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Device Links

Device Links Overview

The proNX Optical Director must have a view of the topology of the network in order to create and manage optical services. With an accurate view of the topology, the proNX Optical Director can dynamically control the optical links in your network and determine the available service paths for the services that you subsequently create. In order to build the topology, the proNX Optical Director needs to know how devices are connected together, including:

See Table 47 for definitions of terms used in this section.

Table 47: Optical Network Glossary

Term

Definition

Amplifier site

A site containing a line amplifier device providing amplification of the incoming composite DWDM signals. An example of a line amplifier device is the TCX1000-ILA, which is an inline amplifier that provides amplification in both directions.

Device link

A link between any two managed devices. Device links represent the actual fibers installed between devices in your network.

Line span

A device link connecting the line ports of two devices together.

ROADM element

A TCX Series ROADM device that provides a wavelength switching function for a single degree in a ROADM node. This function can include switching wavelengths to another degree (that is, to another ROADM element for pass-through) and switching wavelengths for local add/drop access. An example of a ROADM element is the TCX1000 Programmable ROADM (TCX1000-RDM20), which is a 20-port ROADM device that provides wavelength switching between its 20 universal ports and its line port.

Additionally, there exist passive multiplexer/demultiplexer devices such as the 96-Channel Fixed Mux/Demux (FMD96) and the TCX1000 2-Degree 8-Channel Colorless Mux/Demux (2D8CMD), which attach to a TCX Series ROADM device to provide higher fan-out add/drop access to the individual wavelengths. While multiplexer/demultiplexers are physically distinct from the TCX Series ROADM devices they attach to, they are not logically standalone. For this reason, the proNX Optical Director models the multiplexer/demultiplexer device as an extension (that is, as a circuit pack) of a ROADM element.

ROADM node

A configuration of ROADM elements that together provide a specific role in an optical network. A ROADM node is conceptual only, and exists purely to convey the type of role that the constituent ROADM elements provide. Examples of ROADM nodes are single-degree terminal nodes and multi-degree add/drop nodes.

A ROADM node consists of as many ROADM elements as there are degrees. For example, a single-degree node consists of a single ROADM element. A four-degree node consists of four ROADM elements.

A ROADM node can be split between two or more sites. A split ROADM node is a highly survivable configuration where ROADM elements comprising a ROADM node are located at separate sites. A failure or outage at one site affects traffic at that site only. Add/drop traffic on the same ROADM node but at another site is not affected if the traffic is not configured to pass through the failed ROADM element.

Like a regular ROADM node, a split ROADM node is conceptual, and cannot be explicitly created or deleted. A ROADM node becomes a split ROADM node once you configure a device link between a universal port of a ROADM element at one site and a universal port of a ROADM element at a different site (subject to nodal loss constraints). See the TCX Series Optical Transport System Feature Guide for information on the maximum nodal loss that is allowed to occur on the fiber between ROADM elements within a ROADM node.

Tail facility

The link from the optical network edge to the client transponder. See Optical Service and Tail Facility Endpoints.

Topology

The ROADM topology, which is the topology concerned with how ROADM nodes are connected together, and consequently, how wavelengths are allocated in the network.

Note: The ROADM topology models an amplifier site as part of a line because line amplifiers operate on the composite DWDM signal and not on the individual wavelengths.

Figure 4 shows an example of how devices can be connected together in a 2-degree ROADM node. A 2-degree ROADM node contains two ROADM elements, with each ROADM element connected to a line (or degree). These ROADM elements are labelled A and B in the example.

ROADM Element A consists of a TCX1000-RDM20 and a 2D8CMD. The 2D8CMD connects to a universal port on the TCX1000-RDM20 in ROADM Element A and can optionally connect to a universal port on the TCX1000-RDM20 in ROADM Element B. By connecting to both TCX1000-RDM20 devices, the 2D8CMD has add/drop access to wavelengths on both degrees, which is a prerequisite to setting up a service with working and protection paths.

In contrast, ROADM Element B just consists of a TCX1000-RDM20, so it only has add/drop access to wavelengths on the line that it is attached to. The reason for this is that the TCX1000-RDM20 can only switch wavelengths between its universal ports and its line port. It cannot switch wavelengths from one universal port to another.

Figure 4: 2-Degree ROADM Node Example

2-Degree
ROADM Node Example

The endpoint or client transponder can be a standalone device or integrated within a router or a switch. The endpoint transponder can connect to the ROADM node in a couple of different ways. One way is to connect the endpoint transponder to a client port on the 2D8CMD in ROADM Element A to provide add/drop access to both degrees. By doing this, you can then set up a service with both working and protection paths through the network. The second way is to connect the endpoint transponder directly to a universal port on the TCX1000-RDM20 in either ROADM Element A (not shown) or ROADM Element B to provide add/drop access to the degree to which the TCX1000-RDM20 is attached.

The device links to the endpoint transponders are known as tail facilities, which are the connections between the optical network edge and the client device. The proNX Optical Director can be used to provision tail facility links to supported ports on Juniper Networks equipment as well as to provision the endpoints themselves. See Supported Tail Facility Endpoints for the list of the tail facility endpoints that the proNX Optical Director can configure.

Device links within a ROADM node and from a ROADM node to a tail facility endpoint must be manually provisioned.

Device links between ROADM nodes, between amplifier sites, and between ROADM nodes and amplifier sites, can be learned depending on which release of the proNX Optical Director and TCX1000-RDM20 you are running. These device links are called line spans because they connect to the line ports of the devices.

Provisioned Device Links

A provisioned device link is a device link that you explicitly create. A provisioned device link where both endpoints are within the same ROADM element is called a physical link. A provisioned device link where one endpoint resides outside the ROADM element is called an external link. For more information on external and physical links, see http://www.openroadm.org.

Note In Juniper Networks’ implementation, only device links that are provisioned have a physical or external type designation. Auto-learned device links are not associated with a link type.

It is important that your configured device links match the actual device links or unexpected behavior can occur.

Note When you provision a device link to a ROADM port, the ROADM port is automatically placed in-service administratively. You do not need to manually place the port in-service.

Auto-Learned Device Links

Automatic learning of line spans is supported if you are running proNX Optical Director release 2.2 or higher and the devices in your network are running the following releases:

The proNX Optical Director learns about the existence of line spans based on the Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) neighbor information that the devices report. While the proNX Optical Director can determine the neighbors from this data, it cannot determine the type of fiber used for the span because the type of fiber used cannot be automatically detected. Instead, the proNX Optical Director assumes a default fiber type for all line spans in the network.

Note If this default fiber type is different from the actual fiber type for a particular span, you will need to manually configure the fiber type for that span.

To change the fiber type, you have to create an external link based on the auto-learned link and then change the fiber type of the external link. The proNX Optical Director does not allow you to change the fiber type of an auto-learned device link directly because auto-learned data originates from the device and is read-only. For convenience, the proNX Optical Director user interface lets you perform this task as if you are editing the fiber type. See Editing the Fiber Type.

Nevertheless, it is important for you to be aware that when you change the fiber type of an auto-learned device link, you are actually creating a separate external link and assigning a fiber type to that external link. When the proNX Optical Director sees an external link and an auto-learned link sharing the same two endpoints, the proNX Optical Director uses the fiber type provisioned for the external link.

If you later physically unplug the fiber associated with the auto-learned device link, the auto-learned designation disappears from the table (in the Device Links Current page), but the entry remains to represent the newly created external link. You can delete this external link just like you can delete any other external link.

Note Unlike a provisioned link, an auto-learned link to a ROADM port does not automatically place the ROADM port administratively in-service. You will need to manually place the port in-service or create the external link for the line span. One way of creating the external link is to edit the fiber type.

Device Link Validation

The proNX Optical Director validates device links for network-wide consistency. The following provisioning inconsistencies are detected and alarmed:

See the TCX Series Optical Transport System Feature Guide for information on all alarms.

About the Device Links Current Page

To access this page, click the Network tab and select Device Links>Current in the left-nav bar.

Note In releases 2.1 and lower, this page is known as the Topology Provisioned page.

This page displays all the physical, external, and auto-learned device links on the discovered devices in your network. Note that the physical and external device links displayed are configured and might not represent the actual connectivity. When debugging link problems, you should first verify that the configured device links match the actual connectivity. To assist in the debugging, the proNX Optical Director raises an alarm if it is able to detect a misconfigured link. See the TCX Series Optical Transport System Feature Guide for information on all alarms.

Tasks You Can Perform

You can perform the following tasks from this page:

Field Descriptions

Table 48 explains the fields in the Device Links Current page.

Note A single row in the table in the Device Links Current page can represent two links. A provisioned external link that is also auto-learned is displayed as a single row.

Table 48: Fields in the Device Links Current Page

Field

Description

Source Site

The name of the site where the source device is located.

Source Device

The name and/or IP address of the device at the source end of the link. A device is assigned as a source or a destination when you create the link.

Source Port

The name of the port at the source device.

Source State

The state of the port at the source device. The format is operational-status (administrative-state). See Table 49.

Destination Site

The name of the site where the destination device is located.

Destination Device

The name and/or IP address of the device at the destination end of the link. A device is assigned as a source or a destination when you create the link.

Destination Port

The name of the port at the destination device.

Destination State

The state of the port at the destination device. The format is operational-status (administrative-state). See Table 49.

The destination state is not displayed if the destination device is undiscovered or if the destination port does not exist.

Auto Learned (via LLDP)

An indication of whether the link is auto-learned or not. Only line spans can be auto-learned.

A indicates that the link is auto-learned. A indicates that the link is not auto-learned. An N/A indicates that the auto-learned designation does not apply because the device link is not a line span. See Table 50.

Provisioned Type

The type of provisioned link:

  • Physical, for a device link where both endpoints are within the same ROADM element

  • External, for a device link where one endpoint is outside of the ROADM element

The proNX Optical Director automatically determines the type based on the link endpoints. You do not explicitly provision the type.

Note: An Incomplete designation is displayed for links on ROADM or ILA line ports when the far end of a link cannot be reconciled. This can occur when the far end port does not exist or when the far end port is an endpoint for another link.

Note: This field can be empty for auto-learned line spans. See Table 50.

Provisioned Fiber Type

The fiber type is one of the attributes used by the Optical Control Layer control algorithm. All common fiber types are supported:

  • Single Mode Fiber

  • LS (SMF-LS)

  • E-LEAF

  • Dispersion Shifted Fiber

  • TRUEWAVE Reduced Slope

  • TRUEWAVE Classic

  • NZ-DSF

This attribute is applicable to line spans only. The fiber type for universal port and client connections is Not Applicable.

Note: The fiber type for an auto-learned line span is set to Single Mode Fiber by default. It is grayed out to indicate that it is a default setting and not a provisioned value. See Table 50.

Loopback

A loopback indication is shown if the source and destination link endpoints are the same.

Table 49: Port State and Status Values

Port State / Status

Valid Values

Administrative State

  • In-Service - laser is enabled

  • Out-of-Service - laser is disabled

Operational Status

  • Up - port is operating normally

  • Down - port has detected a problem (for example, loss of signal on input) or is no longer processing the incoming signal due to automatic line shutdown (ALS) procedures

Table 50: Valid Combinations for Auto-Learned and Provisioned Device Links

Auto Learned

Provisioned Type

Provisioned Fiber Type

Description

N/A

Physical

<empty>

Refers to a provisioned physical link.

N/A

External

<empty>

Refers to a provisioned external link that is not a line span.

External

<any>

Refers to a line span that is provisioned.

<empty>

Single Mode Fiber (gray font)

Refers to a line span that is auto-learned.

The Fiber Type is set to Single Mode Fiber by default. It is grayed out to indicate a default setting and not a provisioned value.

External

<any>

Refers to a line span that is both auto-learned and provisioned.

Use this procedure to view a list of all links or to delete a specific link.

Procedure

  1. Click the Network tab and select Device Links>Current in the left-nav bar.

    A table listing all provisioned and auto-learned links in the network is displayed.

  2. If you want to delete a provisioned link, select the link (row) and click Delete. You can only delete a provisioned link. You cannot delete an auto-learned link.

    A confirmation dialog appears. Click Delete to confirm.

    When you delete a link, you should remove the physical fiber that the deleted link represents. This ensures that the configured topology matches the actual topology.

    Note Deleting a link that is provisioned and not auto-learned removes that link from proNX Optical Director control and management. This is service affecting for all services that traverse the link. You should not delete such a link if there are services that traverse the link. Additionally, if the deleted link has an endpoint on a TCX1000-RDM20 port, the port is automatically taken out of service (administratively).

Editing the Fiber Type

Use this procedure to change the fiber type of an auto-learned device link.

Note that you are not actually changing the fiber type. You are creating a new External link based on the auto-learned link and setting the fiber type of the newly created link.

If the line span being edited has an endpoint on a TCX1000-RDM20 port, that port is placed in service as a consequence of this task (because this task is equivalent to creating a device link).

Procedure

  1. Click the Network tab and select Device Links>Current in the left-nav bar.

    A table listing all provisioned and auto-learned links in the network is displayed.

  2. To change the fiber type for an auto-learned link, select the link (row) and click Edit. You can only edit a link that has the auto-learned designation.

    The Edit Fiber Type dialog appears.

  3. Specify the Fiber Type using the drop-down list.
  4. Click Save.

    This creates an External link based on the auto-learned link and sets the Fiber Type of the newly created link to the specified fiber type. If there are any endpoints on TCX1000-RDM20 ports, those ports are automatically placed in service (administratively).

To access this page, click the Network tab and select Device Links>Create Link in the left-nav bar.

This page displays fields that you fill in to create a device link in your network.

Tasks You Can Perform

You can create device links from this page.

Field Descriptions

Table 51 explains the fields in the Device Links Create Link page.

Table 51: Fields in the Device Links Create Link Page

Field

Description

Source1

 

Site

The site of the source endpoint of the link.

 

Device

The name and/or IP address of the ROADM or ILA device at the source site.

 

Circuit Pack

This can be one of the following at the source site:

  • the name of the ROADM device within the ROADM node if the source is a ROADM device, or

  • ILA, if the source is an ILA device, or

  • the name of the circuit pack on the tail facility endpoint if the source is a tail facility endpoint

 

Port

The port on the above Circuit Pack at the source site.

Destination1

 

Site

The site of the destination endpoint of the link.

 

Device

The name and/or IP address of the ROADM or ILA device at the destination site.

 

Circuit Pack

This can be one of the following at the destination site:

  • the name of the ROADM device within the ROADM node if the source is a ROADM device, or

  • ILA, if the source is an ILA device, or

  • the name of the circuit pack on the tail facility endpoint if the source is a tail facility endpoint

 

Port

The port on the above Circuit Pack at the destination site.

Fiber Type

The type of fiber being used on a ROADM or ILA line port. It is not applicable for links on other ports. The fiber type is one of the attributes used by the Optical Control Layer control algorithm.

Loopback

This sets the destination link endpoint to be the same as the source link endpoint. This is not supported for live deployments and is for future use.

1 The source and destination assignments are used only to distinguish between the two endpoints and can be assigned arbitrarily.

Procedure

Use this procedure to create a new link. Table 52 shows the allowed link endpoint combinations.

Source Link Endpoint1

Destination Link Endpoint1

Type2

A line port on a TCX1000-RDM20 or a TCX1000-ILA

A line port on a TCX1000-RDM20 or a TCX1000-ILA

External

A universal port on a TCX1000-RDM20

A line port on an FMD96

Physical

A universal port on a TCX1000-RDM20

A line port on a 2D8CMD

Physical if the 2D8CMD belongs to the TCX1000-RDM20

External otherwise

A universal port on a TCX1000-RDM20

A supported tail facility endpoint on Juniper Networks equipment.

See Supported Tail Facility Endpoints.

External

A client port on an FMD963 or on a 2D8CMD

A supported tail facility endpoint on Juniper Networks equipment.

See Supported Tail Facility Endpoints.

External

1 The source and destination designations are used only to distinguish between the two link endpoints. They are assigned arbitrarily and are interchangeable.

2 The proNX Optical Director implicitly determines the type based on the endpoints being interconnected. You do not explicitly provision the type.

3 The FMD96 is a fixed channel multiplexer/demultiplexer, which means that each client port is associated with a hardcoded fixed wavelength. When you create a link between an FMD96 client port and a tail facility endpoint, you must ensure that the tail facility endpoint is configured with a wavelength that matches the wavelength of the client port on the FMD96.

  1. Click the Network tab and select Device Links>Create Link in the left-nav bar.

    The Device Links Create page appears.

  2. Use the drop-down lists to populate the source Site, Device, Circuit Pack, and Port.

    When you select the Site, the Device drop-down list only shows the devices at that site. When you select the Device, the Circuit Pack drop-down list only shows the circuit packs on that device. When you select the Circuit Pack, the Port drop-down list only shows the ports on that circuit pack.

  3. Use the drop-down lists to populate the destination Site, Device, Circuit Pack, and Port.

    Only those destinations that can be connected to the source are available for selection. See Table 52 for details.

  4. Use the drop-down list to select the Fiber Type.
  5. Click Create to create the link or Reset to discard your changes.

    When you create a link on a TCX1000-RDM20 port, the proNX Optical Director places the port in service (administratively) and places the link under proNX Optical Director control.

Note Once the link is created, the link endpoint ports will no longer be available for selection in the drop-down lists. It might take a minute or two before the port availability in the drop-down list is updated. If you try to create another link before the drop-down list is updated, be careful not to select a port that is already in use as a link endpoint.

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