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Rack Requirements for a TX Matrix Plus Router

 

Rack Size and Strength

The TX Matrix Plus router can be installed in many types of racks, including four-post (telco) racks and open-frame racks. An example of an open-frame rack appears in Figure 1.

The TX Matrix Plus router is designed for installation in a 23-in. rack as defined in Cabinets, Racks, Panels, and Associated Equipment (document number EIA-310-D) published by the Electronics Components Industry Association (http://www.ecianow.org/).

The rack rails must be spaced widely enough to accommodate the TX Matrix Plus chassis's external dimensions: 52.0 in. (132.1 cm) high, 36.2 in. (91.9 cm) deep, and 21.4 in. (54.4 cm) wide.

The center-mounting brackets and front-mounting flanges extend the width to 23 in. (58.4 cm). The spacing of rails and adjacent racks must also allow for the clearance requirements around the TX Matrix Plus router and rack for airflow and maintenance.

The chassis height without the cable management system is 52 in. (132 cm or approximately 29.7 U). The cable management system comb panel assembly that installs on top of the chassis adds 17 in. (43.2 cm or approximately 9.7 U) to the height. You can install a TX Matrix Plus router in a rack that has at least 39.4 U of usable vertical space.

The cable management system on the rear of the chassis adds 9 in. (22.86 cm) to the depth.

Note

A U is the standard rack unit defined in Cabinets, Racks, Panels, and Associated Equipment (document number EIA-310-D) published by the Electronics Components Industry Association.

The holes in the center-mounting brackets and front-mounting flanges are spaced at 2 U (3.5 in. or 8.9 cm). The TX Matrix Plus router can be mounted in any rack that provides holes spaced at those distances.

The rack must be strong enough to support the weight of the fully configured TX Matrix Plus router, up to about 925 lb (420 kg).

Figure 1: Typical 23 -inch Open-Frame Rack
Typical 23 -inch Open-Frame
Rack

Connection to Building Structure

Always secure the rack to the structure of the building. If your geographical area is subject to earthquakes, bolt the rack to the floor. For maximum stability, also secure the rack to ceiling brackets.

Rack-Mounting Considerations

If you are installing a TX Matrix Plus router, or a standalone T1600 or T4000 router that you plan to integrate into a routing matrix, consider these guidelines to facilitate the integration:

  • You must install the TX Matrix Plus router in its own dedicated rack. Consider the height and weight of the TX Matrix Plus router.

  • Account for the total weight of the routing matrix. One TX Matrix Plus router weighs up to 925 lb (420 kg). Each T1600 LCC weighs up to approximately 606 lb (275 kg). If you stack two fully configured T1600 LCCs in one rack, it must be capable of supporting about 1212 lb (550 kg). If you stack two fully configured T4000 LCCs in one rack, it must be capable of supporting about 1327.2 lb (602 kg).

  • One TX Matrix Plus router and eight T1600 line-card chassis (LCCs):

    • Centralized rack configuration—Plan to use a minimum of five racks side by side.

    • Distributed rack configuration—Plan to use one rack for the TX Matrix Plus router, and four through eight racks for the T1600 LCCs (depending on whether you plan to install one or two T1600 LCCs in a single rack).

  • One TX Matrix Plus router and four line-card chassis (LCCs):

    • Centralized rack configuration—Plan to use a minimum of three racks side by side.

    • Distributed rack configuration—Plan to use one rack for the TX Matrix Plus router, and two through four racks for the LCCs (depending on whether you plan to install one or two LCCs in a single rack).

  • If you are installing an LCC in the bottom of an empty rack, reserve the top of the rack for the future installation of another LCC.

Routing Matrix Rack Configurations

A fully loaded routing matrix requires up to five 44-U, seismic-rated racks. Each TX Matrix Plus router requires one rack. You can place one or two

There are two types of rack configurations to consider when you plan and prepare for the installation of the routing matrix—centralized and distributed.

Centralized Rack Configuration

In the centralized rack configuration, racks are placed next to each other in a row. Figure 2 shows a rack view of a centralized rack configuration in which the left and right racks each hold two LCC , and the center rack holds the TX Matrix Plus router.

When planning a centralized rack configuration, consider the following:

  • If the raceway is less than 1 m above the racks, 5-m switching plane cables might be long enough to connect the system.

  • The total weight of the routing matrix and the heat it generates are concentrated in a relatively small area. You must ensure that your site can support the weight and your site cooling can adequately dissipate the heat.

  • You can order the centralized configuration as a turnkey solution, or you can configure it from existing standalone T1600 or T4000 routers.

Figure 2: Centralized Configuration—Rack View
Centralized Configuration—Rack
View

Distributed Rack Configuration

In the distributed rack configuration, the placement of the racks is more flexible.

When planning a distributed rack configuration, consider the following:

  • Ensure that the rack placement allows you to connect the LCC to the TX Matrix Plus router using the switching plane cables. The maximum switching plane cable length is 100 m.

  • The total weight and heat dissipation of the routing matrix are important in the distributed configuration, but not as critical as in the centralized configuration.