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EX8208 Site Guidelines and Requirements

 

Environmental Requirements and Specifications for EX Series Switches

The switch must be installed in a rack or cabinet housed in a dry, clean, well-ventilated, and temperature-controlled environment.

Ensure that these environmental guidelines are followed:

  • The site must be as dust-free as possible, because dust can clog air intake vents and filters, reducing the efficiency of the switch cooling system.

  • Maintain ambient airflow for normal switch operation. If the airflow is blocked or restricted, or if the intake air is too warm, the switch might overheat, leading to the switch temperature monitor shutting down the switch to protect the hardware components.

Table 1 provides the required environmental conditions for normal switch operation.

Table 1: EX  Series Switch Environmental Tolerances

Switch or device

Environment Tolerance

Altitude

Relative Humidity

Temperature

Seismic

EX2200-C

No performance degradation up to 5,000  feet (1524  meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (noncondensing)

Normal operation ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 104°   F (40° C) at altitudes up to 5,000  ft (1,524 m).

For information about extended temperature SFP transceivers supported on EX2200 switches, see Pluggable Transceivers Supported on EX2200 Switches.

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

EX2200 (except EX2200-C switches)

No performance degradation up to 10,000  feet (3048 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (noncondensing)

Normal operation ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 113°   F (45° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

EX2300-C

No performance degradation up to 5,000  feet (1524 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (noncondensing)

Normal operation ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 104°   F (40° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

EX2300 (except EX2300-C switches)

No performance degradation up to 13,000  feet (3962 meters) at 104°   F (40° C) as per GR-63

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (noncondensing)

Normal operation ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 113°   F (45° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

EX3200

No performance degradation up to 10,000  feet (3048 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (noncondensing)

Normal operation ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 113°   F (45° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

EX3300

No performance degradation up to 10,000  feet (3048 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (noncondensing)

Normal operation ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 113°   F (45° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

EX3400

No performance degradation up to 10,000  feet (3048 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (noncondensing)

Normal operation ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 113°   F (45° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

EX4200

No performance degradation up to 10,000  feet (3048 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (noncondensing)

Normal operation ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 113°   F (45° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

EX4300

EX4300 switches except the EX4300-48MP model— No performance degradation up to 10,000  feet (3048 meters)

EX4300-48MP model— No performance degradation up to 6,000  feet (1829 meters)

EX4300 switches except the EX4300-48MP model— Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (noncondensing)

EX4300-48MP model— Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 5% through 90% (noncondensing)

Normal operation ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 113°   F (45° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

EX4500

No performance degradation up to 10,000  feet (3048 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (noncondensing)

Normal operation ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 113°   F (45° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

EX4550

No performance degradation up to 10,000  feet (3048 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (noncondensing)

  • EX4550-32F switches— Normal operation ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 113°   F (45° C)

  • EX4550-32T switches— Normal operation is ensured in the temperature range 32°   F through 104°   F (40° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

EX4600

No performance degradation to 6,562  feet (2000 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 5% through 90%, noncondensing

  • Short-term operation ensured in the relative humidity range 5% through 93%, noncondensing

    Note: As defined in NEBS GR-63-CORE, Issue 4, short-term events can be up to 96 hours in duration but not more than 15 days per year.

  • Normal operation ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 113°   F (45° C)

  • Nonoperating storage temperature in shipping container: – 40°   F (–40° C) through 158°   F (70° C)

Designed to comply with Zone 4 earthquake requirements per NEBS GR-63-CORE, Issue 4.

EX4650

No performance degradation to 6,000  feet (1829 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (condensing)

Normal operation is ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 104°   F (40° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

EX6210

No performance degradation up to 10,000  feet (3048 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (noncondensing)

Normal operation is ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 104°   F (40° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

EX8208

No performance degradation up to 10,000  feet (3048 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (noncondensing)

Normal operation is ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 104°   F (40° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

EX8216

No performance degradation up to 10,000  feet (3048 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (noncondensing)

Normal operation is ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 104°   F (40° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

EX9204

No performance degradation up to 10,000  feet (3048 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 5% through 90% (noncondensing)

Normal operation is ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 104°   F (40° C)

Nonoperating storage temperature in shipping container: – 40°   F (–40° C) to 158°   F (70° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63.

EX9208

No performance degradation up to 10,000  feet (3048 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 5% through 90% (noncondensing)

Normal operation is ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 104°   F (40° C)

Nonoperating storage temperature in shipping container: – 40°   F (–40° C) to 158°   F (70° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63.

EX9214

No performance degradation up to 10,000  feet (3048 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 5% through 90% (noncondensing)

Normal operation is ensured in the temperature range 32°   F (0° C) through 104°   F (40° C)

Nonoperating storage temperature in shipping container: – 40°   F (–40° C) through 158°   F (70° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63.

EX9251

The maximum thermal output is 1705  BTU/hour (500 W).

No performance degradation up to 10,000  ft (3048 m)

Normal operation ensured in relative humidity range of 5% to 90%, noncondensing

Normal operation ensured in temperature range of 32°   F (0° C) to 104°   F (40° C)

Nonoperating storage temperature in shipping container: – 40°   F (–40° C) to 158°   F (70° C)

Complies with Telcordia Technologies Zone 4 earthquake requirements

XRE200

No performance degradation up to 10,000  feet (3048 meters)

Normal operation ensured in the relative humidity range 10% through 85% (noncondensing)

Normal operation ensured in the temperature range 41°   F (5° C) through 104°   F (40° C)

Complies with Zone 4 earthquake requirements as per GR-63, Issue 4.

Note

Install EX  Series switches only in restricted areas, such as dedicated equipment rooms and equipment closets, in accordance with Articles 110– 16, 110– 17, and 110– 18 of the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70.

General Site Guidelines

Efficient device operation requires proper site planning and maintenance and proper layout of the equipment, rack or cabinet (if used), and wiring closet.

To plan and create an acceptable operating environment for your device and prevent environmentally caused equipment failures:

  • Keep the area around the chassis free from dust and conductive material, such as metal flakes.

  • Follow prescribed airflow guidelines to ensure that the cooling system functions properly and that exhaust from other equipment does not blow into the intake vents of the device.

  • Follow the prescribed electrostatic discharge (ESD) prevention procedures to prevent damaging the equipment. Static discharge can cause components to fail completely or intermittently over time.

  • Install the device in a secure area, so that only authorized personnel can access the device.

Site Electrical Wiring Guidelines

Table 2 describes the factors you must consider while planning the electrical wiring at your site.

Warning

It is particularly important to provide a properly grounded and shielded environment and to use electrical surge-suppression devices.

Table 2: Site Electrical Wiring Guidelines

Site Wiring Factor

Guidelines

Signaling limitations

If your site experiences any of the following problems, consult experts in electrical surge suppression and shielding:

  • Improperly installed wires cause radio frequency interference (RFI).

  • Damage from lightning strikes occurs when wires exceed recommended distances or pass between buildings.

  • Electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) caused by lightning damage unshielded conductors and electronic devices.

Radio frequency interference

To reduce or eliminate RFI from your site wiring, do the following:

  • Use a twisted-pair cable with a good distribution of grounding conductors.

  • If you must exceed the recommended distances, use a high-quality twisted-pair cable with one ground conductor for each data signal when applicable.

Electromagnetic compatibility

If your site is susceptible to problems with electromagnetic compatibility (EMC), particularly from lightning or radio transmitters, seek expert advice.

Some of the problems caused by strong sources of electromagnetic interference (EMI) are:

  • Destruction of the signal drivers and receivers in the device

  • Electrical hazards as a result of power surges conducted over the lines into the equipment

Clearance Requirements for Airflow and Hardware Maintenance for an EX8208 Switch

When planning the site for installing an EX8208 switch, you must allow sufficient clearance around the switch.

Note

To manage airflow in a hot-aisle--cold-aisle data center setup, you might want to use the customized rack solution for EX8200 switches offered by Chatsworth Products, Inc.

  • Allow at least 6 in. (15.2 cm) of clearance on each side of the chassis. For the cooling system to function properly, the airflow around the chassis must be unrestricted. See Figure 1.

    Figure 1: Airflow Through the EX8208 Switch Chassis
    Airflow Through
the EX8208 Switch Chassis
  • If you are mounting the switch on a rack or cabinet along with other equipment, ensure that the exhaust from other equipment does not blow into the intake vents of the chassis.

  • Leave at least 24 in. (61 cm) both in front of and behind the switch. Allow at least 6 in. (15.2 cm) of clearance on each side of the chassis. Leave adequate space at the front of the switch for service personnel to remove and install hardware components. NEBS GR-63 recommends that you allow at least 30 in. (76.2 cm) in front of the rack or cabinet and 24 in. (61 cm) behind the rack or cabinet. See Figure 2.

    Figure 2: Clearance Requirements for Airflow and Hardware Maintenance for an EX8208 Switch Chassis
     Clearance
Requirements for Airflow and Hardware Maintenance for an EX8208 Switch
Chassis

Rack Requirements

You can mount the device on two-post racks or four-post racks.

Rack requirements consist of:

  • Rack type

  • Mounting bracket hole spacing

  • Rack size and strength

  • Rack connection to the building structure

Table 3 provides the rack requirements and specifications.

Table 3: Rack Requirements and Specifications

Rack Requirement

Guidelines

Rack type

You can mount the device on a rack that provides bracket holes or hole patterns spaced at 1  U (1.75 in. or 4.45 cm) increments and meets the size and strength requirements to support the weight.

A U is the standard rack unit defined by the Electronic Components Industry Association (http://www.ecianow.org).

Mounting bracket hole spacing

The holes in the mounting brackets are spaced at 1 U (1.75 in. or 4.45 cm), so that the device can be mounted in any rack that provides holes spaced at that distance.

Rack size and strength

  • Ensure that the rack complies with the size and strength standards of a 19-in. rack as defined by the Electronic Components Industry Association (http://www.ecianow.org).

  • Ensure that the rack rails are spaced widely enough to accommodate the external dimensions of the device chassis. The outer edges of the front mounting brackets extend the width of the chassis to 19 in. (48.2 cm).

  • The rack must be strong enough to support the weight of the device.

  • Ensure that the spacing of rails and adjacent racks provides for proper clearance around the device and rack.

Rack connection to building structure

  • Secure the rack to the building structure.

  • If earthquakes are a possibility in your geographical area, secure the rack to the floor.

  • Secure the rack to the ceiling brackets as well as wall or floor brackets for maximum stability.

Cabinet Requirements

You can mount the device in a cabinet that contains a 19-in. rack.

Cabinet requirements consist of:

  • Cabinet size

  • Clearance requirements

  • Cabinet airflow requirements

Table 4 provides the cabinet requirements and specifications.

Table 4: Cabinet Requirements and Specifications

Cabinet Requirement

Guidelines

Cabinet size

  • The minimum cabinet size is 36 in. (91.4 cm) depth. Large cabinets improve airflow and reduce chances of overheating.

Cabinet clearance

  • The outer edges of the front mounting brackets extend the width of the chassis to 19 in. (48.2 cm).

  • The minimum total clearance inside the cabinet is 30.7 in. (780 mm) between the inside of the front door and the inside of the rear door.

Cabinet airflow requirements

When you mount the device in a cabinet, ensure that ventilation through the cabinet is sufficient to prevent overheating.

  • Ensure adequate cool air supply to dissipate the thermal output of the device or devices.

  • Ensure that the hot air exhaust of the chassis exits the cabinet without recirculating into the device. An open cabinet (without a top or doors) that employs hot air exhaust extraction from the top ensures the best airflow through the chassis. If the cabinet contains a top or doors, perforations in these elements assist with removing the hot air exhaust.

  • Install the device in the cabinet in a way that maximizes the open space on the side of the chassis that has the hot air exhaust.

  • Route and dress all cables to minimize the blockage of airflow to and from the chassis.

  • Ensure that the spacing of rails and adjacent cabinets is such that there is proper clearance around the device and cabinet.

  • A cabinet larger than the minimum required provides better airflow and reduces the chance of overheating.

Power Requirements for EX8208 Switch Components

Table 5 lists the power requirements for different hardware components of an EX8208 switch under typical voltage conditions.

Table 5: EX8208 Switch Component Power Requirements

Components

Power Requirements (Watts)

Fan tray

  • 300 W (at normal fan speed)

  • 1100 W (at maximum fan speed)

Switch Fabric and Routing Engine (SRE) module

200 W

Switch Fabric (SF) module

100 W

8-port SFP+ line card (including optical transceivers)

450 W

40-port SFP+ line card (including optical transceivers)

550 W

EX8200-2XS-40P line card (including optical transceivers)

387 W

EX8200-2XS-40T line card (including optical transceivers)

350 W

EX8200-48PL line card

267 W

EX8200-48TL line card

230 W

48-port SFP line card (including optical transceivers)

330 W

48-port RJ-45 line card

350 W

Calculating Power Requirements for an EX8208 Switch

Use the information in this topic to calculate power consumption, system thermal output, and number of power supplies required for different EX8208 switch configurations.

Before you begin these calculations:

This topic describes these tasks.

Calculating the Power Consumption of Your EX8208 Switch Configuration

Use the following procedure to determine the maximum power you need to supply to the switch. To calculate maximum system power consumption, you first determine the combined maximum internal power requirements of all the switch components and then divide this result by the power supply efficiency.

To calculate maximum system power consumption:

  1. Determine the maximum power consumption of the base chassis components (that is, the components other than the line cards):
    • Use Table 6 if your switch is configured for N+1 power redundancy or if your switch is configured for N+N power redundancy and is running Junos OS Release 10.1 or earlier.

    • Use Table 7 only if your switch is running Junos OS Release 10.2 or later and power management is configured for N+N power redundancy.

    Note

    In Junos OS Release 10.2 or later, if power management is configured for N+N redundancy, the maximum fan speed is lowered, reducing the chassis’ maximum power consumption.

    Table 6: Chassis Power Consumption for N+1 Configurations and for N+N Configurations Running Junos OS Release 10.1 or Earlier

    Chassis Component

    Base Configuration

    Redundant Configuration

    Fan tray

    1100 W

    1100 W

    Switch Fabric and Routing Engine (SRE) module

    200 W

    200 W

    Second SRE module

    200 W

    Switch Fabric module

    100 W

    100 W

    Total

    1400 W

    1600 W

    Table 7: Chassis Power Consumption for N+N Configurations Running Junos OS Release 10.2 or Later

    Chassis Component

    Base Configuration

    Redundant Configuration

    Fan tray

    700 W

    700 W

    SRE module

    200 W

    200 W

    SRE module

    200 W

    SF module

    100 W

    100 W

    Total

    1000 W

    1200 W

  2. Calculate the maximum internal power consumption of the entire switch by adding in the power requirements of each line card.

    For example, for a switch fully loaded with 8-port SFP+ line cards and using N+1 power redundancy, the maximum internal power consumption:

    = (chassis watts) + 8 (8-port SFP+ line card watts)

    = (1600 W + 8 (450 W))

    = (1600 W + 3600 W)

    = 5200 W

    For switches with PoE line cards, be sure to include the configured PoE power budget for each line card.

  3. Calculate the maximum system power consumption by dividing the maximum internal power consumption by the efficiency of the power supply. This accounts for the loss of energy within the power supply. Note

    The efficiency of a 2000 W AC power supply is approximately 90 percent when input is high-voltage line (200–240 VAC).

    The efficiency of a 2000 W AC power supply is approximately 87 percent when input is low-voltage line (100–120 VAC).

    For example, for a switch fully loaded with 8-port SFP+ line cards and using N+1 power redundancy with high-voltage line input, the maximum system power consumption:

    = (maximum internal power consumption) / (power supply efficiency)

    = (5200 W) / (0.90)

    = 5778 W



Calculating System Thermal Output for Your EX8208 Switch Configuration

Use the following procedure to calculate the system thermal output in British thermal units (BTU) per hour for your switch configuration.

To calculate the system thermal output:

  1. Determine the maximum system power consumption of your switch in watts. See Calculating the Power Consumption of Your EX8208 Switch Configuration for how to do so.
  2. Multiply the maximum system power consumption by 3.41.

    For example, for a switch fully loaded with 8-port SFP+ line cards and using N+1 power redundancy with high-voltage line input, the system thermal output:

    = (maximum system power consumption) x (3.41)

    = (5778 W) x (3.41) =

    = 19,703 BTU/hr

Note

Using the maximum system power consumption values to calculate the system thermal output often results in overprovisioning the cooling systems. Typical power consumption is about one-third lower than these calculated values.



Calculating the Number of Power Supplies Required for Your EX8208 Switch Configuration

Use this procedure to calculate the number of power supplies required by your switch configuration. The required power configuration for EX8208 switches is N+1. You can optionally configure your switch for N+N configuration. For example, you might want dual power feed redundancy with AC power supplies, which requires an N+N configuration.

To calculate the number of power supplies required for your switch configuration:

  1. Determine the power requirement of the base chassis (that is, the combined power requirements of the fan tray, SRE module or modules, and the SF module) by consulting Table 8.

    The watt values shown in Table 8 are the amount of power reserved by power management for the chassis in its power budget. It uses these values when calculating used and available power and when determining whether sufficient power exists to meet N, N+1, or N+N requirements.

    Starting with Junos OS Release 10.2, when power management is configured for N+N power redundancy, it reserves less power for the chassis so that more power is available for line cards.

    Table 8: Power Reserved for the Chassis

     

    Junos OS Release 10.1 or Earlier

    Junos OS Release 10.2 or Later

    N+1 Configuration

    1600 W

    1600 W

    N+N Configuration

    1600 W

    1200 W

    Note

    The amount of power that power management reserves for the chassis is a set value that does not vary depending on chassis components installed. The reserved power is the same for base and redundant configurations and for switches that do not have all base chassis components installed.

  2. To the power reserved for the chassis, add the power requirements of the line cards.

    For line card power requirements, refer to Power Requirements for EX8208 Switch Components. Do not include the PoE power budgets for PoE line cards in this step. Use only the base power requirements for all line cards.

    For example, for a switch fully loaded with 8-port SFP+ line cards and using N+1 power redundancy, the total power requirement:

    = reserved chassis watts + 8 (8–port SFP + line card watts)

    = 1600 W + 8 (450) W

    = 1600 W + 3600 W

    = 5200 W

    For a switch fully loaded with 8-port SFP+ line cards, using N+N power redundancy, and running Junos OS Release 10.2, the total power requirement:

    = reserved chassis watts + 8 (8–port SFP + line card watts)

    = 1200 W + 8 (450) W

    = 1200 W + 3600 W

    = 4800 W

  3. Calculate the number of power supplies (N) required to meet the total power requirement by dividing the total power requirement by the output wattage of one power supply and then rounding up. Note

    If the input is high-voltage line (200–220 VAC), the output wattage of a 2000 W AC power supply is 2000 W.

    If the input is low-voltage line (100–120 VAC), the output wattage of a 2000 W AC power supply is 1200 W.

    For example, for a switch fully loaded with 8-port SFP+ line cards and using N+1 power redundancy with high-voltage line input , the required power supplies (N):

    = (total power requirement) / (output wattage of power supply)

    = (5200 W) / (2000 W)

    = 2.6

    = 3 (rounded up)

    For a switch fully loaded with 8-port SFP+ line cards, using N+N power redundancy with high-voltage line input, and running Junos OS Release 10.2, the required power supplies (N):

    = (total power requirement) / (output wattage of power supply)

    = (4800 W) / (2000 W)

    = 2.4

    = 3 (rounded up)

  4. Add the number of power supplies needed to achieve the required power redundancy:
    • To achieve N+1 power redundancy, add a single power supply.

      For example, for a switch fully loaded with 8-port SFP+ line cards and using high-voltage line input, the total number of power supplies:

      = N + 1

      = 3 + 1

      = 4

    • To achieve N+N power redundancy, add N power supplies.

      For example, for a switch fully loaded with 8-port SFP+ line cards and using high-voltage line input, the total number of power supplies:

      = N + N

      = 3 + 3

      = 6

  5. If the switch has PoE line cards:

    1. Add the configured PoE power budgets for PoE line cards to the total power requirement value that you calculated in step 2.
    2. Calculate the number of power supplies needed to meet the new total power requirement by dividing the total power requirement by the output wattage of one power supply and then rounding up.
    3. Compare this result to the N+1 or N+N value you calculated in step 4. Use the greater of the two values to determine how many power supplies you require.

Note

We recommend that you maintain N +1 or N+N power supplies in your switch at all times. Replace failed power supplies immediately to prevent unexpected failures.

Power management raises a minor alarm if the number of online power supplies in your switch is less than the number required to maintain the configured power redundancy (N+1 in Junos OS Release 10.1 or earlier; N+1 or N+N in Junos OS Release 10.2 or later). If the problem is not corrected in 5 minutes, a major alarm is issued.

Power management raises a major alarm if the number of online power supplies in your switch is less than N power supplies. If your switch is running Junos OS Release 10.1 or earlier, all line cards are powered off. If your switch is running Junos OS Release 10.2 or later, power management provides power to line cards in priority order until power is exhausted. The remaining line cards are powered off.

If a new line card is installed in an operational switch, power management does not power on the line card if the increased power demand exceeds the total available power, including redundant power. If redundant power is used to power on the line card, a minor alarm is raised, which becomes a major alarm in 5 minutes if the condition is not corrected.

Power management does not take into account PoE budget allocations when raising alarms to indicate that N, N+1, or N+N requirements are not being met.