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Router Interfaces Overview

 

The interfaces on a router provide network connectivity to the router. This topic discusses about the various router interfaces supported on Junos like, transient interfaces, services interfaces, container interfaces, and internal ethernet interfaces. This topic also provides basic interface related information like, interface naming conventions, overview of interface encapsulation, and overview of interface descriptors.

Router Interfaces Overview

Routers typically contain several different types of interfaces suited to various functions. For the interfaces on a router to function, you must configure them. Specify the interface location (that is, the slot where the Flexible PIC Concentrator [FPC], Dense Port Concentrator [DPC], or Modular Port Concentrator [MPC] is installed. You must also specify the location of the Physical Interface Card [PIC] or Modular Interface Card [MIC] , and the interface type, for example, SONET/SDH, Asynchronous Transfer Mode [ATM], or Ethernet). Finally, you must specify the encapsulation type and any interface-specific properties that may apply.

You can configure interfaces that are currently present in the router, as well as interfaces that are not currently present but that are expected to be added in the future. Junos OS detects the interface once the hardware has been installed and applies the pre-set configuration to it.

To see which interfaces are currently installed in the router, issue the show interfaces terse operational mode command. If an interface is listed in the output, it is physically installed in the router. If an interface is not listed in the output, it is not installed in the router.

For information about which interfaces are supported on your router, see your router’s Interface Module Reference.

You can configure Junos OS class-of-service (CoS) properties to provide a variety of classes of service for different applications, including multiple forwarding classes for managing packet transmission, congestion management, and CoS-based forwarding. For more information about configuring CoS properties, see the Class of Service User Guide (Routers and EX9200 Switches).

Types of Interfaces

Interfaces can be permanent or transient, and are used for networking or services:

  • Permanent interfaces—Interfaces that are always present in the router.

    Permanent interfaces in the router consist of management Ethernet interfaces and internal Ethernet interfaces, which are described separately in the following topics:

  • Transient interfaces—Interfaces that can be inserted into or removed from the router depending on your network configuration needs.

  • Networking interfaces—Interfaces, such as Ethernet or SONET/SDH interfaces, that primarily provide traffic connectivity.

  • Services interfaces—Interfaces that provide specific capabilities for manipulating traffic before it is delivered to its destination.

  • Container interfaces—Interfaces that support automatic protection switching (APS) on physical SONET links using a virtual container infrastructure.

Junos OS internally generates nonconfigurable interfaces which are described in Interfaces Command Reference and Services Interfaces.

Interface Naming Overview

Each interface has an interface name, which specifies the media type, the slot in which the FPC or DPC is located, the location on the FPC where the PIC is installed, and the PIC or DPC port. The interface name uniquely identifies an individual network connector in the system. You use the interface name when configuring interfaces and when enabling various functions and properties, such as routing protocols, on individual interfaces. The system uses the interface name when displaying information about the interface, for example, in the show interfaces command.

The interface name is represented by a physical part, a channel part, and a logical part in the following format:

The channel part of the name is optional for all interfaces except channelized DS3, E1, OC12, and STM1 interfaces.

The EX Series, QFX Series, NFX Series, OCX1100, QFabric System, and EX4600 devices use a naming convention for defining the interfaces that are similar to that of other platforms running under Juniper Networks Junos OS. For more information, see Understanding Interface Naming Conventions.

The following sections provide interface naming configuration guidelines:

Physical Part of an Interface Name

The physical part of an interface name identifies the physical device, which corresponds to a single physical network connector.

Note

The internal interface is dependent on the Routing Engine. To identify if the Routing Engine is using this type of interface, use the following command:

show interfaces terse

user@host> show interfaces terse

For more information on the Routing Engines that each chassis supports, the first supported release for the Routing Engine in the specified chassis, the management Ethernet interface, and the internal Ethernet interfaces for each Routing Engine, please refer the link titled Supported Routing Engines by Chassis under Related Documentation section.

This part of the interface name has the following format:

type is the media type, which identifies the network device that can be one of the following:

  • ae—Aggregated Ethernet interface. This is a virtual aggregated link and has a different naming format from most PICs; for more information, see Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces Overview.

  • as—Aggregated SONET/SDH interface. This is a virtual aggregated link and has a different naming format from most PICs; for more information, see Configuring Aggregated SONET/SDH Interfaces.

  • at—ATM1 or ATM2 intelligent queuing (IQ) interface or a virtual ATM interface on a circuit emulation (CE) interface.

  • bcm—The bcm0 internal Ethernet process is supported on specific Routing engines for various M series and T series routers. For more information please refer the link titled Supported Routing Engines by Chassis under Related Documentation section.

  • cau4—Channelized AU-4 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized STM1 IQ or IQE PIC or Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE PICs).

  • ce1—Channelized E1 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized E1 IQ PIC or Channelized STM1 IQ or IQE PIC).

  • ci—Container interface.

  • coc1—Channelized OC1 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE or Channelized OC3 IQ and IQE PICs).

  • coc3—Channelized OC3 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized OC3 IQ and IQE PICs).

  • coc12—Channelized OC12 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE PICs).

  • coc48—Channelized OC48 interface (configured on the Channelized OC48 and Channelized OC48 IQE PICs).

  • cp—Collector interface (configured on the Monitoring Services II PIC).

  • cstm1—Channelized STM1 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized STM1 IQ or IQE PIC).

  • cstm4—Channelized STM4 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE PICs).

  • cstm16—Channelized STM16 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized OC48/STM16 and Channelized OC48/STM16 IQE PICs).

  • ct1—Channelized T1 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized DS3 IQ and IQE PICs, Channelized OC3 IQ and IQE PICs, Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE PICs, or Channelized T1 IQ PIC).

  • ct3—Channelized T3 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized DS3 IQ and IQE PICs, Channelized OC3 IQ and IQE PICs, or Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE PICs).

  • demux—Interface that supports logical IP interfaces that use the IP source or destination address to demultiplex received packets. Only one demux interface (demux0) exists per chassis. All demux logical interfaces must be associated with an underlying logical interface.

  • dfc—Interface that supports dynamic flow capture processing on T Series or M320 routers containing one or more Monitoring Services III PICs. Dynamic flow capture enables you to capture packet flows on the basis of dynamic filtering criteria. Specifically, you can use this feature to forward passively monitored packet flows that match a particular filter list to one or more destinations using an on-demand control protocol.

  • ds—DS0 interface (configured on the Multichannel DS3 PIC, Channelized E1 PIC, Channelized OC3 IQ and IQE PICs, Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE PICs, Channelized DS3 IQ and IQE PICs, Channelized E1 IQ PIC, Channelized STM1 IQ or IQE PIC, or Channelized T1 IQ).

  • dsc—Discard interface.

  • e1—E1 interface (including channelized STM1-to-E1 interfaces).

  • e3—E3 interface (including E3 IQ interfaces).

  • em—Management and internal Ethernet interfaces. For M Series routers, MX Series routers, T Series routers, and TX Series routers, you can use the show chassis hardware command to display hardware information about the router, including its Routing Engine model. To determine which management interface is supported on your router and Routing Engine combination, see Understanding Management Ethernet Interfaces and Supported Routing Engines by Router.

  • es—Encryption interface.

  • et—100-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces (10, 40, and 100-Gigabit Ethernet interface for PTX Series Packet Transport Routers only).

  • fe—Fast Ethernet interface.

  • fxp—Management and internal Ethernet interfaces. For M Series routers, MX Series routers, T Series routers, and TX Series routers, you can use the show chassis hardware command to display hardware information about the router, including its Routing Engine model. To determine which management interface is supported on your router and Routing Engine combination, see Understanding Management Ethernet Interfaces and Supported Routing Engines by Router.

  • ge—Gigabit Ethernet interface.

    Note
    • The XENPAK 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface PIC, which is supported only on M series routers, is configured using the ge interface naming convention instead of the xe interface naming convention. Refer the following show commands for more information:

      show chassis hardware

      user@host> show chassis hardware

      show configuration interfaces

      user@host> show configuration interfaces ge-4/0/0
    • In MX and SRX series devices, the 1 and 10-Gigabit SFP or SFP+ optical interfaces are always named as xe even if a 1-Gigabit SFP is inserted. However, in EX and QFX series devices, the interface name is shown as ge or xe based on the speed of the optical device inserted.

  • gr—Generic routing encapsulation (GRE) tunnel interface.

  • gre—Internally generated interface that is configurable only as the control channel for Generalized MPLS (GMPLS). For more information about GMPLS, see the MPLS Applications User Guide.

    Note

    You can configure GRE interfaces (gre-x/y/z) only for GMPLS control channels. GRE interfaces are not supported or configurable for other applications..

  • ip—IP-over-IP encapsulation tunnel interface.

  • ipip—Internally generated interface that is not configurable.

  • ixgbe—The internal Ethernet process ixgbe0 and ixgbe1 are used by the RE-DUO-C2600-16G Routing Engine, which is supported on TX Matrix Plus and PTX5000.

  • iw—Logical interfaces associated with the endpoints of Layer 2 circuit and Layer 2 VPN connections (pseudowire stitching Layer 2 VPNs). For more information about VPNs, see the Junos OS VPNs Library for Routing Devices.

  • lc—Internally generated interface that is not configurable.

  • lo—Loopback interface. The Junos OS automatically configures one loopback interface (lo0). The logical interface lo0.16383 is a nonconfigurable interface for router control traffic.

  • ls—Link services interface.

  • lsi—Internally generated interface that is not configurable.

  • ml—Multilink interface (including Multilink Frame Relay and MLPPP).

  • mo—Monitoring services interface (including monitoring services and monitoring services II). The logical interface mo-fpc/pic/port.16383 is an internally generated, nonconfigurable interface for router control traffic.

  • ms—Multiservices interface.

  • mt—Multicast tunnel interface (internal router interface for VPNs). If your router has a Tunnel PIC, the Junos OS automatically configures one multicast tunnel interface (mt) for each virtual private network (VPN) you configure. Although it is not necessary to configure multicast interfaces, you can use the multicast-only statement to configure the unit and family so that the tunnel can transmit and receive multicast traffic only. For more information, see multicast-only.

  • mtun—Internally generated interface that is not configurable.

  • oc3—OC3 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE PICs or Channelized OC3 IQ and IQE PICs).

  • pd—Interface on the rendezvous point (RP) that de-encapsulates packets.

  • pe—Interface on the first-hop PIM router that encapsulates packets destined for the RP router.

  • pimd—Internally generated interface that is not configurable.

  • pime—Internally generated interface that is not configurable.

  • rlsq—Container interface, numbered from 0 through 127, used to tie the primary and secondary LSQ PICs together in high availability configurations. Any failure of the primary PIC results in a switch to the secondary PIC and vice versa.

  • rms—Redundant interface for two multiservices interfaces.

  • rsp—Redundant virtual interface for the adaptive services interface.

  • se—Serial interface (including EIA-530, V.35, and X.21 interfaces).

  • si—Services-inline interface, which is hosted on a Trio-based line card.

  • so—SONET/SDH interface.

  • sp—Adaptive services interface. The logical interface sp-fpc/pic/port.16383 is an internally generated, nonconfigurable interface for router control traffic.

  • stm1—STM1 interface (configured on the OC3/STM1 interfaces).

  • stm4—STM4 interface (configured on the OC12/STM4 interfaces).

  • stm16—STM16 interface (configured on the OC48/STM16 interfaces).

  • t1—T1 interface (including channelized DS3-to-DS1 interfaces).

  • t3—T3 interface (including channelized OC12-to-DS3 interfaces).

  • tap—Internally generated interface that is not configurable.

  • umd—USB modem interface.

  • vsp—Voice services interface.

  • vc4—Virtually concatenated interface.

  • vt—Virtual loopback tunnel interface.

  • xe—10-Gigabit Ethernet interface. Some older 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces use the ge media type (rather than xe) to identify the physical part of the network device.

  • xt—Logical interface for Protected System Domains to establish a Layer 2 tunnel connection.

fpc identifies the number of the FPC or DPC card on which the physical interface is located. Specifically, it is the number of the slot in which the card is installed.

M40, M40e, M160, M320, M120, T320, T640, and T1600 routers each have eight FPC slots that are numbered 0 through 7, from left to right as you are facing the front of the chassis. For information about compatible FPCs and PICs, see the hardware guide for your router.

On PTX1000 routers, the FPC number is always 0.

The M20 router has four FPC slots that are numbered 0 through 3, from top to bottom as you are facing the front of the chassis. The slot number is printed adjacent to each slot.

MX Series routers support DPCs, FPCs, and Modular Interface Cards (MICs). For information about compatible DPCs, FPCs, PICs, and MICs, see the MX Series Interface Module Reference.

For M5, M7i, M10, and M10i routers, the FPCs are built into the chassis; you install the PICs into the chassis.

The M5 and M7i routers have space for up to four PICs. The M7i router also comes with an integrated Tunnel PIC, or an optional integrated AS PIC, or an optional integrated MS PIC.

The M10 and M10i routers have space for up to eight PICs.

A routing matrix can have up to 32 FPCs (numbered 0 through 31).

For more information about interface naming for a routing matrix, see Interface Naming for a Routing Matrix Based on a TX Matrix Router.

pic identifies the number of the PIC on which the physical interface is located. Specifically, it is the number of the PIC location on the FPC. FPCs with four PIC slots are numbered 0 through 3. FPCs with three PIC slots are numbered 0 through 2. The PIC location is printed on the FPC carrier board. For PICs that occupy more than one PIC slot, the lower PIC slot number identifies the PIC location.

port identifies a specific port on a PIC or DPC. The number of ports varies depending on the PIC. The port numbers are printed on the PIC.

Logical Part of an Interface Name

The logical unit part of the interface name corresponds to the logical unit number. The range of number available varies for different interface types. See unit for current range values.

In the virtual part of the name, a period (.) separates the port and logical unit numbers:

  • Other platforms:

Separators in an Interface Name

There is a separator between each element of an interface name.

In the physical part of the name, a hyphen (-) separates the media type from the FPC number, and a slash (/) separates the FPC, PIC, and port numbers.

In the virtual part of the name, a period (.) separates the channel and logical unit numbers.

A colon (:) separates the physical and virtual parts of the interface name.

Channel Part of an Interface Name

The channel identifier part of the interface name is required only on channelized interfaces. For channelized interfaces, channel 0 identifies the first channelized interface. For channelized IQ and channelized IQE interfaces, channel 1 identifies the first channelized interface. A nonconcatenated (that is, channelized) SONET/SDH OC48 interface has four OC12 channels, numbered 0 through 3.

To determine which types of channelized PICs are currently installed in the router, use the show chassis hardware command from the top level of the command-line interface (CLI). Channelized IQ and IQE PICs are listed in the output with “intelligent queuing IQ” or “enhanced intelligent queuing IQE” in the description. For more information, see Channelized Interfaces Overview.

For ISDN interfaces, you specify the B-channel in the form bc-pim/0/port:n. n is the B-channel ID and can be 1 or 2. You specify the D-channel in the form dc-pim/0/port:0.

Note

For ISDN, the B-channel and D-channel interfaces do not have any configurable parameters. However, when interface statistics are displayed, B-channel and D-channel interfaces have statistical values.

Note

In the Junos OS implementation, the term logical interfaces generally refers to interfaces you configure by including the unit statement at the [edit interfaces interface-name] hierarchy level. Logical interfaces have the .logical descriptor at the end of the interface name, as in ge-0/0/0.1 or t1-0/0/0:0.1, where the logical unit number is 1.

Although channelized interfaces are generally thought of as logical or virtual, the Junos OS sees T3, T1, and NxDS0 interfaces within a channelized IQ or IQE PIC as physical interfaces. For example, both t3-0/0/0 and t3-0/0/0:1 are treated as physical interfaces by the Junos OS. In contrast, t3-0/0/0.2 and t3-0/0/0:1.2 are considered logical interfaces because they have the .2 at the end of the interface names.

Interface Naming for a Routing Matrix Based on a TX Matrix Router

A routing matrix based on a Juniper Networks TX Matrix router is a multichassis architecture composed of one TX Matrix router and from one to four interconnected T640 routers. From the perspective of the user interface, the routing matrix appears as a single router. The TX Matrix router controls all the T640 routers, as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Routing Matrix
Routing Matrix

A TX Matrix router is also referred to as a switch-card chassis (SCC). The CLI uses scc to refer to the TX Matrix router. A T640 router in a routing matrix is also referred to as a line-card chassis (LCC). The CLI uses lcc as a prefix to refer to a specific T640 router.

LCCs are assigned numbers 0 through 3, depending on the hardware setup and connectivity to the TX Matrix router. For more information, see the TX Matrix Router Hardware Guide. A routing matrix can have up to four T640 routers, and each T640 router has up to eight FPCs. Therefore, the routing matrix as a whole can have up to 32 FPCs (0 through 31).

In the Junos OS CLI, an interface name has the following format:

When you specify the fpc number for a T640 router in a routing matrix, the Junos OS determines which T640 router contains the specified FPC based on the following assignment:

  • On LCC 0, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 0 through 7.

  • On LCC 1, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 8 through 15.

  • On LCC 2, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 16 through 23.

  • On LCC 3, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 24 through 31.

For example, the 1 in se-1/0/0 refers to FPC hardware slot 1 on the T640 router labeled lcc0. The 11 in t1-11/2/0 refers to FPC hardware slot 3 on the T640 router labeled lcc1. The 20 in so-20/0/1 refers to FPC hardware slot 4 on the T640 router labeled lcc2. The 31 in t3-31/1/0 refers to FPC hardware slot 7 on the T640 router labeled lcc3.

Table 1 summarizes the FPC numbering for a T640 router in a routing matrix.

Table 1: FPC Numbering for T640 Routers in a Routing Matrix

LCC Numbers Assigned to the T640 Router

Configuration Numbers

0

0 through 7

1

8 through 15

2

16 through 23

3

24 through 31

Table 2 lists each FPC hardware slot and the corresponding configuration numbers for LCCs 0 through 3.

Table 2: One-to-One FPC Numbering for T640 Routers in a Routing Matrix

FPC Numbering

T640 Routers

 

LCC 0
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

LCC 1
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

LCC 2
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

LCC 3
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Interface Naming for a Routing Matrix Based on a TX Matrix Plus Router

A routing matrix based on a Juniper Networks TX Matrix Plus Router is a multichassis architecture composed of one TX Matrix Plus router and from one to four interconnected T1600 routers. From the perspective of the user interface, the routing matrix appears as a single router. The TX Matrix Plus router controls all the T1600 routers, as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2: Routing Matrix Based on a TX Matrix Plus Router
Routing Matrix
Based on a TX Matrix Plus Router

A TX Matrix Plus router is also referred to as a switch-fabric chassis (SFC). The CLI uses sfc to refer to the TX Matrix Plus router. A T1600 router in a routing matrix is also referred to as a line-card chassis (LCC). The CLI uses lcc as a prefix to refer to a specific T1600 router.

LCCs are assigned numbers, 0 through 3, depending on the hardware setup and connectivity to the TX Matrix Plus router. For more information, see the TX Matrix Plus Router Hardware Guide. A routing matrix based on a TX Matrix Plus router can have up to four T1600 routers, and each T1600 router has up to eight FPCs. Therefore, the routing matrix as a whole can have up to 32 FPCs (0 through 31).

In the Junos OS CLI, an interface name has the following format:

When you specify the fpc number for a T1600 router in a routing matrix, the Junos OS determines which T1600 router contains the specified FPC based on the following assignment:

  • On LCC 0, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 0 through 7.

  • On LCC 1, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 8 through 15.

  • On LCC 2, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 16 through 23.

  • On LCC 3, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 24 through 31.

For example, the 1 in se-1/0/0 refers to FPC hardware slot 1 on the T1600 router labeled lcc0. The 11 in t1-11/2/0 refers to FPC hardware slot 3 on the T1600 router labeled lcc1. The 20 in so-20/0/1 refers to FPC hardware slot 4 on the T1600 router labeled lcc2. The 31 in t3-31/1/0 refers to FPC hardware slot 7 on the T1600 router labeled lcc3.

Table 3 summarizes the FPC numbering for a routing matrix based on a TX Matrix Plus router.

Table 3: FPC Numbering for T1600 Routers in a Routing Matrix

LCC Numbers Assigned to the T1600 Router

Configuration Numbers

0

0 through 7

1

8 through 15

2

16 through 23

3

24 through 31

Table 4 lists each FPC hardware slot and the corresponding configuration numbers for LCCs 0 through 3.

Table 4: One-to-One FPC Numbering for T1600 Routers in a Routing Matrix

FPC Numbering

T1600 Routers

 

LCC 0
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

LCC 1
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

LCC 2
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

LCC 3
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Chassis Interface Naming

You configure some PIC properties, such as framing, at the [edit chassis] hierarchy level. Chassis interface naming varies depending on the routing hardware.

  • To configure PIC properties for a standalone router, you must specify the FPC and PIC numbers, as follows:

  • To configure PIC properties for a T640 or T1600 router configured in a routing matrix, you must specify the LCC, FPC, and PIC numbers, as follows:

    For the FPC slot in a T640 router in a routing matrix, specify the actual hardware slot number, as labeled on the T640 router chassis. Do not use the corresponding software FPC configuration numbers shown in Table 2.

    For the FPC slot in a T1600 router in a routing matrix, specify the actual hardware slot number, as labeled on the T1600 router chassis. Do not use the corresponding software FPC configuration numbers shown in Table 3.

For more information about the [edit chassis] hierarchy, see the Junos OS Administration Library.

Examples: Interface Naming

This section provides examples of naming interfaces. For an illustration of where slots, PICs, and ports are located, see Figure 3.

Figure 3: Interface Slot, PIC, and Port Locations
Interface Slot, PIC, and Port Locations

For an FPC in slot 1 with two OC3 SONET/SDH PICs in PIC positions 0 and 1, each PIC with two ports uses the following names:

An OC48 SONET/SDH PIC in slot 1 and in concatenated mode appears as a single FPC with a single PIC, which has a single port. If this interface has a single logical unit, it has the following name:

An OC48 SONET/SDH PIC in slot 1 and in channelized mode has a number for each channel. For example:

For an FPC in slot 1 with a Channelized OC12 PIC in PIC position 2, the DS3 channels have the following names:

For an FPC in slot 1 with four OC12 ATM PICs (the FPC is fully populated), the four PICs, each with a single port and a single logical unit, have the following names:

In a routing matrix on the T640 router labeled lcc1, for an FPC in slot 5 with four SONET OC192 PICs, the four PICs, each with a single port and a single logical unit, have the following names:

For an FPC in slot 1 with one 4-port ISDN BRI interface card, port 4 has the following name:

The first B-channel, the second B-channel, and the control channel have the following names:

Interface Descriptors Overview

When you configure an interface, you are effectively specifying the properties for a physical interface descriptor. In most cases, the physical interface descriptor corresponds to a single physical device and consists of the following parts:

  • The interface name, which defines the media type

  • The slot in which the FPC or DPC is located

  • The location on the FPC in which the PIC is installed

  • The PIC or DPC port

  • The interface’s channel and logical unit numbers (optional)

Each physical interface descriptor can contain one or more logical interface descriptors. These allow you to map one or more logical (or virtual) interfaces to a single physical device. Creating multiple logical interfaces is useful for ATM, Frame Relay, and Gigabit Ethernet networks, in which you can associate multiple virtual circuits, data-link connections, or virtual LANs (VLANs) with a single interface device.

Each logical interface descriptor can have one or more family descriptors to define the protocol family that is associated with and allowed to run over the logical interface.

The following protocol families are supported:

  • Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) suite (inet)

  • Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) suite (inet6)

  • Circuit cross-connect (CCC)

  • Translational cross-connect (TCC)

  • International Organization for Standardization (ISO)

  • Multilink Frame Relay end-to-end (MLFR end-to-end)

  • Multilink Frame Relay user-to-network interface network-to-network interface (MLFR UNI NNI)

  • Multilink Point-to-Point Protocol (MLPPP)

  • Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS)

  • Trivial Network Protocol (TNP)

  • (M Series, T Series, and MX Series routers only) Virtual private LAN service (VPLS)

Finally, each family descriptor can have one or more address entries, which associate a network address with a logical interface and hence with the physical interface.

You configure the various interface descriptors as follows:

  • You configure the physical interface descriptor by including the interfaces interface-name statement.

  • You configure the logical interface descriptor by including the unit statement within the interfaces interface-name statement or by including the .logical descriptor at the end of the interface name, as in t3-0/0/0.1, where the logical unit number is 1, as shown in the following examples:

  • You configure the family descriptor by including the family statement within the unit statement.

  • You configure address entries by including the address statement within the family statement.

  • You configure tunnels by including the tunnel statement within the unit statement.

Note

The address of a logical interface cannot be the same as a tunnel interface’s source or destination address. If you try to configure a logical interface with a tunnel interface’s address or vice versa, a commit failure will occur.

Physical Part of an Interface Name

Interface Names for ACX Series Universal Metro Routers

ACX Series routers do not have actual PIC devices. Instead they have built-in network ports on the front panel of the router. These ports are named using the same naming convention used for routers with PIC devices with the understanding that the FPC, PIC and port are pseudo devices. When you display information about one of these ports, you specify the interface type, the slot for the Flexible PIC Concentrator (FPC), the slot on the FPC for the Physical Interface Card (PIC), and the configured port number.

In the physical part of the interface name, a hyphen (-) separates the media type from the FPC number, and a slash (/) separates the FPC, PIC, and port numbers:

Interface Names for M Series and T Series Routers

On M Series and T Series routers, when you display information about an interface, you specify the interface type, the slot in which the Flexible PIC Concentrator (FPC) is installed, the slot on the FPC in which the Physical Interface Card (PIC) is located, and the configured port number.

In the physical part of the interface name, a hyphen (-) separates the media type from the FPC number, and a slash (/) separates the FPC, PIC, and port numbers:

Note

Exceptions to the type-fpc/pic/port physical description include the aggregated Ethernet and aggregated SONET/SDH interfaces, which use the syntax ae number and as number, respectively.

MX Series Router Interface Names

On MX Series routers when you display information about an interface, you specify the interface type, the Dense Port Concentrator (DPC), Flexible PIC Concentrator (FPC), or Modular Port Concentrator (MPC) slot, the PIC or MIC slot, and the configured port number.

Note

Although the MX Series routers use DPCs, FPCs, MPCs, MICs, and PICs, command syntax in this book is shown as fpc/pic/port for simplicity.

In the physical part of the interface name, a hyphen (-) separates the media type from the FPC number, and a slash (/) separates the DPC, FPC or MPC, MIC or PIC, and port numbers:

  • fpc—Slot in which the DPC, FPC, or MPC is installed.

  • pic—Slot on the FPC in which the PIC is located.

    For DPCs, MICs, and the 16-port MPC, the PIC value is a logical grouping of ports and varies on different platforms.

  • port—Port number on the DPC, PIC, MPC, or MIC.

Interface Names for PTX Series Routers

On PTX Series Packet Transport Routers, when you display information about an interface, you specify the interface type, the slot in which the Flexible PIC Concentrator (FPC) is installed, the slot on the FPC in which the Physical Interface Card (PIC) is located, and the configured port number.

Note
  • The PTX router supports Ethernet type interfaces only. The media type portion of the physical interface name,type supports the Ethernet interface type only: et.

  • In the CLI, all PTX3000 PICs are represented as pic0. For more information, see PTX3000 PIC Description

In the physical part of the interface name, a hyphen (-) separates the media type (et) from the FPC number, and a slash (/) separates the FPC, PIC, and port numbers:

Displaying Interface Configurations

To display a configuration, use either the show command in configuration mode or the show configuration top-level command. Interfaces are listed in numerical order, from lowest to highest slot number, then from lowest to highest PIC number, and finally from lowest to highest port number.

Interface Encapsulations Overview

Table 5 lists encapsulation support by interface type.

Table 5: Encapsulation Support by Interface Type

Interface Type

Physical Interface Encapsulation

Logical Interface Encapsulation

ae—Aggregated Ethernet interface

ethernet-ccc—Ethernet cross-connect

extended-vlan-ccc—Nonstandard TPID tagging for a cross-connect

extended-vlan-vpls—Extended VLAN virtual private LAN service

flexible-ethernet-services—Allows per-unit Ethernet encapsulation configuration

vlan-ccc—802.1Q tagging for a cross-connect

ethernet-vpls—Ethernet virtual private LAN service

vlan-vpls—VLAN virtual private LAN service

 

dix—Ethernet DIXv2 (RFC 894)

vlan-ccc—802.1Q tagging for a cross-connect

 

as—Aggregated SONET/SDH interface

cisco-hdlc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing

ppp—Serial PPP device

NA

at—ATM1 interface

atm-ccc-cell-relay—ATM cell relay encapsulation for a cross-connect

atm-pvc—ATM permanent virtual circuits

ethernet-over-atm—Ethernet over ATM encapsulation

atm-ccc-cell-relay—ATM cell relay for CCC

atm-ccc-vc-mux—ATM VC for CCC

atm-cisco-nlpid—Cisco-compatible ATM NLPID encapsulation

atm-nlpid—ATM NLPID encapsulation

atm-snap—ATM LLC/SNAP encapsulation

atm-tcc-snap—ATM LLC/SNAP for a translational cross-connect

atm-tcc-vc-mux—ATM VC for a translational cross-connect

atm-vc-mux—ATM VC multiplexing

ether-over-atm-llc—Ethernet over ATM (LLC/SNAP) encapsulation

at—ATM2 intelligent queuing (IQ) interface

atm-ccc-cell-relay—ATM cell relay encapsulation for a cross-connect

atm-pvc—ATM permanent virtual circuits

ethernet-over-atm—Ethernet over ATM encapsulation

atm-ccc-cell-relay—ATM cell relay for CCC

atm-ccc-vc-mux—ATM VC for CCC

atm-cisco-nlpid—Cisco-compatible ATM NLPID encapsulation

atm-mlppp-llc—ATM MLPPP over AAL5/LLC

atm-nlpid—ATM NLPID encapsulation

atm-ppp-llc—ATM PPP over AAL5/LLC

atm-ppp-vc-mux—ATM PPP over raw AAL5

atm-snap—ATM LLC/SNAP encapsulation

atm-tcc-snap—ATM LLC/SNAP for a translational cross-connect

atm-tcc-vc-mux—ATM VC for a translational cross-connect

atm-vc-mux—ATM VC multiplexing

ether-over-atm-llc—Ethernet over ATM (LLC/SNAP) encapsulation

ether-vpls-over-atm-llc—Ethernet VPLS over ATM (bridging) encapsulation

bcm—Gigabit Ethernet internal interfaces

NA

NA

br—Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) interface

NA

NA

ci—Container interface

cisco-hdlc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing

ppp—Serial PPP device

aps—SONET interface required for APS configuration.

ds—DS0 interface

cisco-hdlc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing

cisco-hdlc-ccc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing for a cross-connect

cisco-hdlc-tcc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing for a translational cross-connect

extended-frame-relay-ccc—Any Frame Relay DLCI for a cross-connect

extended-frame-relay-tcc—Any Frame Relay DLCI for a translational cross-connect

flexible-frame-relay—Multiple Frame Relay encapsulations

frame-relay—Frame Relay encapsulation

frame-relay-ccc—Frame Relay for a cross-connect

frame-relay-port-ccc—Frame Relay port encapsulation for a cross-connect

frame-relay-tcc—Frame Relay for a translational cross-connect

multilink-frame-relay-uni-nni—Multilink Frame Relay UNI NNI (FRF.16) encapsulation

ppp—Serial PPP device

ppp-ccc—Serial PPP device for a cross-connect

ppp-tcc—Serial PPP device for a translational cross-connect

frame-relay-ccc—Frame Relay DLCI for CCC

frame-relay-ppp—PPP over Frame Relay

frame-relay-tcc—Frame Relay DLCI for a translational cross-connect

dsc—Discard interface

NA

NA

e1—E1 interface (including channelized STM1-to-E1 interfaces)

cisco-hdlc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing

cisco-hdlc-ccc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing for a cross-connect

cisco-hdlc-tcc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing for a translational cross-connect

extended-frame-relay-ccc—Any Frame Relay DLCI for a cross-connect

extended-frame-relay-tcc—Any Frame Relay DLCI for a translational cross-connect

flexible-frame-relay—Multiple Frame Relay encapsulations

frame-relay—Frame Relay encapsulation

frame-relay-ccc—Frame Relay for a cross-connect

frame-relay-port-ccc—Frame Relay port encapsulation for a cross-connect

frame-relay-tcc—Frame Relay for a translational cross-connect

multilink-frame-relay-uni-nni—Multilink Frame Relay UNI NNI (FRF.16) encapsulation

ppp—Serial PPP device

ppp-ccc—Serial PPP device for a cross-connect

ppp-tcc—Serial PPP device for a translational cross-connect

frame-relay-ccc—Frame Relay DLCI for CCC

frame-relay-ppp—PPP over Frame Relay

frame-relay-tcc—Frame Relay DLCI for a translational cross-connect

e3—E3 interface (including E3 IQ and IQE interfaces)

cisco-hdlc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing

cisco-hdlc-ccc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing for a cross-connect

cisco-hdlc-tcc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing for a translational cross-connect

extended-frame-relay-ccc—Any Frame Relay DLCI for a cross-connect

extended-frame-relay-tcc—Any Frame Relay DLCI for a translational cross-connect

flexible-frame-relay—Multiple Frame Relay encapsulations

frame-relay—Frame Relay encapsulation

frame-relay-ccc—Frame Relay for a cross-connect

frame-relay-port-ccc—Frame Relay port encapsulation for a cross-connect

frame-relay-tcc—Frame Relay for a translational cross-connect

ppp—Serial PPP device

ppp-ccc—Serial PPP device for a cross-connect

ppp-tcc—Serial PPP device for a translational cross-connect

frame-relay-ccc—Frame Relay DLCI for CCC

frame-relay-ppp—PPP over Frame Relay

frame-relay-tcc—Frame Relay DLCI for a translational cross-connect

em—Management and internal Ethernet interfaces

NA

NA

fe—Fast Ethernet interface

ethernet-ccc—Ethernet cross-connect

ethernet-tcc—Ethernet translational cross-connect

ethernet-vpls—Ethernet virtual private LAN service

extended-vlan-ccc—Nonstandard TPID tagging for a cross-connect

extended-vlan-tcc—802.1Q tagging for a translational cross-connect

extended-vlan-vpls—Extended VLAN virtual private LAN service

vlan-ccc—802.1Q tagging for a cross-connect

vlan-vpls—VLAN virtual private LAN service

dix—Ethernet DIXv2 (RFC 894)

vlan-ccc—802.1Q tagging for a cross-connect

vlan-vpls—VLAN virtual private LAN service

fxp—Management and internal Ethernet interfaces

NA

NA

ge—Gigabit Ethernet interface (including Gigabit Ethernet IQ interfaces)

ethernet-ccc—Ethernet cross-connect

ethernet-tcc—Ethernet translational cross-connect

ethernet-vpls—Ethernet virtual private LAN service

extended-vlan-ccc—Nonstandard TPID tagging for a cross-connect

extended-vlan-tcc—802.1Q tagging for a translational cross-connect

extended-vlan-vpls—Extended VLAN virtual private LAN service

flexible-ethernet-services—Allows per-unit Ethernet encapsulation configuration

vlan-ccc—802.1Q tagging for a cross-connect

vlan-vpls—VLAN virtual private LAN service

dix—Ethernet DIXv2 (RFC 894)

vlan-ccc—802.1Q tagging for a cross-connect

vlan-tcc—802.1Q tagging for a translational cross-connect

vlan-vpls—VLAN virtual private LAN service

ixgbe—10-Gigabit Ethernet internal interfaces

NA

NA

lo—Loopback interface; the Junos OS automatically configures one loopback interface (lo0)

NA

NA

ls—Link services interface

multilink-frame-relay-uni-nni—Multilink Frame Relay UNI NNI (FRF.16) encapsulation

multilink-frame-relay-end-to-end—Multilink Frame Relay end-to-end (FRF.15)

multilink-ppp—Multilink PPP

lsq—Link services IQ interface

multilink-frame-relay-uni-nni—Multilink Frame Relay UNI NNI (FRF.16) encapsulation

multilink-frame-relay-end-to-end—Multilink Frame Relay end-to-end (FRF.15)

multilink-ppp—Multilink PPP

lt—Logical tunnel interface

 

NA

ethernet—Ethernet service

ethernet-vpls—Ethernet virtual private LAN service

ethernet-ccc—Ethernet cross-connect

frame-relay—Frame Relay encapsulation

frame-relay-ccc—Frame Relay for a cross-connect

vlan—VLAN service

vlan-ccc—802.1Q tagging for a cross-connect

vlan-vpls—VLAN virtual private LAN service

ml—Multilink interface (including Multilink Frame Relay and MLPPP)

NA

multilink-frame-relay-end-to-end—Multilink Frame Relay end-to-end (FRF.15)

multilink-ppp—Multilink PPP

se—Serial interface (including EIA-530, V.35, and X.21 interfaces)

cisco-hdlc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing

cisco-hdlc-ccc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing for a cross-connect

cisco-hdlc-tcc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing for a translational cross-connect

frame-relay—Frame Relay encapsulation

frame-relay-ccc—Frame Relay for a cross-connect

frame-relay-port-ccc—Frame Relay port encapsulation for a cross-connect

frame-relay-tcc—Frame Relay for a translational cross-connect

ppp—Serial PPP device

ppp-ccc—Serial PPP device for a cross-connect

ppp-tcc—Serial PPP device for a translational cross-connect

frame-relay-ccc—Frame Relay DLCI for CCC

frame-relay-ppp—PPP over Frame Relay

frame-relay-tcc—Frame Relay DLCI for a translational cross-connect

so—SONET/SDH interface

cisco-hdlc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing

cisco-hdlc-ccc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing for a cross-connect

cisco-hdlc-tcc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing for a translational cross-connect

extended-frame-relay-ccc—Any Frame Relay DLCI for a cross-connect

extended-frame-relay-tcc—Any Frame Relay DLCI for a translational cross-connect

flexible-frame-relay—Multiple Frame Relay encapsulations

frame-relay—Frame Relay encapsulation

frame-relay-ccc—Frame Relay for a cross-connect

frame-relay-port-ccc—Frame Relay port encapsulation for a cross-connect

frame-relay-tcc—Frame Relay for a translational cross-connect

ppp—Serial PPP device

ppp-ccc—Serial PPP device for a cross-connect

ppp-tcc—Serial PPP device for a translational cross-connect

frame-relay-ccc—Frame Relay DLCI for CCC

frame-relay-ppp—PPP over Frame Relay

frame-relay-tcc—Frame Relay DLCI for a translational cross-connect

multilink-frame-relay-end-to-end—IQE SONET PICs support Multilink Frame Relay end-to-end (FRF.15)

multilink-ppp—IQE SONET PICs support Multilink PPP

t1—T1 interface (including channelized DS3-to-DS1 interfaces)

cisco-hdlc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing

cisco-hdlc-ccc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing for a cross-connect

cisco-hdlc-tcc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing for a translational cross-connect

extended-frame-relay-ccc—Any Frame Relay DLCI for a cross-connect

extended-frame-relay-tcc—Any Frame Relay DLCI for a translational cross-connect

flexible-frame-relay—Multiple Frame Relay encapsulations

frame-relay—Frame Relay encapsulation

frame-relay-ccc—Frame Relay for a cross-connect

frame-relay-port-ccc—Frame Relay port encapsulation for a cross-connect

frame-relay-tcc—Frame Relay for a translational cross-connect

multilink-frame-relay-uni-nni—Multilink Frame Relay UNI NNI (FRF.16) encapsulation

ppp—Serial PPP device

ppp-ccc—Serial PPP device for a cross-connect

ppp-tcc—Serial PPP device for a translational cross-connect

frame-relay-ccc—Frame Relay DLCI for CCC

frame-relay-ppp—PPP over Frame Relay

frame-relay-tcc—Frame Relay DLCI for a translational cross-connect

t3—T3 interface (including channelized OC12-to-DS3 interfaces)

cisco-hdlc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing

cisco-hdlc-ccc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing for a cross-connect

cisco-hdlc-tcc—Cisco-compatible HDLC framing for a translational cross-connect

extended-frame-relay-ccc—Any Frame Relay DLCI for a cross-connect

extended-frame-relay-tcc—Any Frame Relay DLCI for a translational cross-connect

flexible-frame-relay—Multiple Frame Relay encapsulations

frame-relay—Frame Relay encapsulation

frame-relay-ccc—Frame Relay for a cross-connect

frame-relay-port-ccc—Frame Relay port encapsulation for a cross-connect

frame-relay-tcc—Frame Relay for a translational cross-connect

ppp—Serial PPP device

ppp-ccc—Serial PPP device for a cross-connect

ppp-tcc—Serial PPP device for a translational cross-connect

frame-relay-ccc—Frame Relay DLCI for CCC

frame-relay-ppp—PPP over Frame Relay

frame-relay-tcc—Frame Relay DLCI for a translational cross-connect

Controller-level channelized IQ interfaces (cau4, coc1, coc3, coc12, cstm1, ct1, ct3, ce1)

NA

NA

Services interfaces (cp, gr, ip, mo, vt, es, mo, rsp, sp)

NA

NA

Unconfigurable, internally generated interfaces (gre, ipip, learning-chip (lc), lsi, tap, mt, mtun, pd, pe, pimd, pime)

NA

NA

Note

You can configure GRE interfaces (gre-x/y/z) only for GMPLS control channels. GRE interfaces are not supported or configurable for other applications. For more information about GMPLS, see the MPLS Applications User Guide.

Understanding Transient Interfaces

The M Series, MX Series, and T Series routers contain slots for installing Flexible PIC Concentrator [FPC] or Dense Port Concentrator [DPC] (for MX Series routers) or Modular Port Concentrator [MPC] (for MX Series routers). Physical Interface Card [PIC] can be installed in FPCs. Modular Interface Card [MIC] can be inserted into MPCs.

The number of PICs that can be installed varies by router and type of FPC. The PICs provide the actual physical interfaces to the network. The MX Series routers contain slots for installing either DPC boards that provide the physical interfaces to the network or for installing FPCs in which PICs can be installed.

You can insert any DPC or FPC into any slot that supports them in the appropriate router. Typically, you can place any combination of PICs, compatible with your router, in any location on an FPC. (You are limited by the total FPC bandwidth, and by the fact that some PICs physically require two or four of the PIC locations on the FPC. In some cases, power limitations or microcode limitations may also apply.) To determine DPC and PIC compatibility, see the see your router’s Interface Module Reference.

You can insert MPC into any slot that supports them in the appropriate router. You can install up to two MICs of different media types in the same MPC as long as the MPC supports those MICs.

These physical interfaces are transient interfaces of the router. They are referred to as transient because you can hot-swap a DPC or FPC or MPC and its PICs or MICs at any time.

You must configure each transient interface based on the slot in which the FPC or DPC or MPC is installed, the location in which the PIC or MIC is installed, and for multiple port PICs or MICs , the port to which you are connecting.

You can configure the interfaces on PICs or MICs that are already installed in the router as well as interfaces on PICs or MICs that you plan to install later. The Junos OS detects which interfaces are actually present, so when the software activates its configuration, it activates only the present interfaces and retains the configuration information for the interfaces that are not present. When the Junos OS detects that an FPC containing PICs or MPC containing MICs has been inserted into the router, the software activates the configuration for those interfaces.

Understanding Services Interfaces

Services interfaces enable you to incrementally add services to your network. The Junos OS supports the following services PICs:

  • Adaptive Services (AS) PICs—Allow you to provide multiple services on a single PIC by configuring a set of services and applications. The AS PICs offer a special range of services you configure in one or more service sets.

  • ES PIC—Provides a security suite for the IP version 4 (IPv4) and IP version 6 (IPv6) network layers. The suite provides functionality such as authentication of origin, data integrity, confidentiality, replay protection, and nonrepudiation of source. It also defines mechanisms for key generation and exchange, management of security associations, and support for digital certificates.

  • Monitoring Services PICs—Enable you to monitor traffic flow and export the monitored traffic. Monitoring traffic allows you to gather and export detailed information about IPv4 traffic flows between source and destination nodes in your network; sample all incoming IPv4 traffic on the monitoring interface and present the data in cflowd record format; perform discard accounting on an incoming traffic flow; encrypt or tunnel outgoing cflowd records, intercepted IPv4 traffic, or both; and direct filtered traffic to different packet analyzers and present the data in its original format. On a Monitoring Services II PIC, you can configure either monitoring interfaces or collector interfaces. A collector interface allows you to combine multiple cflowd records into a compressed ASCII data file and export the file to an FTP server.

  • Multilink Services, MultiServices, Link Services, and Voice Services PICs—Enable you to split, recombine, and sequence datagrams across multiple logical data links. The goal of multilink operation is to coordinate multiple independent links between a fixed pair of systems, providing a virtual link with greater bandwidth than any of the members.

  • Tunnel Services PIC—By encapsulating arbitrary packets inside a transport protocol, tunneling provides a private, secure path through an otherwise public network. Tunnels connect discontinuous subnetworks and enable encryption interfaces, virtual private networks (VPNs), and Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS).

  • On M Series and T Series routers, logical tunnel interfaces allow you to connect logical systems, virtual routers, or VPN instances. For more information about VPNs, see the Junos OS VPNs Library for Routing Devices. For more information about configuring tunnels, see the Junos OS Services Interfaces Library for Routing Devices.

Understanding Container Interfaces

Container interfaces provide the following features:

  • Automatic protection switching (APS) on SONET/SDH and ATM links are supported using the container infrastructure.

  • Container physical interfaces and logical interfaces remain up on switchover.

  • APS parameters are auto-copied from the container interface to the member links.

Note

Paired groups and true unidirectional APS are not currently supported.

For more information on SONET/SDH configuration, see Configuring Container Interfaces for APS on SONET Links.

Container interfaces features are described in the following sections:

Understanding Traditional APS Concept

Traditional APS is configured on two independent physical SONET/SDH interfaces: one configured as the working circuit and the other as the protect circuit (see Figure 4). The circuit, named Circuit X in the figure, is the link between the two SONET interfaces.

Figure 4: APS Interface
APS Interface

Traditional APS uses routing protocols that run on each individual SONET/SDH interface (since circuit is an abstract construct, instead of being an actual interface). When the working link goes down, the APS infrastructure brings up the protect link and its underlying logical interfaces, and brings down the working link and its underlying logical interfaces, causing the routing protocols to reconverge. This consumes time and leads to traffic loss even though the APS infrastructure has performed the switch quickly.

Container Interfaces Concept

To solve this problem, the Junos OS provides a soft interface construct called a container interface (see Figure 5).

Figure 5: Container Interface
Container Interface

The container interface allows routing protocols to run on the logical interfaces associated with a virtual container interface instead of on the physical SONET/SDH and ATM interfaces. When APS switches the underlying physical link based on a fault condition, the container interface remains up, and the logical interface on the container interface does not flap. The routing protocols remain unaware of the APS switching.

APS Support for Container-Based Interfaces

With the container interface, APS is configured on the container interface itself. Individual member SONET/SDH and ATM links are either marked as primary (corresponding to the working circuit) or standby (corresponding to the protect circuit) in the configuration. No circuit or group name is specified in the container interface model; physical SONET/SDH and ATM links are put in an APS group by linking them to a single container interface. APS parameters are specified at the container interface level, and are propagated to the individual SONET/SDH and ATM links by the APS daemon.

Autocopy of APS Parameters

Typical applications require copying APS parameters from the working circuit to the protect circuit, since most of the parameters must be the same for both circuits. This is automatically done in the container interface. APS parameters are specified only once under the container physical interface configuration, and are internally copied over to the individual physical SONET/SDH and ATM links.

Understanding Internal Ethernet Interfaces

Within a router or packet transport router, internal Ethernet interfaces provide communication between the Routing Engine and the Packet Forwarding Engines. The Junos OS automatically configures internal Ethernet interfaces when the Junos OS boots. The Junos OS boots the packet-forwarding component hardware. When these components are running, the Control Board uses the internal Ethernet interface to transmit hardware status information to the Routing Engine. Information transmitted includes the internal router temperature, the condition of the fans, whether an FPC has been removed or inserted, and information from the LCD on thecraft interface.

To determine the supported internal Ethernet interfaces for your router, see Supported Routing Engines by Router.

Note

Do not modify or remove the configuration for the internal Ethernet interface that the Junos OS automatically configures. If you do, the router or packet transport routerwill stop functioning.

  • M Series, and MX Series routers and T Series routers—The Junos OS creates the internal Ethernet interface. The internal Ethernet interface connects the Routing Engine re0 to the Packet Forwarding Engines.

    If the router has redundant Routing Engines, another internal Ethernet interface is created on each Routing Engine (re0 and re1) in order to support fault tolerance, two physical links between re0 and re1 connect the independent control planes. If one of the links fails, both Routing Engines can use the other link for IP communication.

  • TX Matrix Plus routers—On a TX Matrix Plus router, the Routing Engine and Control Board function as a unit, or host subsystem. For each host subsystem in the router, the Junos OS automatically creates two internal Ethernet interfaces, ixgbe0 and ixgbe1.

    The ixgbe0 and ixgbe1 interfaces connect the TX Matrix Plus Routing Engine to the Routing Engines of every line-card chassis (LCC) configured in the routing matrix.

    The TX Matrix Plus Routing Engine connects to a high-speed switch through a 10-Gbps link within the host subsystem. The switch provides a 1-Gbps link to each T1600 Routing Engine. The 1-Gbps links are provided through the UTP Category 5 Ethernet cable connections between the TXP-CBs and the LCC-CBs in the LCCs.

    • The TX Matrix Plus Routing Engine connects to a high-speed switch in the local Control Board through a 10-Gbps link within the host subsystem.

    • The Gigabit Ethernet switch connects the Control Board to the remote Routing Engines of every LCC configured in the routing matrix.

    If a TX Matrix Plus router contains redundant host subsystems, the independent control planes are connected by two physical links between the two 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports on their respective Routing Engines.

    • The primary link to the remote Routing Engine is at the ixgbe0 interface; the 10-Gigabit Ethernet switch on the local Control Board also connects the Routing Engine to the 10-Gigabit Ethernet port accessed by the ixgbe1 interface on the remote Routing Engine.

    • The alternate link to the remote Routing Engine is the 10-Gigabit Ethernet port at the ixgbe1 interface. This second port connects the Routing Engine to the 10-Gigabit Ethernet switch on the remote Control Board, which connects to the 10-Gigabit Ethernet port at the ixgbe0 interface on the remote Routing Engine.

    If one of the two links between the host subsystems fails, both Routing Engines can use the other link for IP communication.

  • LCC in a routing matrix—On an LCC configured in a routing matrix, the Routing Engine and Control Board function as a unit, or host subsystem. For each host subsystem in the LCC, the Junos OS automatically creates two internal Ethernet interfaces, bcm0 and em1, for the two Gigabit Ethernet ports on the Routing Engine.

    The bcm0 interface connects the Routing Engine in each LCCto the Routing Engines of every other LCC configured in the routing matrix.

    • The Routing Engine connects to a Gigabit Ethernet switch on the local Control Board through a.

    • The switch connects the Control Board to the remote Routing Engines of every other LCC configured in the routing matrix.

    If an LCC in a routing matrix contains redundant host subsystems, the independent control planes are connected by two physical links between the Gigabit Ethernet ports on their respective Routing Engines.

    • The primary link to the remote Routing Engine is at the bcm0 interface; the Gigabit Ethernet switch on the local Control Board also connects the Routing Engine to the Gigabit Ethernet port accessed by the em1 interface on the remote Routing Engine.

    • The alternate link to the remote Routing Engine is at the em1 interface. This second port connects the Routing Engine to the Gigabit Ethernet switch on the remote Control Board, which connects to the Gigabit Ethernet port at the bcm0 interface on the remote Routing Engine.

    If one of the two links between the host subsystems fails, both Routing Engines can use the other link for IP communication.

Each router also has two serial ports, labeled console and auxiliary, for connecting tty type terminals to the router using standard PC-type tty cables. Although these ports are not network interfaces, they do provide access to the router.

Understanding Interfaces on ACX Series Universal Metro Routers

The ACX Series routers support time-division multiplexing (TDM) T1 and E1 interfaces and Ethernet (1 GbE copper, 1GbE, 10 GbE, and 40 GbE fiber) interfaces to support both the legacy and evolution needs of the mobile network. Support for Power over Ethernet (PoE+) at 65 watts per port mitigates the need for additional electrical cabling for microwaves or other access interfaces.

The ACX Series routers support the following:

  • TDM T1 and E1 ports:

    • The ACX1000 router contains eight T1 or E1 ports.

    • The ACX2000 router contains 16 T1 or E1 ports.

    • Inverse Multiplexing for ATM (IMA)

    Note

    ACX5048 and ACX5096 routers do not support T1 or E1 ports and Inverse Multiplexing for ATM (IMA).

  • Gigabit Ethernet ports:

    • The ACX1000 router contains eight Gigabit Ethernet ports. The ACX1000 router also supports either four RJ45 (Cu) ports or installation of four Gigabit Ethernet small form-factor pluggable (SFP) transceivers.

    • The ACX2000 router contains 16 Gigabit Ethernet ports and two PoE ports. The ACX2000 router also supports installation of two Gigabit Ethernet SFP transceivers and two 10-Gigabit Ethernet SFP+ transceivers.

    • The ACX5448 router is a 10-Gigabit Ethernet enhanced small form-factor pluggable (SFP+) top-of-rack router with 48 SFP+ ports, and four 100-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP28 ports. Each SFP+ port can operate as a native 10-Gigabit Ethernet port, or as a 1-Gigabit Ethernet port when 1-Gigabit optics are inserted. The 48 ports on ACX5448 router can be configured as 1GE or 10GE modes and these ports are represented by xe interface type. The PIC 1 of FPC 0 has 4x100GE ports, where each port can be channelized as 1x100GE, or 1x40GE, or 4x25GE modes and these ports are represented by et interface type. By default, the port speed in PIC 1 is 100GE.

      Note

      The ACX5448 router do not support Pseudowire Services interface.

    Note

    40GbE is supported only on ACX5048, ACX5096, and ACX5448 routers. ACX5448 router support 40GbE channeling to 10GbE.

T1 and E1 Time-Division Multiplexing (TDM) Interfaces

On the ACX Series routers, existing Junos OS TDM features are supported without changes to statements or functionality. The following key TDM features for T1 (ct1) interfaces and E1 (ce1) interfaces are supported:

  • T1 and E1 channelization

  • T1 and E1 encapsulation

  • Alarms, defects, and statistics

  • External and internal loopback

  • TDM class of service (CoS)

T1 and E1 mode selection is at the PIC level. To set the T1 or E1 mode at the PIC level, include the framing statement with the t1 or e1 option at the [chassis fpc slot-number pic slot-number] hierarchy level. All ports can be T1 or E1. Mixing T1s and E1s is not supported.

T1 or E1 BITS Interface (ACX2000)

The ACX2000 router has a T1 or E1 building-integrated timing supply (BITS) interface that you can connect to an external clock. After you connect the interface to the external clock, you can configure the BITS interface so that the BITS interface becomes a candidate source for chassis synchronization to the external clock. The frequency of the BITS interface depends on the Synchronous Ethernet equipment client clock (EEC) selected with the network-option statement at the [edit chassis synchronization] hierarchy level.

Note

The ACX1000 router does not support the BITS interface.

Inverse Multiplexing for ATM (IMA)

Defined by the ATM Forum, IMA specification version 1.1 is a standardized technology used to transport ATM traffic over a bundle of T1 and E1 interfaces, also known as an IMA group. Up to eight links per bundle and 16 bundles per PIC are supported. The following key IMA features are supported:

  • IMA Layer 2 encapsulation

  • ATM CoS

  • ATM policing and shaping

  • Denied packets counter in the output for the show interfaces at-fpc/pic/port extensive command

Gigabit Ethernet interfaces

On the ACX Series routers, existing Junos OS Ethernet features are supported without changes to statements or functionality. The following key features are supported:

  • Media type specification (ACX1000 router with Gigabit Ethernet SFP and RJ45 interfaces)

  • Autonegotiation for RJ45 Gigabit Ethernet interfaces

  • Event handling of SFP insertion and removal

  • Explicit disabling of the physical interface

  • Flow control

    Note

    The ACX Series router does not support flow control based on PAUSE frames.

  • Loopback

  • Loss of signal (LOS) alarm

  • Media access control (MAC) layer features

  • Maximum transmission unit (MTU)

  • Remote fault notification for 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces

  • Statistics collection and handling

  • Power over Ethernet (PoE) (ACX2000 router)

  • High power mode

The Gigabit Ethernet ports on the router have the capacity to work as a 1 or 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface, depending on the type of small form-factor pluggable (SFP) transceiver inserted. When you insert an SFP+ transceiver, the interface works at the 10-Gigabit speed. When you insert an SFP transceiver, the interface works at the 1-Gigabit speed. Configuration is not required because the speed is determined automatically based on the type of inserted SFP transceiver. The dual-speed interface is automatically created with the xe prefix, for example, xe-4/0/0.

The same configuration statements are used for both speeds and CoS parameters are scaled as a percentage of the port speed. To configure a dual-speed Gigabit Ethernet interface, include the interface xe-fpc/pic/port statement at the [edit interfaces] hierarchy level. To display the interface speed and other details, issue the show interfaces command.

Note

You need to use industrial grade of SFP below 0dC for ACX 1100 and ACX 2100 boards.

TX Matrix Plus and T1600 Router (Routing Matrix) Management Ethernet Interfaces

For TX Matrix Plus Routers and for T1600 Core Routers with RE-C1800 configured in a routing matrix, the Junos OS automatically creates the router’s management Ethernet interface, em0. To use em0 as a management port, you must configure its logical port, em0.0, with a valid IP address.

When you enter the show interfaces command on a TX Matrix Plus router, the management Ethernet interfaces (and logical interfaces) are displayed:

user@host> show interfaces ?
Note

The Routing Engines in the TX Matrix Plus router and in the T1600 routers with RE-C1800 configured in a routing matrix do not support the management Ethernet interface fxp0, or the internal Ethernet interfaces fxp1 or fxp2.

T1600 Routers (Routing Matrix) Internal Ethernet Interfaces

On a T1600 router configured in a routing matrix, the Routing Engine (RE-TXP-LCC) and Control Board (LCC-CB) function as a unit, or host subsystem. For each host subsystem in the router, the Junos OS automatically creates two internal Ethernet interfaces, bcm0 and em1, for the two Gigabit Ethernet ports on the Routing Engine.