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Troubleshooting the MX2008

 

MX2008 Troubleshooting Resources

Command-Line Interface

To troubleshoot an MX2008 router, you use the Junos OS CLI, alarms, devices connected to the alarm relay contacts, and LEDs on both the components and craft interface.

  • LEDs—When the Routing Engine detects an alarm condition, it lights the red or yellow alarm LED on the craft interface. In addition, you can also use the component-specific LEDs on the craft interface and on the faceplate of a component to troubleshoot the routing matrix.

  • Alarm devices connected to the alarm relay contact—When a red or yellow alarm occurs, it trips the corresponding alarm relay.

  • CLI—The CLI is the primary tool for controlling and troubleshooting hardware, Junos OS, routing protocols, and network connectivity. CLI commands display information about routing tables, information specific to routing protocols, and information about network connectivity derived from the ping and traceroute utilities.

You enter CLI commands on one or more external management devices connected to ports on the Routing Engine.

For information about using the CLI to troubleshoot Junos OS, see the appropriate Junos OS configuration guide.

  • JTAC—If you need assistance during troubleshooting, you can contact the Juniper Networks Technical Assistance Center (JTAC) by using the Web or by telephone. If you encounter software problems, or problems with hardware components not discussed here, contact JTAC.

Chassis and Interface Alarm Messages

When the Routing and Control Board (RCB) detects an alarm condition, it lights the red or yellow alarm LED on the craft interface as appropriate, trips the alarm relay, and reports the cause of the alarm in the craft interface. To view a more detailed description of the alarm cause, issue the show chassis alarms command:

user@host> show chassis alarms

There are two classes of alarm messages:

  • Chassis alarms indicate a problem with a chassis component such as the cooling system or power system.

  • Interface alarms indicate a problem with a specific network interface.

Alarm Relay Contacts

The craft interface has two alarm relay contacts for connecting the router to external alarm devices. Whenever a system condition triggers either the red or yellow alarm on the craft interface, the alarm relay contacts are also activated. The alarm relay contacts are located on the upper right of the craft interface.

Craft Interface LEDs

The craft interface displays system status messages and enables you to troubleshoot the MX2008 router. The craft interface is located on the upper front of the router and contains LEDs for the router components, the alarm relay contacts, and alarm cutoff button.

The craft interface includes the following LEDs:

  • Alarm LEDs—One large red circular LED and one large yellow triangular LED, located on the upper right of the craft interface, indicate two levels of alarm conditions. The circular red LED lights to indicate a critical condition that can result in a system shutdown. The triangular yellow LED lights to indicate a less severe condition that requires monitoring or maintenance. Both LEDs can be lit simultaneously. A condition that causes an alarm LED to light also activates the corresponding alarm relay contact on the craft interface.

  • Host subsystem LEDs—The host subsystem consists of a Routing and Control Board (RCB). Three LEDs, MASTER, ONLINE, and OFFLINE, indicate the status of the Routing Engine function of the host subsystem. A green MASTER LED indicates that the host is functioning as the master. The ONLINE LED indicates that the host is online. The OFFLINE LED indicates that the host is installed but the Routing Engine is offline. The Routing Engine component of the host subsystem LEDs is located on the upper right of the craft interface and labeled RE0 and RE1.

  • Power supply module LEDs—A set of nine bicolor LEDs, labeled (PSM), indicates the status of each PSM. Green indicates that the PSM is functioning normally. Red indicates that the PSM is not functioning normally. The PSM LEDs are located at the top of the craft interface, and are labeled 0 through 8.

  • Line-card LEDs—Ten bicolor LEDs, LC0 through LC9, for the ten line cards (MPCs), indicate the status. Green indicates the line card is online, green blinking indicates that the line card is booting, and red indicates a failure. The line-card LEDs are located along the bottom of the craft interface.

  • SFB LEDs—Eight bicolor LEDs, SFB0 through SFB7, indicate the status of each SFB. Green indicates the SFB is online, green blinking indicates the SFB is booting, and red indicates a failure. The SFB LEDs are located along the middle of the craft interface along the bottom.

  • RCB—Two bicolor LEDs, CB-RE0 and CB-RE1, indicate the status of each RCB. Green indicates the RCB is online, green blinking indicates the RCB is booting, and red indicates a failure. The RCB LEDs are located along the bottom far left and far right of the craft interface.

  • Fan tray LEDs—Four bicolor LEDs, 0 through 3, indicate the status of the upper two and lower two fan trays. Green indicates the fan trays are functioning normally, and red indicates that a fan tray has failed. The fan tray LEDs are located on the upper middle of the craft interface.

Component LEDs

The following LEDs are located on various router components and display the status of those components:

  • MPC LED—One LED labeled OK/FAIL on each MPC faceplate indicates the MPC's status. For more information, see the MX Series Interface Module Reference.

  • MIC LED—One LED labeled OK/FAIL on each MIC faceplate indicates the MIC's status. For more information, see the MX Series Interface Module Reference.

  • SFB LEDs—One LED, labeled OK/FAIL, on each SFB faceplate indicate the status of the SFB. If no LEDs are lit, the master RCB might still be booting or the SFB is not receiving power.

  • RCB LEDs—For the Control Board portion of the RCB, there is a set of bicolor LEDs, labeled OK/FAIL, LINK, ExtClk-0, ExtClk-1, BITS, and GPS. For the Routing Engine portion of the RCB, there are three LEDs, labeled ONLINE, MASTER, and OK/FAIL. These LEDs on the faceplate indicate the status of the RCB.

    Note

    Even though the RCB are combined into one unit; the LED functionality is separate for the Control Board and Routing Engine.

  • AC delta or wye PDM LEDs—One LED for each input terminal block indicating the input feed status.

  • DC PDM LEDs—One LED on each PDM next to each of the nine –48VDC power feeds indicates the status of that PDM’s incoming power.

  • Universal (HVAC/HVDC) PDM LEDs—One LED on each PDM next to each of the nine power feeds indicates the status of that PDM’s incoming power.

  • AC, DC, or universal PSM LEDs—Four LEDs, labeled PWR OK, FAULT, INP0, and INP1, on each PSM faceplate indicate the status of that PSM.

Troubleshooting the MX2008 Cooling System

Problem

Description: The following alarms, LEDs, and other conditions indicate a problem with the cooling system:

  • A red alarm indicates that temperature of the router exceeds the maximum (“temperature hot”) threshold.

  • Automatic shutdown of the power system was caused by the temperature of the router exceeding the maximum (“temperature hot”) threshold.

  • A red alarm indicates that a fan failed.

  • A yellow alarm indicates that the router temperature exceeds the “temperature warm” threshold.

  • A yellow alarm indicates that one of the fan trays was removed.

  • One or more fans in a fan tray function at full speed. The RCB constantly monitors the temperatures detected by sensors on the midplane and router components, adjusting the speed of the fans as necessary.

Solution

To troubleshoot the cooling system:

  1. Place your hand near the exhaust vents at the back of the chassis to determine whether the fans are pushing air out of the chassis.
  2. If the red alarm LED on the craft interface lights, look at the craft interface display to find the source of the problem. The number of alarm conditions, as well as the source of each alarm, appears on the screen.
  3. If the craft interface display lists only one fan failure and the other fans are functioning normally, the fan is probably faulty and you need to replace the fan tray.
  4. Use the CLI to check the status of the fans. For example, you can issue the following command to get information about the source of an alarm condition:

    user@host>show chassis alarms

    For information about the alarms (see Table 1).

    Table 1: MX2008 Cooling System Alarms

    Component

    Alarm Type

    CLI Message

    Alarm Condition

    Solution

    Fans

    Red

    fan-name Failure

    A fan has failed.

    Replace the fan tray.

    Temperature sensors

    Red

    Temperature Hot

    The chassis temperature exceeded the hot temperature threshold. If this condition persists, the router shuts down.

    • Verify that the room temperature is within acceptable limits.

    • Verify that there is sufficient air flow.

    • Verify that the cooling system in the chassis is operating properly.

    Temperature sensor failure

    A temperature sensor failed.

    Contact JTAC

    Yellow

    Temperature Warm

    The chassis temperature exceeded the warm temperature threshold.

    • Verify that the room temperature is within acceptable limits.

    • Verify that there is sufficient air flow.

    • Verify that the cooling system in the chassis is operating properly.

Troubleshooting the MX2000 Router Power System

Problem

Description: The following alarms, LEDs, and other conditions indicate a problem with the AC or DC power system:

  • If all AC, DC, universal power supply modules (PSMs) have failed, the system temperature might have exceeded the threshold, causing the system to shut down.

  • The yellow PWR OK LED blinks when an AC or a DC PSM is out of the power limit or is in an overcurrent condition.

  • The red FAULT LED lights when the PSM is not receiving enough airflow to maintain the proper temperature.

  • The red FAULT LED lights when the AC or DC output voltages are not within range.

  • The yellow INP0 LED blinks when the AC or DC voltage is present, but out of limits. This LED blinks continuously for approximately a few seconds on and a few seconds off.

  • The yellow INP1 LED blinks when the AC or DC voltage is present, but out of limits. This LED blinks continuously for approximately a few seconds on and a few seconds off.

  • The red -48V LED lights when the wrong polarity of DC input voltage is connected on the DC PDM.

    Note

    For the universal power supply LEDs, see MX2020 High-Voltage Universal Power Supply Module LEDs and MX2010 High-Voltage Universal (HVAC/HVDC) Power Supply Module LEDs.

Solution

To troubleshoot the MX2000 router power system:

  1. Check the LEDs on all AC, DC, or universal PSM faceplates.
    • PWR OK PSM LED is blinking—Check the fans and air filters to be sure that they are functioning and providing sufficient airflow through the chassis.

    • PWR OK PSM LED is off and no red alarm condition exists—Check that the circuit breakers are switched to the ON position. Check that the AC or DC power switch is in the on (|) position.

    • PWR OK LED on PSMs is not lit—Check that the PSMs are inserted and are operating.

    • If an AC PSM, or a DC PSM, or a universal PSM is correctly installed and functioning normally, the PWR OK, INP0, and INP1 LEDs light steadily, and the FAULT LED is not lit.

  2. Check the LEDs on each DC power distribution module (PDM) faceplate.
    • –48V or 240 V China PDM LED is off—Check that the PDM is receiving voltage.

    • –48V or 240 V China PDM LED is lit red—Check that the PDM is connected to correct input voltage and polarity.

      Note

      This does not apply to the 240 V China DC PDM.

    • Check that the DC PDM switch is set to 60 A or 80 A depending on the current feed coming from the DC source circuit breaker.

    • –48V or 240 V China LED on a DC PDM is not lit—Check that the input is receiving source DC power.

    • If a DC PDM is correctly installed and functioning normally, the –48V source input LEDs light green steadily.

  3. Check the LEDs on each AC PDM faceplate. There is one LED for each input feed. See Mapping Input Power from AC Power Distribution Modules to AC Power Supply Modules on MX2000 Routers.
    • On the three-phase delta AC PDM, the left arrow () green LED is lit steadily, indicating that the left input feed is receiving voltage.

    • On the three-phase delta AC PDM, the right arrow () green LED is lit steadily, indicating that the right input feed is receiving voltage.

    • On the three-phase wye AC PDM, the left arrow () green LED is lit steadily, indicating that the left input feed is receiving voltage.

    • On the three-phase wye AC PDM, the right arrow () green LED is lit steadily, indicating that the right input feed is receiving voltage.

    • On the single-phase AC PDM or universal PDM, the green LED for each feed is lit steadily, indicating the input feed is receiving voltage.

  4. Verify that the source circuit breaker has the proper current rating. Each PDM must be connected to a separate source circuit breaker. Check that the AC or DC circuit breaker is in the on (ON) position.
  5. Verify that the DC power cable, or the AC power cord, or the universal power cord from the power source to the router is not damaged. If the insulation is cracked or broken, immediately replace the power cord.
  6. Connect the PDM to a different power source with new power cables. If the PSM PWR OK LED still does not light, the PSM is the source of the problem. Replace the PSM with a spare.

    If the PWR OK LED on the installed spare does not light, the replaced PSM might be faulty. To return it for replacement, see Contacting Customer Support.

  7. Check the status of a PSM, issuing the following CLI command. The value Online in the rows labeled State indicates that each of the PSMs is functioning normally.Note

    For the MX2010, the PSMs are referred to as PSM0 through PSM8.

    For the MX2020, the PSMs are referred to as PSM0 through PSM8 (bottom) and PSM9 through PSM17 (top).

    Here is an example of the AC PSM input status for an MX2020:

    user@host> show chassis environment psm

    Here is an example of the DC PSM (-48) input status for an MX2020:

    user@host> show chassis environment psm

    Here is an example of the DC PSM (240 V China) input status for an MX2020:

    user@host> show chassis environment psm
    Note

    If two input sources are grounded at the positive terminal (i.e. -240 V DC source) and if both positive input wiring are connected to the PDM, the PSM reports both inputs to be active and reports the higher of the two -240V DC input source. This is the case even if one negative input source is switched off through a breaker.

    Note

    For midpoint impedance grounded source, the CLI display of the input voltage is inaccurate for the input source with lower input voltage. For example, if one source is +/-120V, and the other source is +/-125V, the CLI input voltage display is 250 V for one input, and is 245 V (should be 240 V) for the other.

    Here is an example of the universal PSM (HVAC/HVDC) input status for an MX2020:

    user@host> show chassis environment psm

    Here is an example of the universal PSM (HVAC/HVDC) input status for an MX2008:

    user@host> show chassis environment psm
  8. If a red alarm condition occurs, issue the show chassis alarms command to determine the source of the problem.
  9. If all PSMs have failed, the system temperature might have exceeded the threshold, causing the system to shut down.Note

    If the system temperature exceeds the threshold, the Junos OS shuts down all power supplies so that no status is displayed.

    The Junos OS also can shut down one of the power supplies for other reasons. In this case, the remaining power supplies provide power to the router, and you can still view the system status through the CLI or display.

Troubleshooting the MX2008 Host Subsystems

Problem

Description: The following alarms and LEDs indicate a problem with a host subsystem Routing and Control Board (RCB):

  • A red alarm indicates that the host subsystem has been removed.

  • The red host subsystem OFFLINE LED on the craft interface is lit.

  • The green host subsystem ONLINE LED on the craft interface is not lit.

Solution

To troubleshooting the host subsystems:

  1. Check the LEDs on the faceplate of each RCB.
  2. Check the LEDs on the craft interface.
  3. Use the CLI to check the alarms.
    • Issue the show chassis alarms command to view the alarms.

Troubleshooting the MX2008 MICs

Problem

Description: A MIC LED lit red indicates a problem with the MIC.

Solution

To troubleshoot a MIC:

  1. Check the status of each port on a MIC by looking at the LED located on the MIC faceplate. For information about the meaning of LED states on different MICs, see the MX Series Interface Module Reference
  2. Check the status of a MIC by issuing the show chassis fpc pic-status CLI command. The MIC slots in the MPC are labeled PIC 0/1 and PIC 2/3, top to bottom:
    user@host> show chassis fpc pic-status

    For further description of the command output, see the Junos OS System Basics and Services Command Reference  .

Troubleshooting the MX2008 MPCs

Problem

Description: The following LEDs indicate a problem with an MPC:

  • The red FAIL LED above the MPC is lit.

  • The green OK LED above the MPC is not lit.

Solution

To troubleshoot an MPC:

  1. Monitor the green LED labeled OK above the MPC on the craft interface as soon as an MPC is seated in an operating router.Note

    The Routing and Control Board (RCB) downloads the software to the MPC under two conditions: The MPC is present when the RCB boots Junos OS, and the MPC is installed and requested online through the CLI or the push button on the front panel. The MPC then runs diagnostics, during which the OK LED blinks. When the MPC is online and functioning normally, the OK LED lights green steadily.

  2. Look at the display on the craft interface to check the status of the MPC and the MICs that are plugged into it.
  3. Verify that the MPC is properly seated in the top and bottom backplanes of the adapter card (ADC). Check that each knob has been turned clockwise and is tight.
  4. Check the OK/FAIL LED on the MPC, and the OK and FAIL line-card LEDs, LC0 through LC9, on the craft interface. When the MPC is online and functioning normally, the OK LED lights green steadily.
  5. Check the status of an MPC by using the show chassis fpc CLI command. As shown in the sample output, the value Online in the column labeled State indicates that the MPC is functioning normally:
    user@host> show chassis fpc

    Use the detail option to display more detailed information. The following example does not specify a slot number, which is optional:

    For further description of the command output, see the Junos OS System Basics Configuration Guide  .

    user@host> show chassis fpc detail