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Remote Nework Monitoring (RMON)

 
Summary

This section describes how Junos OS supports the Remote Network Monitoring (RMON) MIB (RFC 2819) that allows a management device to monitor the values of MIB objects, or variables, against configured thresholds. When the value of a variable crosses a threshold, an alarm and its corresponding event are generated. The event can be logged and can generate an SNMP trap.

Understanding RMON

RMON Overview

An operational support system (OSS) or a fault-monitoring system can be used to automatically monitor events that track many different metrics, including performance, availability, faults, and environmental data. For example, an administrator might want to know when the internal temperature of a chassis has risen above a configured threshold, which might indicate that a chassis fan tray is faulty, the chassis air flow is impeded, or the facility cooling system in the vicinity of the chassis is not operating normally.

The RMON MIB also defines tables that store various statistics for Ethernet interfaces, including the etherStatsTable and the etherHistoryTable. The etherStatsTable contains cumulative real-time statistics for Ethernet interfaces, such as the number of unicast, multicast, and broadcast packets received on an interface. The etherHistoryTable maintains a historical sample of statistics for Ethernet interfaces. The control of the etherHistoryTable, including the interfaces to track and the sampling interval, is defined by the RMON historyControlTable.

To enable RMON alarms, you perform the following steps:

  1. Configure SNMP, including trap groups. You configure SNMP at the [edit snmp] hierarchy level.

  2. Configure rising and falling events in the eventTable, including the event types and trap groups. You can also configure events using the CLI at the [edit snmp rmon event] hierarchy level.

  3. Configure alarms in the alarmTable, including the variables to monitor, rising and falling thresholds, the sampling types and intervals, and the corresponding events to generate when alarms occur. You can also configure alarms using the CLI at the [edit snmp rmon alarm] hierarchy level.

    Extensions to the alarmTable are defined in the Juniper Networks enterprise-specific MIB jnxRmon (mib-jnx-rmon.txt).

Alarm Thresholds and Events

By setting a rising and a falling threshold for a monitored variable, you can be alerted whenever the value of the variable falls outside the allowable operational range (see Figure 1).

Figure 1: Setting Thresholds
Setting Thresholds

Events are only generated when the alarm threshold is first crossed in any one direction rather than after each sample interval. For example, if a rising threshold alarm, along with its corresponding event, is raised, no more threshold crossing events occur until a corresponding falling alarm occurs. This considerably reduces the quantity of events that are produced by the system, making it easier for operations staff to react when events do occur.

Before you configure remote monitoring, you should identify what variables need to be monitored and their allowable operational range. This requires some period of baselining to determine the allowable operational ranges. An initial baseline period of at least

3 months is not unusual when you first identify the operational ranges and define thresholds, but baseline monitoring should continue over the life span of each monitored variable.

Understanding RMON Alarms

An RMON alarm identifies:

  • A specific MIB object that is monitored.

  • The frequency of sampling.

  • The method of sampling.

  • The thresholds against which the monitored values are compared.

An RMON alarm can also identify a specific eventTable entry to be triggered when a threshold is crossed.

Configuration and operational values are defined in alarmTable in RFC 2819. Additional operational values are defined in Juniper Networks enterprise-specific extensions to alarmTable (jnxRmonAlarmTable).

This topic covers the following sections:

alarmTable

alarmTable in the RMON MIB allows you to monitor and poll the following:

  • alarmIndex—The index value for alarmTable that identifies a specific entry.

  • alarmInterval—The interval, in seconds, over which data is sampled and compared with the rising and falling thresholds.

  • alarmVariable—The MIB variable that is monitored by the alarm entry.

  • alarmSampleType—The method of sampling the selected variable and calculating the value to be compared against the thresholds.

  • alarmValue—The value of the variable during the last sampling period. This value is compared with the rising and falling thresholds.

  • alarmStartupAlarm—The alarm sent when the entry is first activated.

  • alarmRisingThreshold—The upper threshold for the sampled variable.

  • alarmFallingThreshold—The lower threshold for the sampled variable.

  • alarmRisingEventIndex—The eventTable entry used when a rising threshold is crossed.

  • alarmFallingEventIndex—The eventTable entry used when a falling threshold is crossed.

  • alarmStatus—Method for adding and removing entries from the table. It can also be used to change the state of an entry to allow modifications.

    Note

    If this object is not set to valid, the associated event alarm does not take any action.

jnxRmonAlarmTable

The jnxRmonAlarmTable is a Juniper Networks enterprise-specific extension to alarmTable. It provides additional operational information and includes the following objects:

  • jnxRmonAlarmGetFailCnt—The number of times the internal Get request for the variable monitored by this entry has failed.

  • jnxRmonAlarmGetFailTime—The value of sysUpTime when an internal Get request for the variable monitored by this entry last failed.

  • jnxRmonAlarmGetFailReason—The reason an internal Get request for the variable monitored by this entry last failed.

  • jnxRmonAlarmGetOkTime—The value of sysUpTime when an internal Get request for the variable monitored by this entry succeeded and the entry left the getFailure state.

  • jnxRmonAlarmState—The current state of this RMON alarm entry.

To view the Juniper Networks enterprise-specific extensions to the RMON Events and Alarms and Event MIB, see https://www.juniper.net/documentation/en_US/junos16.1/topics/reference/mibs/mib-jnx-rmon.txt.

Understanding RMON Events

An RMON event allows you to log the crossing of thresholds of other MIB objects. It is defined in eventTable for the RMON MIB.

This section covers the following topics:

eventTable

eventTable contains the following objects:

  • eventIndex—An index that uniquely identifies an entry in eventTable. Each entry defines one event that is generated when the appropriate conditions occur.

  • eventDescription—A comment describing the event entry.

  • eventType—Type of notification that the probe makes about this event.

  • eventCommunity—Trap group used if an SNMP trap is to be sent. If eventCommunity is not configured, a trap is sent to each trap group configured with the rmon-alarm category.

  • eventLastTimeSent—Value of sysUpTime when this event entry last generated an event.

  • eventOwner—Any text string specified by the creating management application or the command-line interface (CLI). Typically, it is used to identify a network manager (or application) and can be used for fine access control between participating management applications.

  • eventStatus—Status of this event entry.

    Note

    If this object is not set to valid, no action is taken by the associated event entry. When this object is set to valid, all previous log entries associated with this entry (if any) are deleted.

Understanding RMON Alarms and Events Configuration

Junos OS supports monitoring routers from remote devices. These values are measured against thresholds and trigger events when the thresholds are crossed. You configure remote monitoring (RMON) alarm and event entries to monitor the value of a MIB object.

To configure RMON alarm and event entries, you include statements at the [edit snmp] hierarchy level of the configuration:

RMON MIB Event, Alarm, Log, and History Control Tables

Table 1 provides each field in the RMON eventTable, the description of the field, and the corresponding Junos OS statement that you can use to configure the field. The Junos OS statements reside at the [edit snmp rmon] hierarchy level.

Table 1: RMON Event Table

Field

Description

Statement [edit snmp rmon]

eventDescription

Text description of this event.

description

eventType

Type of event (for example, log, trap, or log and trap).

type

eventCommunity

Trap group to which to send this event, as defined in the Junos OS configuration. (This is not the same as the SNMP community.)

community

eventOwner

Entity (for example, manager) that created this event.

eventStatus

Status of this row (for example, valid, invalid, or createRequest).

Table 2 provides each field in the RMON alarmTable, the description of the field, and the corresponding Junos OS statement that you can use to configure the field. The Junos OS statements reside at the [edit snmp rmon] hierarchy level.

Table 2: RMON Alarm Table

Field

Description

Statement [edit snmp rmon]

alarmStatus

Status of this row (for example, valid, invalid, or createRequest)

alarmInterval

Sampling period (in seconds) of the monitored variable

interval

alarmVariable

Object identifier (OID) and instance of the variable to be monitored

alarmValue

Actual value of the sampled variable

alarmSampleType

Sample type (absolute or delta changes)

sample-type

alarmStartupAlarm

Initial alarm (rising, falling, or either)

startup-alarm

alarmRisingThreshold

Rising threshold against which to compare the value

rising-threshold

alarmFallingThreshold

Falling threshold against which to compare the value

falling-threshold

alarmRisingEventIndex

Index (row) of the rising event in the event table

rising-event-index

alarmFallingEventIndex

Index (row) of the falling event in the event table

falling-event-index

Table 3 provides each field in the jnxRmon jnxRmonAlarmTable, which is an extension to the RMON alarmTable. You can troubleshoot the RMON agent, rmopd, that runs on a switch by inspecting the contents of the jnxRmonAlarmTable object.

Table 3: jnxRmon Alarm Table

Field

Description

jnxRmonAlarmGetFailCnt

Number of times the internal Get request for the variable failed

jnxRmonAlarmGetFailTime

Value of the sysUpTime object when the last failure occurred

jnxRmonAlarmGetFailReason

Reason why the Get request failed

jnxRmonAlarmGetOkTime

Value of the sysUpTime object when the variable moved out of failure state

jnxRmonAlarmState

Status of this alarm entry

Table 4 provides each field in the RMON historyControlTable, the description of the field, and the corresponding Junos OS statement that you can use to configure the field. The Junos OS statements reside at the [edit snmp rmon history] hierarchy level. The historyControlTable controls the RMON etherHistoryTable.

Table 4: RMON History Control Table

Field

Description

Statement [edit snmp rmon history]

historyControlDataSource

Identifies the source of the data for which historical data was collected.

interface

historyControlBucketsRequested

Requested number of discrete time intervals over which data is to be saved.

bucket-size

historyControlBucketsGranted

Number of discrete sampling intervals over which data is to be saved.

historyControlInterval

Interval, in seconds, over which the data is sampled for each bucket.

interval

historyControlOwner

Entity that configured this entry.

owner

historyControlStatus

Status of this entry.

Minimum RMON Alarm and Event Entry Configuration

To enable RMON on the router, you must configure an alarm entry and an event entry. To do this, include the following statements at the [edit snmp rmon] hierarchy level:

Configuring an RMON Alarm Entry and Its Attributes

An alarm entry monitors the value of a MIB variable. You can configure how often the value is sampled, the type of sampling to perform, and what event to trigger if a threshold is crossed.

This section discusses the following topics:

Configuring the Alarm Entry

An alarm entry monitors the value of a MIB variable. The rising-event-index, rising-threshold, sample-type, and variable statements are mandatory. All other statements are optional.

To configure the alarm entry, include the alarm statement and specify an index at the [edit snmp rmon] hierarchy level:

index is an integer that identifies an alarm or event entry.

Configuring the Description

The description is a text string that identifies the alarm entry.

To configure the description, include the description statement and a description of the alarm entry at the [edit snmp rmon alarm index] hierarchy level:

Configuring the Falling Event Index or Rising Event Index

The falling event index identifies the event entry that is triggered when a falling threshold is crossed. The rising event index identifies the event entry that is triggered when a rising threshold is crossed.

To configure the falling event index or rising event index, include the falling-event-index or rising-event-index statement and specify an index at the [edit snmp rmon alarm index] hierarchy level:

index can be from 0 through 65,535. The default for both the falling and rising event index is 0.

Configuring the Falling Threshold or Rising Threshold

The falling threshold is the lower threshold for the monitored variable. When the current sampled value is less than or equal to this threshold, and the value at the last sampling interval is greater than this threshold, a single event is generated. A single event is also generated if the first sample after this entry becomes valid is less than or equal to this threshold, and the associated startup alarm is equal to falling-alarm or rising-or-falling-alarm. After a falling event is generated, another falling event cannot be generated until the sampled value rises above this threshold and reaches the rising threshold. You must specify the falling threshold as an integer. Its default is 20 percent less than the rising threshold.

By default, the rising threshold is 0. The rising threshold is the upper threshold for the monitored variable. When the current sampled value is greater than or equal to this threshold, and the value at the last sampling interval is less than this threshold, a single event is generated. A single event is also generated if the first sample after this entry becomes valid is greater than or equal to this threshold, and the associated startup-alarm is equal to rising-alarm or rising-or-falling-alarm. After a rising event is generated, another rising event cannot be generated until the sampled value falls below this threshold and reaches the falling threshold. You must specify the rising threshold as an integer.

To configure the falling threshold or rising threshold, include the falling-threshold or rising-threshold statement at the [edit snmp rmon alarm index] hierarchy level:

integer can be a value from -2,147,483,647 through 2,147,483,647.

Configuring the Interval

The interval represents the period of time, in seconds, over which the monitored variable is sampled and compared with the rising and falling thresholds.

To configure the interval, include the interval statement and specify the number of seconds at the [edit snmp rmon alarm index] hierarchy level:

seconds can be a value from 1 through 2,147,483,647. The default is 60 seconds.

Configuring the Falling Threshold Interval

The falling threshold interval represents the interval between samples when the rising threshold is crossed. Once the alarm crosses the falling threshold, the regular sampling interval is used.

Note

You cannot configure the falling threshold interval for alarms that have the request type set to walk-request.

To configure the falling threshold interval, include the falling-threshold interval statement at the [edit snmp rmon alarm index] hierarchy level and specify the number of seconds:

seconds can be a value from 1 through 2,147,483,647. The default is 60 seconds.

Configuring the Request Type

By default an RMON alarm can monitor only one object instance (as specified in the configuration). You can configure a request-type statement to extend the scope of the RMON alarm to include all object instances belonging to a MIB branch or to include the next object instance after the instance specified in the configuration.

To configure the request type, include the request-type statement at the [edit snmp rmon alarm index] hierarchy level and specify get-next-request, get-request, or walk-request:

walk extends the RMON alarm configuration to all object instances belonging to a MIB branch. next extends the RMON alarm configuration to include the next object instance after the instance specified in the configuration.

Configuring the Sample Type

The sample type identifies the method of sampling the selected variable and calculating the value to be compared against the thresholds. If the value of this object is absolute-value, the value of the selected variable is compared directly with the thresholds at the end of the sampling interval. If the value of this object is delta-value, the value of the selected variable at the last sample is subtracted from the current value, and the difference is compared with the thresholds.

To configure the sample type, include the sample-type statement and specify the type of sample at the [edit snmp rmon alarm index] hierarchy level:

  • absolute-value—Actual value of the selected variable is compared against the thresholds.

  • delta-value—Difference between samples of the selected variable is compared against the thresholds.

Configuring the Startup Alarm

The startup alarm identifies the type of alarm that can be sent when this entry is first activated. You can specify it as falling-alarm, rising-alarm, or rising-or-falling-alarm.

To configure the startup alarm, include the startup-alarm statement and specify the type of alarm at the [edit snmp rmon alarm index] hierarchy level:

  • falling-alarm—Generated if the first sample after the alarm entry becomes active is less than or equal to the falling threshold.

  • rising-alarm—Generated if the first sample after the alarm entry becomes active is greater than or equal to the rising threshold.

  • rising-or-falling-alarm—Generated if the first sample after the alarm entry becomes active satisfies either of the corresponding thresholds.

The default is rising-or-falling-alarm.

Configuring the System Log Tag

The syslog-subtag statement specifies the tag to be added to the system log message. You can specify a string of not more than 80 uppercase characters as the system log tag.

To configure the system log tag, include the syslog-subtag statement at the [edit snmp rmon alarm index] hierarchy level:

Configuring the Variable

The variable identifies the MIB object that is being monitored.

To configure the variable, include the variable statement and specify the object identifier or object name at the [edit snmp rmon alarm index] hierarchy level:

oid-variable is a dotted decimal (for example, 1.3.6.1.2.1.2.1.2.2.1.10.1) or MIB object name (for example, ifInOctets.1).

Configuring an RMON Event Entry and Its Attributes

An event entry generates a notification for an alarm entry when its rising or falling threshold is crossed. You can configure the type of notification that is generated. To configure the event entry, include the event statement at the [edit snmp rmon] hierarchy level. All statements except the event statement are optional.

index identifies an entry event.

community-name is the trap group that is used when generating a trap. If that trap group has the rmon-alarm trap category configured, a trap is sent to all the targets configured for that trap group. The community string in the trap matches the name of the trap group. If nothing is configured, all the trap groups are examined, and traps are sent using each group with the rmon-alarm category set.

description is a text string that identifies the entry.

The type variable of an event entry specifies where the event is to be logged. You can specify the type as one of the following:

  • log—Adds the event entry to the logTable.

  • log-and-trap—Sends an SNMP trap and creates a log entry.

  • none—Sends no notification.

  • snmptrap—Sends an SNMP trap.

The default for the event entry type is log-and-trap.

Example: Configuring an RMON Alarm and Event Entry

Configure an RMON alarm and event entry:

Configuring RMON History Sampling

The Junos OS supports the history control group (etherHistoryTable) of the Remote Network Monitoring (RMON) MIB (RFC 2819). The history control tables record statistical samples from an Ethernet network and store them for later retrieval.

To configure RMON history sampling and view or clear collected statistics using the Junos OS CLI, perform the following tasks:

Configuring RMON History Sampling Collection

Use the history statement at the [edit snmp rmon] hierarchy level to configure RMON history sampling collection parameters. The following parameters are required:

  • History index: The history entry is identified by an integer history index value (historyControlIndex MIB field) specified when you configure this statement, which is used to display or clear collected results later.

  • Interface: The interface to monitor for the specified history index. Only one interface can be associated with a particular RMON history index.

In addition to the required parameters, you can specify a custom sampling interval (in seconds) and the sampling bucket-size (number of discrete samples to be collected in a given interval).

[edit snmp]
user@switch# set rmon history history-index interface interface-name
user@switch# set rmon history history-index interval seconds
user@switch# set rmon history history-index bucket-size number

An optional tag (owner) associated with the history index can also be assigned to the collection.

Viewing and Clearing RMON History Statistics

Use the show snmp rmon history command to display collected RMON history table entries. You can also use the show snmp mib walk command to view RMON history table field samples.

The following sample RMON configuration sets up a history table sampling for interface xe-0/0/20.0 using a history index value of 1:

user@switch# show snmp | display set

Using the show snmp mib walk command, you can see etherHistoryPkts field statistics collected for history index 1:

user@switch> show snmp mib walk etherHistoryPkts

To clear collected RMON history statistics, use the clear snmp history command. After clearing samples collected up to that point, collection continues again at the configured interval, and new samples are recorded. This command has options to clear collected samples of a particular configured history index or to clear all samples from all configured indices.

For example, the following command clears collected RMON history samples for history control index 1 configured above:

user@switch> clear snmp history 1
user@switch> show snmp mib walk etherHistoryPkts | no-more
user@switch> show snmp mib walk etherHistoryPkts | no-more

Using alarmTable to Monitor MIB Objects

To use alarmTable to monitor a MIB object, perform the following tasks:

Creating an Alarm Entry

To create an alarm entry, first create a new row in alarmTable using the alarmStatus object. For example, create alarm #1 using the UCD command-line utilities:

Configuring the Alarm MIB Objects

Once you have created the new row in alarmTable, configure the following Alarm MIB objects:

Note

Other than alarmStatus, you cannot modify any of the objects in the entry if the associated alarmStatus object is set to valid.

alarmInterval

The interval, in seconds, over which data is sampled and compared with the rising and falling thresholds. For example, to set alarmInterval for alarm #1 to 30 seconds, use the following SNMP Set request:

alarmVariable

The object identifier of the variable to be sampled. During a Set request, if the supplied variable name is not available in the selected MIB view, a badValue error is returned. If at any time the variable name of an established alarmEntry is no longer available in the selected MIB view, the probe changes the status of alarmVariable to invalid. For example, to identify ifInOctets.61 as the variable to be monitored, use the following SNMP Set request:

alarmSampleType

The method of sampling the selected variable and calculating the value to be compared against the thresholds. If the value of this object is absoluteValue, the value of the selected variable is compared directly with the thresholds at the end of the sampling interval. If the value of this object is deltaValue, the value of the selected variable at the last sample is subtracted from the current value, and the difference is compared with the thresholds. For example, to set alarmSampleType for alarm #1 to deltaValue, use the following SNMP Set request:

alarmValue

The value of the variable during the last sampling period. This value is compared with the rising and falling thresholds. If the sample type is deltaValue, this value equals the difference between the samples at the beginning and end of the period. If the sample type is absoluteValue, this value equals the sampled value at the end of the period.

alarmStartupAlarm

An alarm that is sent when this entry is first set to valid. If the first sample after this entry becomes valid is greater than or equal to risingThreshold, and alarmStartupAlarm is equal to risingAlarm or risingOrFallingAlarm, then a single rising alarm is generated. If the first sample after this entry becomes valid is less than or equal to fallingThreshold and alarmStartupAlarm is equal to fallingAlarm or risingOrFallingAlarm, then a single falling alarm is generated. For example, to set alarmStartupAlarm for alarm #1 to risingOrFallingAlarm, use the following SNMP Set request:

alarmRisingThreshold

A threshold for the sampled variable. When the current sampled value is greater than or equal to this threshold, and the value at the last sampling interval is less than this threshold, a single event is generated. A single event is also generated if the first sample after this entry becomes valid is greater than or equal to this threshold, and the associated alarmStartupAlarm is equal to risingAlarm or risingOrFallingAlarm. After a rising event is generated, another rising event cannot be generated until the sampled value falls below this threshold and reaches alarmFallingThreshold. For example, to set alarmRisingThreshold for alarm #1 to 100000, use the following SNMP Set request:

alarmFallingThreshold

A threshold for the sampled variable. When the current sampled value is less than or equal to this threshold, and the value at the last sampling interval is greater than this threshold, a single event is generated. A single event is also generated if the first sample after this entry becomes valid is less than or equal to this threshold, and the associated alarmStartupAlarm is equal to fallingAlarm or risingOrFallingAlarm. After a falling event is generated, another falling event cannot be generated until the sampled value rises above this threshold and reaches alarmRisingThreshold. For example, to set alarmFallingThreshold for alarm #1 to 10000, use the following SNMP Set request:

alarmOwner

Any text string specified by the creating management application or the command-line interface (CLI). Typically, it is used to identify a network manager (or application) and can be used for fine access control between participating management applications.

alarmRisingEventIndex

The index of the eventEntry object that is used when a rising threshold is crossed. If there is no corresponding entry in eventTable, then no association exists. If this value is zero, no associated event is generated because zero is not a valid event index. For example, to set alarmRisingEventIndex for alarm #1 to 10, use the following SNMP Set request:

alarmFallingEventIndex

The index of the eventEntry object that is used when a falling threshold is crossed. If there is no corresponding entry in eventTable, then no association exists. If this value is zero, no associated event is generated because zero is not a valid event index. For example, to set alarmFallingEventIndex for alarm #1 to 10, use the following SNMP Set request:

Activating a New Row in alarmTable

To activate a new row in alarmTable, set alarmStatus to valid using an SNMP Set request:

Modifying an Active Row in alarmTable

To modify an active row, first set alarmStatus to underCreation using an SNMP Set request:

Then change the row contents using an SNMP Set request:

Finally, activate the row by setting alarmStatus to valid using an SNMP Set request:

Deactivating a Row in alarmTable

To deactivate a row in alarmTable, set alarmStatus to invalid using an SNMP Set request:

Using eventTable to Log Alarms

To use eventTable to log alarms, perform the following tasks:

Creating an Event Entry

The RMON eventTable controls the generation of notifications from the router. Notifications can be logs (entries to logTable and syslogs) or SNMP traps. Each event entry can be configured to generate any combination of these notifications (or no notification). When an event specifies that an SNMP trap is to be generated, the trap group that is used when sending the trap is specified by the value of the associated eventCommunity object. Consequently, the community in the trap message will match the value specified by eventCommunity. If nothing is configured for eventCommunity, a trap is sent using each trap group that has the rmon-alarm category configured.

Configuring the MIB Objects

Once you have created the new row in eventTable, set the following objects:

Note

The eventType object is required. All other objects are optional.

eventType

The type of notification that the router generates when the event is triggered.

This object can be set to the following values:

  • log—Adds the event entry to logTable.

  • log-and-trap—Sends an SNMP trap and creates a log entry.

  • none—Sends no notification.

  • snmptrap—Sends an SNMP trap.

For example, to set eventType for event #1 to log-and-trap, use the following SNMP Set request:

eventCommunity

The trap group that is used when generating a trap (if eventType is configured to send traps). If that trap group has the rmon-alarm trap category configured, a trap is sent to all the targets configured for that trap group. The community string in the trap matches the name of the trap group (and hence, the value of eventCommunity). If nothing is configured, traps are sent to each group with the rmon-alarm category set. For example, to set eventCommunity for event #1 to boy-elroy, use the following SNMP Set request:

Note

The eventCommunity object is optional. If you do not set this object, then the field is left blank.

eventOwner

Any text string specified by the creating management application or the command-line interface (CLI). Typically, it is used to identify a network manager (or application) and can be used for fine access control between participating management applications.

For example, to set eventOwner for event #1 to george jetson, use the following SNMP Set request:

Note

The eventOwner object is optional. If you do not set this object, then the field is left blank.

eventDescription

Any text string specified by the creating management application or the command-line interface (CLI). The use of this string is application dependent.

For example, to set eventDescription for event #1 to spacelys sprockets, use the following SNMP Set request:

Note

The eventDescription object is optional. If you do not set this object, then the field is left blank.

Activating a New Row in eventTable

To activate the new row in eventTable, set eventStatus to valid using an SNMP Set request such as:

Deactivating a Row in eventTable

To deactivate a row in eventTable, set eventStatus to invalid using an SNMP Set request such as: