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    Bulk Statistics Data Collection Overview

    The router offers an efficient data collection and transfer facility for accounting applications. The E Series router SNMP MIBs extend the accounting data collection mechanism defined in the Accounting-Control-MIB (RFC 2513) to include support for connectionless networks.

    Service providers need reasonably accurate data about customers’ use of networks. This data is used for billing customers and must be available at a customer’s request. Accounting applications based on SNMP polling models consume significant network bandwidth because they poll large volumes of data frequently.

    Unfortunately, SNMP is not well suited for gathering large volumes of data, especially over short time intervals. It is inadequate for use by accounting applications because:

    • The SNMP PDU layout has a low payload-to-overhead ratio.
    • Processing SNMP PDUs is expensive because objects and tables need to be sorted in lexicographic order.

    The router avoids the need for continuous polling of SNMP statistics by using applications known as collectors to retrieve data. You can configure up to six collectors. The router sends collected statistics through FTP to assigned hosts, known as receivers. You must assign a primary receiver to each collector, and you can assign a secondary receiver for redundancy.

    Note: The basic-encoding-rules (BER)–encoding choice is not supported.

    You can collect interface bulk statistics based on sets of virtual router groups. If sets of virtual router groups generally correspond to ISPs, you can then forward the relevant data to a particular ISP.

    To configure a collector to include data from a specific list of virtual routers, you must first configure a collector and then associate a router set with it. A collector can have up to 64 virtual routers associated with it.

    To collect bulk statistics for a subset of all configured subinterfaces, you can define the subinterfaces using the following syntax:

    Slot/Port[.subInterfaceId]

    Per virtual router collection is supported on the if-stats and igmp schemas. It is supported on all interface types supported by BulkStats. Collectors modified to use per virtual router collection or configured after a collector has started have a time delay (up to the configured time in seconds) until an active collector starts again.

    The maximum number of interfaces for each type of interface and line module can differ. Bulk statistics can collect these statistics when you configure the slots with their respective interfaces to the corresponding maximum values. For information about maximum values see JunosE Release Notes, Appendix A, System Maximums.

    Note: Define all interface types before you map a collector to the if-stats schema to ensure that you display statistics for all configured interfaces in the first interval.

    The name of the bulk statistics file that is transferred to the host when there is a collectorSequence attribute in the remote name is as follows:

    fileName - z - mmddHHMM - s. sts

    where:

    • fileName—Name of the file, which includes sysName, sysUpTime, depending on the attributes specified
    • -z—Receiver index value
    • mmddHHMM—Timestamp when the receiver is created in month/day/hour/minute format
    • -s—Actual sequence number

    This section describes the following:

    Interface Strings

    Bulk statistics provides interface strings as described in Table 1.

    Table 1: Interface Strings

    Type of Interface

    Common Description Format-Mode Disabled

    Common Description Format-Mode Enabled

    IP interfaces

    IP

    Ip

    PPP interfaces

    PPP

    Ppp

    DS0 interfaces

    Ds0

    Ds0

    DS1 interfaces

    SERIAL

    Ds1

    DS3 interfaces

    SERIAL

    Ds3

    Frame Relay Major interfaces

    FR

    FrameRelayMajor

    Ethernet interfaces

    ENET

    Ethernet

    Sonet interfaces

    SONET

    Sonet

    Sonet Path interfaces

    SONET

    SonetPath

    ATM interfaces

    ATM

    Atm

    ATM AAL5 interfaces

    ATM

    AtmAal5

    ATM 1483 interfaces

    ATM

    Atm1483

    Ft1 interfaces

    SERIAL

    Ft1

    HDLC interfaces

    HDLCIntf

    HDLC

    IpLoopback interfaces

    Loopback

    IpLoopback

    IpVirtual interfaces

    IpVirtual

    IpVirtual

    Frame Relay Sub interfaces

    FR

    FrameRelaySub

    PppOE Major interfaces

    PPPoE

    PppoeMajor

    PppOE Sub interfaces

    PPPoE

    PppoeSub

    Bridged Ethernet

    BRG-ET

    BridgedEthernet

    L2TP Tunnel

    L2TP

    L2tpTunnel

    L2TP Session

    L2TP

    L2tpSession

    PppLink interfaces

    MLPPP

    PppLink

    HDLC interfaces

    HDLCEncaps

    Hdlc

    L2TP Destination

    L2TP

    L2tpDestination

    MPLS Major interfaces

    MplsIfMajor

    MplsMajor

    MPLS Minor interfaces

    MplsIfMinor

    MplsMinor

    Ppp Network interfaces

    MLPPP

    PppNetwork

    Ethernet Sub interfaces

    ENET

    EthernetSub

    MultiLink Frame Relay interfaces

    MLFR

    MultilinkFrameRelay

    Ip Tunnel Interfaces

    IP-TUNNEL

    IpTunnel

    Server Port Interfaces

    ServerPort

    ServerPort

    Sonet VT interfaces

    SONET

    SonetVT

    Vlan major interfaces

    VLAN-MAJ

    VlanMajor

    Vlan sub interfaces

    VLAN-SUB

    VlanSub

    Gtp interfaces

    Gtp

    Gtp

    L2fTunnel interfaces

    L2fTunnel

    L2fTunnel

    L2fSession interfaces

    L2fSession

    L2fSession

    L2fDestination interfaces

    L2fDestination

    L2fDestination

    IpSec Tunnel interfaces

    IpSecTunnel

    IpsecTunnel

    Sg interfaces

    SgInterface

    SgInterface

    MPLS L2 Shim interfaces

    MplsL2Shim

    MplsL2Shim

    MPLS VC Sub interfaces

    MplsL3Shim

    MplsVcSub

    LacGen interfaces

    LacGen

    LacGen

    Bridge interfaces

    BridgeIf

    Bridge

    IpSec Transport interfaces

    IPsecTransportIf

    IpsecTransport

    IPv6 interfaces

    IPv6If

    Ipv6

    IPv6 Tunnel interfaces

    IPv6TunnelIf

    Ipv6Tunnel

    IPv6 loopback interfaces

    IPv6LoopbackIf

    Ipv6Loopback

    OSI interfaces

    Osi

    Osi

    LAG interfaces

    Lag

    Lag

    Ip Tunnel MDT interfaces

    IpTunnelMdt

    IpTunnelMdt

    Understanding Counter Discontinuity

    Interface counter discontinuity can occur when a counter wraps or after a line module is reloaded or reset. If one of these actions occurs, applications that utilize the counters in expressions or calculations generate erroneous values and misleading graphs.

    Because counters are 64 bits long, the possibility of a counter’s wrapping naturally would occur so infrequently (for example, in many hundreds of years) that this scenario is not recognized as an issue.

    Counter discontinuity does occur, however, when you reload or reset a line module. To indicate reloading or resetting, bulk statistics files contain a record similar to the following:

    {Controller down slot 3, TUE OCT 29 2004 14:25:10.370 UTC}

    This record provides a mechanism by which applications can detect discontinuity events. To take advantage of this detection capability, the bulk statistics parsing entity should use the record to terminate expression or formula calculations for the indicated slot and to establish a new baseline.

    Published: 2014-08-12