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Setting Up the Control Machine (Examples)

 

Setting Up the Control Machine in a CentOS-Based Distribution (Example)

Warning

This example procedure is unsupported and is included purely for informational purposes.

This procedure uses sample commands and shows outputs that are current as of the writing of this procedure. Because these examples include the installation of third-party tools and software, the commands and outputs might change over time without notice. Be sure to consult the latest third-party documentation for the most up-to-date installation instructions and examples.

Prerequisites

  • The control machine has access to the Internet.

Use this procedure to set up the control machine using a CentOS-based distribution.

There are a number of ways to set up the control machine. You can use an existing Linux installation or create a new one.

This procedure shows an example of setting up the control machine with a new minimal CentOS Linux installation. With the minimal CentOS Linux installation, you will need to download a few additional packages. There are many other ways to set up the control machine. Your procedure might be different. Because Linux installation can vary from release to release (even for the same Linux distribution), use this procedure as a guide only.

Note

This example assumes you are setting up a temporary control machine for the sole purpose of installing the proNX Optical Director software. As a temporary machine, you only need to select the most basic installation options. If you intend to use the control machine for other purposes, then select the options that match the requirements for those other purposes.

  1. Download the Minimal ISO from the CentOS download site (https://www.centos.org/download).
  2. Create a DVD or USB drive with that ISO image. You will need to use the appropriate disk imaging tool for the operating system on the machine on which you are creating the drive. You cannot simply copy the image onto the DVD or USB drive.
  3. Plug the network cable into the target control machine and ensure the machine has access to the Internet.

    The control machine must be able to reach the Internet for this procedure to download third-party software.

  4. Boot up the target control machine with the DVD or USB drive. You might need to change the BIOS boot-up sequence to boot from the DVD or USB drive before the hard drive.
  5. Follow the setup screens to set up Linux as you normally do:
    • Configure the language support and keyboard settings.

    • Configure the date and time settings.

    • Specify the installation destination (hard drive) where you want to install the OS. Choose the Automatically configure partitioning option.

    • Configure the network and host name and enable the Ethernet interface.

  6. Configure the root password.
  7. Reboot the machine when prompted.
  8. After the machine reboots, log in as root.
  9. Update the existing packages. CentOS uses Yellowdog Updater Modified (yum) for installing and updating packages. For example:
  10. Install the Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (epel). For example:
  11. Install Ansible.
  12. Install pip (package manager for Python).
  13. Install the Python netaddr module.
  14. Install wget.
  15. Optionally, install the Kubernetes command line tool (kubectl) in the home directory. This allows you to manage the cluster servers from the control machine.

    See https://kubernetes.io/docs/tasks/tools/install-kubectl for instructions on how to install the Kubernetes command line tool.

    For example, this installs kubectl version 1.6.1 using curl:

    Note

    The amd64 path is for both 64-bit AMD and Intel architectures.

  16. Change kubectl to enable execute permissions.
  17. Set up kubectl so that it is in the execution path.

    kubectl is installed in the home directory. The following configures a link to that executable from the /usr/local/bin directory.

  18. Verify that the Bash, Ansible, Python, and kubectl versions meet the requirements specified in Control Machine Requirements.

    For example:

You have now set up the control machine. If you have also set up the required operating system on the cluster servers, then you are ready to start proNX Optical Director software installation.

Setting Up the Control Machine in a Debian-Based Distribution (Example)

Warning

This example procedure is unsupported and is included purely for informational purposes.

This procedure uses sample commands and shows outputs that are current as of the writing of this procedure. Because these examples include the installation of third-party tools and software, the commands and outputs might change over time without notice. Be sure to consult the latest third-party documentation for the most up-to-date installation instructions and examples.

Prerequisites

  • The control machine has access to the Internet.

Use this procedure to set up the control machine using a Debian-based (Ubuntu) distribution.

There are a number of ways to set up the control machine. You can use an existing Linux installation or create a new one.

This procedure shows an example of setting up the control machine with a new Linux Ubuntu Server installation. There are many other ways to set up the control machine. Your procedure might be different. Because Linux installation can vary from release to release (even for the same Linux distribution), use this procedure as a guide only.

Note

This example assumes you are setting up a temporary control machine for the sole purpose of installing the proNX Optical Director software. As a temporary machine, you only need to select the most basic installation options. If you intend to use the control machine for other purposes, then select the options that match the requirements for those other purposes.

  1. Download the Ubuntu Server ISO from the Ubuntu download site (https://www.ubuntu.com/download). Select the Ubuntu Server option.
  2. Create a DVD or USB drive with that ISO image. You will need to use the appropriate disk imaging tool for the operating system on the machine on which you are creating the drive. You cannot simply copy the image onto the DVD or USB drive.
  3. Plug the network cable into the target control machine and ensure the machine has access to the Internet.

    The control machine must be able to reach the Internet for this procedure to download third-party software.

  4. Boot up the target control machine with the DVD or USB drive. You might need to change the BIOS boot-up sequence to boot from the DVD or USB drive before the hard drive.

    Select the Install Ubuntu Server option. This option contains the most stable version of the kernel.

  5. Follow the setup screens to set up Linux as you normally do.

    Use the Tab key to navigate between fields. Use the arrow keys to navigate to a selection within a field. Use the Space bar to select or unselect an option. Use the Enter key to activate your selections.

    • Configure the language, location, and keyboard settings.

    • If your machine has more than one network adapter, select the network adapter to use. This should be the adapter with the Ethernet cable plugged in.

    • Specify the host name you want to use.

    • Configure the user name and password.

    • Confirm your time zone. The time zone is automatically set based on your location.

    • If the control machine has existing partitions, choose the option to unmount them and then select the Guided - use entire disk partitioning option. Confirm all settings.

      Note

      This erases all data from the hard drive.

    • Choose the additional system software that you want to install. As a minimum, select standard system utilities and OpenSSH server.

  6. Reboot the machine when prompted.
  7. After the machine reboots, log in as the user you created in step 5.
  8. Update the existing packages. Debian-based distributions use the Aptitude package manager (apt) for installing and updating packages.

    If current packages are automatically downloaded as part of the OS installation process, then you do not need to run this command. However, it is always good practice to update your packages just in case.

  9. Install the software-properties-common package. Some releases might already include this package.
  10. Install Ansible.
  11. Install pip (package manager for Python).
  12. Install the Python netaddr module.
  13. Optionally, install the Kubernetes command line tool (kubectl) in the home directory. This allows you to manage the cluster servers from the control machine.

    See https://kubernetes.io/docs/tasks/tools/install-kubectl for instructions on how to install the Kubernetes command line tool.

    For example, this installs kubectl version 1.6.1 using curl:

    Note

    The amd64 path is for both 64-bit AMD and Intel architectures.

  14. Change kubectl to enable execute permissions.
  15. Set up kubectl so that it is in the execution path.

    kubectl is installed in the home directory. The following configures a link to that executable from the /usr/local/bin directory.

  16. Verify that the Bash, Ansible, Python, and kubectl versions meet the requirements specified in Control Machine Requirements.

    For example:

You have now set up the control machine. If you have also set up the required operating system on the cluster servers, then you are ready to start proNX Optical Director software installation.

Setting Up the Control Machine in Mac OS X (Example)

Warning

This example procedure is unsupported and is included purely for informational purposes.

This procedure uses sample commands and shows outputs that are current as of the writing of this procedure. Because these examples include the installation of third-party tools and software, the commands and outputs might change over time without notice. Be sure to consult the latest third-party documentation for the most up-to-date installation instructions and examples.

Prerequisites

  • The control machine has access to the Internet.

Use this procedure to set up the control machine in Mac OS X.

  1. Launch a Terminal window.
  2. Install the Homebrew package manager if your machine does not already have it installed.

    To check if Homebrew is already installed:

    If the output of this command indicates that Homebrew is ready to brew, proceed to step 3.

    Otherwise, follow the instructions at https://brew.sh to install Homebrew.

    For example:

    Note

    In some versions of Mac OS X, you might need to change the ownership of the /usr/local directory for Homebrew to install successfully (for example, sudo chown user:admin /usr/local and sudo chown -R user:admin /usr/local), where user is your username.

    Homebrew is installed in /usr/local.

  3. Install Ansible. For example:
  4. Install the Python netaddr module. For example:
    Note

    If the pip2 command is not found, use the pip install netaddr command.

  5. Install sshpass. The sshpass utility is used for non-interactive SSH login, which takes place during proNX Optical Director installation.
    1. Remove the existing sshpass.rb file if it exists. For example:

    2. Create a new sshpass.rb file. This command exits by placing you in an edit session of the new sshpass.rb file.

    3. Simply exit the edit session. For vim, type :q.

    4. Install sshpass.

  6. Optionally, install the Kubernetes command line tool (kubectl) in the home directory. This allows you to manage the cluster servers from the control machine.

    See https://kubernetes.io/docs/tasks/tools/install-kubectl for instructions on how to install the Kubernetes command line tool.

    For example, this installs kubectl version 1.6.1 using curl:

    Note

    The amd64 path is for both 64-bit AMD and Intel architectures.

  7. Verify that the Bash, Ansible, Python, and kubectl versions meet the requirements specified in Control Machine Requirements.

    For example:

You have now set up the control machine. If you have also set up the required operating system on the cluster servers, then you are ready to start proNX Optical Director software installation.