Tunnel-Service and IPsec-Service Overview

Tunnels provide a way of transporting datagrams between routers that do not support the same protocols. Often, these routers are separated by networks.

To configure tunneling, you must identify the tunnel-server ports that reside on modules that support tunnel services. You can then assign the tunnel-service interfaces that encapsulate protocols and enable them to be tunneled across the network.

Figure 13 displays the interface stacking for tunnel-service interfaces on a tunnel-server module.

Figure 13: Interface Stacking for Tunnel-Service Interfaces

Interface Stacking for Tunnel-Service
Interfaces

This section describes the types of tunnel-server ports that you can configure on tunnel-server modules and the types of tunnel-service interfaces that you can run on these ports.

Types of Tunnel-Server Ports

E Series routers support two types of tunnel-server ports: dedicated tunnel-server ports and shared tunnel-server ports.

Dedicated Tunnel-Server Ports

Dedicated tunnel-server ports are virtual ports that are always present on dedicated tunnel-server modules. These modules offer only tunnel services; they do not offer access services.

Shared Tunnel-Server Ports

Sharedtunnel-server ports are virtual ports that are always present on certain E Series line modules that provide tunnel services in addition to regular access services. You can configure the shared tunnel-server port to use a portion of the module’s bandwidth to provide tunnel services.

Shared tunnel-server ports offer the following benefits:

Types of Tunnel-Service Interfaces

You can configure the following types of tunnel-service interfaces using dedicated tunnel-server ports and shared tunnel-server ports:

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