slot slot-number mic-slot slot-number offline
  4. Label the cables connected to the MIC so that you can later reconnect each cable to the correct MIC.
  5. Disconnect the cables from the MIC. If the MIC uses fiber-optic cable, immediately cover each transceiver and the end of each cable with a rubber safety cap.Warning

    Do not look directly into a fiber-optic transceiver or into the ends of fiber-optic cables. Fiber-optic transceivers and fiber-optic cables connected to a transceiver emit laser light that can damage your eyes.

    Caution

    Do not leave a fiber-optic transceiver uncovered except when you are inserting or removing cable. The safety cap keeps the port clean and prevents accidental exposure to laser light.

  6. Arrange the cable to prevent it from dislodging or developing stress points. Secure the cable so that it is not supporting its own weight as it hangs to the floor. Place excess cable out of the way in a neatly coiled loop. Caution

    Avoid bending a fiber-optic cable beyond its minimum bend radius. An arc smaller than a few inches in diameter can damage the cable and cause problems that are difficult to diagnose.

  7. Pull the ejector lever above the MIC you are removing away from the router. Pulling the ejector lever disconnects the MIC from the chassis.Note

    To remove a dual-wide MIC that takes up both MIC slots, you must pull both ejector levers.

  8. Grasp the handles on the MIC faceplate, and slide the MIC out of the chassis. Place it in the electrostatic bag or on the antistatic mat.
  9. If you are not reinstalling a MIC into the emptied MIC slot within a short time, install a blank MIC panel over the slot to maintain proper airflow in the chassis card cage.
Figure 1: Removing a MIC
Removing a MIC
Figure 2: Removing a Dual-Wide MIC
Removing a Dual-Wide
MIC

Installing an MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 MIC

To install a MIC (see Figure 4):

Note

The MIC can be installed in either the front slots or the rear slot.

  1. Wrap and fasten one end of the ESD grounding strap around your bare wrist, and connect the other end of the strap to an ESD point.
  2. If the MIC uses fiber-optic cable, verify that a rubber safety cap is over each transceiver on the faceplate. Install a cap if necessary.
  3. If you have used a dual-wide MIC and are now replacing it with two “single” MICs, install the septum (see Figure 3):
    1. Align the bottom of the septum with the grooves in the center of the two MIC slots.
    2. Slide the septum toward the rear of the chassis until it is seated firmly in place.
    Figure 3: Installing the Septum
    Installing the Septum
  4. Pull the ejector lever above the MIC slot away from the router.
  5. Align the rear of the MIC with the guides located at the corners of the MIC slot.
  6. Slide the MIC into the MIC slot until it is firmly seated in the chassis.Caution

    Slide the MIC straight into the slot to avoid damaging the components on the MIC.

  7. Verify that the ejector lever is engaged by pushing it toward the router.
  8. If the MIC uses fiber-optic cable, remove the rubber safety cap from each transceiver and the end of each cable.Warning

    Do not look directly into a fiber-optic transceiver or into the ends of fiber-optic cables. Fiber-optic transceivers and fiber-optic cables connected to a transceiver emit laser light that can damage your eyes.

    Caution

    Do not leave a fiber-optic transceiver uncovered except when you are inserting or removing cable. The safety cap keeps the port clean and prevents accidental exposure to laser light.

  9. Insert the appropriate cables into the cable connectors on the MIC.
  10. Arrange each cable to prevent the cable from dislodging or developing stress points. Secure the cable so that it is not supporting its own weight as it hangs to the floor. Place excess cable out of the way in a neatly coiled loop. Caution

    Do not let fiber-optic cables hang free from the connector. Do not allow the fastened loops of a cable to dangle, which stresses the cable at the fastening point.

    Caution

    Avoid bending a fiber-optic cable beyond its minimum bend radius. An arc smaller than a few inches in diameter can damage the cable and cause problems that are difficult to diagnose.

  11. Use one of the following methods to bring the MIC online:
    • Press the MIC offline/online button until the MIC OK/FAIL LED lights green.

    • Issue the following CLI command:

      user@host> request chassis mic fpc-slot slot-number mic-slot slot-number online

    The normal functioning status LED confirms that the MIC is online. You can also verify correct MIC functioning by issuing the show chassis fpc pic-status command described in Maintaining the MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 MICs.

Figure 4: Installing a MIC
Installing a MIC

Installing an MX10, MX40, MX80, and MX104 Dual-Wide MIC

To install a dual-wide MIC (see Figure 6):

  1. Wrap and fasten one end of the ESD grounding strap around your bare wrist, and connect the other end of the strap to an ESD point.
  2. If the MIC uses fiber-optic cable, verify that a rubber safety cap is over each transceiver on the faceplate. Install a cap if necessary.
  3. Remove the septum, if necessary (see Figure 5):
    1. Lift the latch in the center of the two MIC slots to disengage the septum from the chassis.
    2. Slide the septum toward you, and then lift the septum out of the slot.
    3. Store the septum for later use.
    Figure 5: Removing the Septum
    Removing the Septum
  4. Pull the ejector lever above both MIC slots away from the router.
  5. Align the rear of the MIC with the guides located at the corners of the MIC slot.
  6. Slide the MIC into the MIC slot until it is firmly seated in the chassis.Caution

    Slide the MIC straight into the slot to avoid damaging the components on the MIC.

  7. Verify that the ejector levers are engaged by pushing them toward the router.
  8. If the MIC uses fiber-optic cable, remove the rubber safety cap from each transceiver and the end of each cable.Warning

    Do not look directly into a fiber-optic transceiver or into the ends of fiber-optic cables. Fiber-optic transceivers and fiber-optic cables connected to a transceiver emit laser light that can damage your eyes.

    Caution

    Do not leave a fiber-optic transceiver uncovered except when you are inserting or removing cable. The safety cap keeps the port clean and prevents accidental exposure to laser light.

  9. Insert the appropriate cables into the cable connectors on the MIC.
  10. Arrange each cable to prevent the cable from dislodging or developing stress points. Secure the cable so that it is not supporting its own weight as it hangs to the floor. Place excess cable out of the way in a neatly coiled loop. Caution

    Do not let fiber-optic cables hang free from the connector. Do not allow the fastened loops of a cable to dangle, which stresses the cable at the fastening point.

    Caution

    Avoid bending a fiber-optic cable beyond its minimum bend radius. An arc smaller than a few inches in diameter can damage the cable and cause problems that are difficult to diagnose.

  11. Use one of the following methods to bring the MIC online:
    • Press the MIC offline/online button until the MIC OK/FAIL LED lights green.

    • Issue the following CLI command:

      user@host> request chassis mic fpc-slot slot-number mic-slot slot-number online

    The normal functioning status LED confirms that the MIC is online. You can also verify correct MIC functioning by issuing the show chassis fpc pic-status command described in Maintaining the MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 MICs.

Figure 6: Installing a Dual-Wide MIC
Installing a
Dual-Wide MIC

Replacing an MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 SFP or XFP Transceiver

Small form-factor pluggable transceivers (SFPs) and 10-gigabit small form-factor pluggables (XFPs) are optical transceivers that are installed in a MIC. SFPs and XFPs are hot-insertable and hot-removable.

Removing an MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 Transceiver

Removing an SFP or XFP transceiver does not interrupt MIC functioning, but the removed SFP or XFP no longer receives or transmits data.

To remove an SFP or XFP transceiver (see Figure 7):

  1. Have ready a replacement transceiver or a transceiver slot plug, an antistatic mat, and a rubber safety cap for the transceiver.
  2. Wrap and fasten one end of the ESD grounding strap around your bare wrist, and connect the other end of the strap to an ESD point.
  3. Label the cables connected to the transceiver so that you can reconnect them correctly later. Warning

    Do not look directly into a fiber-optic transceiver or into the ends of fiber-optic cables. Fiber-optic transceivers and fiber-optic cables connected to a transceiver emit laser light that can damage your eyes.

  4. Remove the cable connector from the transceiver.
  5. Pull the ejector handle out from the transceiver to unlock the transceiver. Caution

    Make sure that you open the ejector handle completely until you hear it click. This prevents damage to the transceiver.

    Use needlenose pliers to pull the ejector handle out from the transceiver.

  6. Grasp the transceiver ejector handle, and pull the transceiver approximately 0.5 in. (1.3 cm) out of the MIC.
  7. Using your fingers, grasp the body of the transceiver, and pull it the rest of the way out of the MIC.
    Figure 7: Removing SFPs or XFPs
    Removing SFPs or XFPs
  8. Place a rubber safety cap over the transceiver.
  9. Place the removed transceiver on an antistatic mat or in an electrostatic bag.
Caution

After removing a transceiver from the chassis, wait at least 30 seconds before reinserting it or inserting a transceiver into a different slot.

Installing an MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 Transceiver

To install an SFP or XFP:

  1. Wrap and fasten one end of the ESD grounding strap around your bare wrist, and connect the other end of the strap to an ESD point.
  2. Take each transceiver to be installed out of its electrostatic bag, and identify the slot on the component where it will be installed.
  3. Verify that each transceiver is covered by a rubber safety cap. If it is not, cover the transceiver with a safety cap.
  4. Carefully align the transceiver with the slots in the component. The connectors should face the component.
  5. Slide the transceiver until the connector is seated in the component slot. If you are unable to fully insert the transceiver, make sure the connector is facing the right way.
  6. Close the ejector handle of the transceiver.
  7. Remove the rubber safety cap from the transceiver and the end of the cable. Insert the cable into the transceiver.Warning

    Do not look directly into a fiber-optic transceiver or into the ends of fiber-optic cables. Fiber-optic transceivers and fiber-optic cables connected to a transceiver emit laser light that can damage your eyes.

  8. Verify that the status LEDs on the component faceplate indicate that the SFP or XFP is functioning correctly. For more information about the component LEDs, see the MX Series Interface Module Reference.

Maintaining Cables That Connect to MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 MICs

Purpose

For optimum router performance, verify the condition of the cables that connect to the MICs.

Action

On a regular basis:

  • Use the cable management bracket to support cables and prevent cables from dislodging or developing stress points.

  • Place excess cable out of the way in the cable management bracket. Do not allow fastened loops of cable to dangle from the connector or cable management bracket, because this stresses the cable at the fastening point. Putting fasteners on the loops helps to maintain their shape.

  • Keep the cable connections clean and free of dust and other particles, which can cause drops in the received power level. Always inspect cables and clean them if necessary before connecting an interface.

  • Label both ends of the cables to identify them.

The following guidelines apply specifically to fiber-optic cables:

  • When you unplug a fiber-optic cable, always place a rubber safety plug over the transceiver on the faceplate and on the end of the cable.

  • Anchor fiber-optic cables to avoid stress on the connectors. Be sure to secure fiber-optic cables so that they do not support their own weight as they hang to the floor. Never let fiber-optic cable hang free from the connector.

  • Avoid bending fiber-optic cable beyond its bend radius. An arc smaller than a few inches can damage the cable and cause problems that are difficult to diagnose.

  • Frequent plugging and unplugging of fiber-optic cable into and out of optical instruments can cause damage to the instruments that is expensive to repair. Instead, attach a short fiber extension to the optical equipment. Any wear and tear due to frequent plugging and unplugging is then absorbed by the short fiber extension, which is easy and inexpensive to replace.

  • Keep fiber-optic cable connections clean. Small microdeposits of oil and dust in the canal of the transceiver or cable connector could cause loss of light, reducing signal power and possibly causing intermittent problems with the optical connection.

    To clean the transceivers, use an appropriate fiber-cleaning device, such as RIFOCS Fiber Optic Adaptor Cleaning Wands (part number 946). Follow the directions for the cleaning kit you use.

    After you clean an optical transceiver, make sure that the connector tip of the fiber-optic cable is clean. Use only an approved alcohol-free fiber-optic cable cleaning kit, such as the Opptex Cletop-S Fiber Cleaner. Follow the directions for the cleaning kit you use.