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Network Analytics

 
Summary

This section describes the network analytics feature that provides visibility into the performance and behavior of the data center infrastructure. It collects data from the switch, analyzes the data by using sophisticated algorithms, and captures the results in reports. Network administrators can use the reports to troubleshoot problems, make decisions, and adjust resources as needed.

Network Analytics Overview

The analytics manager (analyticsm) in the Packet Forwarding Engine collects traffic and queue statistics, and the analytics daemon (analyticsd) in the Routing Engine analyzes the data and generates reports. You can enable network analytics by configuring microburst monitoring and high-frequency traffic statistics monitoring.

Note

In Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15, the network analytics feature was enhanced, and extensive changes were made to the CLI statements and hierarchies. If you upgrade to Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 or later from a release prior to 13.2X51-D15, network analytics configurations committed in previous releases will appear on your device, but the feature is disabled. To enable this feature, you must reconfigure it by using the new CLI statements and hierarchies.

For more information, see:

Analytics Feature Overview

You enable network analytics by configuring queue (microburst) monitoring and high-frequency traffic statistics monitoring. You use microburst monitoring to look at traffic queue conditions in the network. A microburst occurrence indicates to the Packet Forwarding Engine that a user-specified queue depth or latency threshold is reached. The queue depth is the buffer (in bytes) containing the data, and latency is the time (in nanoseconds or microseconds) the data stays in the queue.

You can configure queue monitoring based on either queue depth or latency (but not both), and configure the frequency (polling interval) at which the Packet Forwarding Engine checks for microbursts and sends the data to the Routing Engine for processing. You may configure queue monitoring globally for all physical interfaces on the system, or for a specific interface on the switch. However, the specified queue monitoring interval applies either to all interfaces, or none; you cannot configure the interval for each interface.

You use high-frequency traffic statistics monitoring to collect traffic statistics at specified polling intervals. Similar to the queue monitoring interval, the traffic monitoring interval applies either to all interfaces, or none; you cannot configure the interval for each interface.

Both traffic and queue monitoring are disabled by default. You must configure each type of monitoring using the CLI. In each case, the configuration for an interface always takes precedence over the global configuration.

Note

You can configure traffic and queue monitoring for physical interfaces only; logical interfaces and Virtual Chassis port (VCP) interfaces are not supported.

The analyticsd daemon in the Routing Engine generates local log files containing queue and traffic statistics records. You can specify the log filename and size, and the number of log files. If you do not configure a filename, the data is not saved.

You can display the local log file or specify a server to receive the streaming data containing the queue and traffic statistics.

For each port, information for the last 10 records of traffic statistics and 100 records of queue statistics is cached. You may view this information by using the show analytics commands.

To store traceoptions data, you configure the traceoptions statement at the [edit services analytics] hierarchy level.

Network Analytics Enhancements Overview

Beginning in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15, the network analytics feature provides the following enhancements:

  • Resources—Consist of interfaces and system. The interfaces resource allows you to configure an interface name and an associated resource profile name for each interface. With the system resource, you can configure the polling intervals for queue monitoring and traffic monitoring, and an associated resource profile for the system.

  • Resource profile—A template that contains the configurations for queue and traffic monitoring, such as depth threshold and latency threshold values, and whether each type of monitoring is enabled or disabled. Once a resource profile is configured, you apply it to a system or interfaces resource.

  • Collector—A server for collecting queue and traffic monitoring statistics, and can be a local or remote server. You can configure a local server to store monitoring statistics in a log file, or a remote server to receive streamed statistics data.

  • Export profile—You must configure an export profile if you wish to send streaming data to a remote collector. In the export profile, you define the category of streamed data (system-wide or interface-specific) to determine stream type the collector will receive. You can specify both system and interface stream categories. System data includes system information and status of queue and traffic monitoring. Interface-specific data includes interface information, queue and traffic statistics, and link, queue, and traffic status.

  • Google Protocol Buffer (GBP) stream format—A new streaming format for monitoring statistics data that is sent to a remote collector in a single AnRecord message. This stream format provides nine types of information, including:

    • System information—General system information, including boot time, model information, serial number, number of ports, and so on.

    • System queue status—Queue status for the system in general.

    • System traffic status—Traffic status for the system in general.

    • Interface information—Includes SNMP index, slot, port, and other information.

    • Queue statistics for interfaces—Queue statistics for specific interfaces.

    • Traffic statistics for interfaces—Traffic statistics for specific interfaces.

    • Link status for interfaces—Includes link speed, state, and so on.

    • Queue status for interfaces—Queue status for specific interfaces.

    • Traffic status for interfaces—Traffic status for specific interfaces.

  • The analytics.proto file—Provides a template for the GBP stream format. This file can be used for writing your analytics server application. To download the file, go to:

    https://www.juniper.net/documentation/en_US/junos13.2/topics/reference/proto-files/analytics-proto.txt

  • Use of threshold values—The Analytics Manager (analyticsm) will generate a queue statistics record when the lower queue depth or latency threshold value is exceeded.

  • User Datagram Protocol (UDP)—Additional transport protocol you can configure, in addition to Transmission Control Protocol (TCP), for the remote streaming server port.

  • Single file for local logging—Replaces the separate log files for queue and traffic statistics.

  • Change in latency measurement—Configuration and reporting of latency values have changed from microseconds to nanoseconds.

  • Change in reporting of the collection time in UTC format—Statistics collection time is reported in microseconds instead of milliseconds.

  • New operational mode command show analytics collector—Replaces the show analytics streaming-server command.

  • Changes in command output format—Include the following changes:

    • Addition of unicast, multicast, and broadcast packet counters in queue and traffic statistics.

    • Reversal of the sequence of statistics information in the output. The most recent record is displayed at the beginning, and the oldest record at the end of the output.

    • Removal of traffic or queue monitoring status information from the global portion of the show analytics configuration and show analytics status command output if there is no global configuration.

    • Addition of n/a to the interface-specific portion of the show analytics configuration and show analytics status command output if a parameter is not configured (for example, depth threshold or latency threshold).

Summary of CLI Changes

Beginning in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15, enhancements to the network analytics feature result in changes in the CLI when you configure the feature. See Table 1 for a summary of CLI changes.

Table 1: Network Analytics CLI Changes

Task

CLI for Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D15 and 13.2X51-D10

CLI for Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 and later

Configuring global queue and traffic monitoring polling interval

[edit services analytics]

traffic-statistics {
interval interval;
}
queue-statistics {
interval interval;
}

[edit services analytics]

resource {
system {
polling-interval {
queue-monitoring interval;
traffic-monitoring interval;
}
}
}

Configuring local files for traffic and queue statistics reporting

[edit services analytics]

traffic-statistics {
file filename;
size size;
files number;
}
queue-statistics {
file filename;
size size;
files number;
}

[edit services analytics]

collector {
local {
file filename {
files number;
size size;
}
}
}

Enabling queue statistics and traffic monitoring, and specifying the depth threshold for all interfaces (globally)

[edit services analytics]

interfaces {
all {
queue-statistics;
traffic-statistics;
depth-threshold {
high number;
low number;
}
}
}

Requires defining a resource profile and applying it to the system:

  1. To define a resource profile:

    [edit services analytics]

    resource-profiles {
    profile-name{
    queue-monitoring;
    traffic-monitoring;
    depth-threshold {
    high number;
    low number;
    }
    }
    }
  2. To apply a profile to the system:

    [edit services analytics]

    resource {
    system {
    resource-profile profile-name;
    }
    }

Enabling queue statistics and traffic monitoring, and specifying the latency threshold for one interface

[edit services analytics]

interfaces {
interface{
queue-statistics;
traffic-statistics;
latency-threshold
high number;
low number;
}
}

Requires defining a resource profile and applying it to the interface:

  1. To define a resource profile:

    [edit services analytics]

    resource-profiles {
    profile-name{
    queue-monitoring;
    traffic-monitoring;
    latency-threshold {
    high number;
    low number;
    }
    }
    }
  2. To apply a profile to the interface:

    [edit services analytics]

    resource {
    interfaces {
    interface-name {
    resource-profile profile-name;
    }
    }
    }

Configuring the streaming data format (JSON, CSV, or TSV) to send to a remote server

Note: Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 added support for the GPB stream format and configuration of the transport protocols (TCP or UDP).

[edit services analytics]

streaming-servers {
address ip-address {
port number {
stream-format format;
}
}
}

Requires defining the stream format in an export profile and applying the profile to the collector.

  1. To configure the stream format:

    [edit services analytics]

    export-profiles {
    profile-name {
    stream-format format;
    }
    }
  2. To apply an export profile to the collector:

    [edit services analytics]

    collector {
    address ip-address {
    port number {
    transport protocol {
    export-profile profile-name;
    }
    }
    }
    }

Configuring the streaming message types (queue or traffic statistics) to send to a remote server

[edit services analytics]

streaming-servers {
address ip-address {
port number {
stream-type type;
stream-type type;
}
}
}

Requires defining an export profile and applying it to the collector:

  1. To define an export profile:

    [edit services analytics]

    export-profiles {
    profile-name {
    interface {
    information;
    statistics {
    queue;
    traffic;
    }
    status {
    link;
    queue;
    traffic;
    }
    }
    system {
    information;
    status {
    queue;
    traffic;
    }
    }
    }
    }
  2. To apply an export profile to the collector:

    [edit services analytics]

    collector {
    address ip-address {
    port number {
    export-profile profile-name;
    }
    }
    }

Configuring the transport protocol for sending streaming data to an external server

No configuration is available. Only the TCP protocol is supported.

Configuration is available. Both TCP and UDP protocols are supported, and can be configured for the same port.

[edit services analytics]

collector {
address ip-address {
port number1 {
transport tcp;
transport udp;
}
port number2 {
transport udp;
}
}
}

Show information about remote streaming server or collector

Issue the show analytics streaming-sever command.

Issue the show analytics collector command.

Understanding Enhanced Network Analytics Streaming Data

Network analytics monitoring data can be streamed to remote servers called collectors. You can configure one or more collectors to receive streamed data containing queue and traffic statistics. This topic describes the streamed data output.

Note

This topic applies to Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 or later.

Starting in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15, network analytics supports the following streaming data formats and output:

Google Protocol Buffer (GPB)

Support for the Google Protocol Buffer (GPB) streaming format has been added in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15. This streaming format provides:

  • Support for nine types of messages, based on resource type (system-wide or interface-specific).

  • Sends messages in a hierarchical format.

  • You can generate other stream format messages (JSON, CSV, TSV) from GPB formatted messages.

  • Includes a 8-byte message header. See Table 2 for more information.

Table 2 describes the GPB stream format message header.

Table 2: GPB Stream Format Message Header Information

Byte Position

Field

0 to 3

Length of message

4

Message version

5 to 7

Reserved for future use

The following GPB prototype file (analytics.proto) provides details about the streamed data:

JavaScript Object Notation (JSON)

The JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) streaming format supports the following data:

  • Queue statistics data. For example:

    See Table 3 for more information about queue statistics output fields.

  • Traffic statistics. For example:

    See Table 4 for more information about traffic statistics output fields.

Comma-separated Values (CSV)

The Comma-separated Values (CSV) streaming format supports the following data:

  • Queue statistics. For example:

    See Table 3 for more information about queue statistics output fields.

  • Traffic statistics. For example:

    See Table 4 for more information about traffic statistics output fields.

Tab-separated Values (TSV)

The Tab-separated Values (TSV) streaming format supports the following data:

  • Queue statistics. For example:

    See Table 3 for more information about queue statistics output fields.

  • Traffic statistics. For example:

    See Table 4 for more information about traffic statistics output fields.

Queue Statistics Output for JSON, CSV, and TSV

Table 3 describes the output fields for streamed queue statistics data in the order they appear.

Table 3: Streamed Queue Statistics Data Output Fields

Field

Description

record-type

Type of statistics. Displayed as:

  • queue-stats (JSON format)

  • q (CSV or TSV format)

time

Time (in Unix epoch format) at which the statistics were captured.

router-id

ID of the network analytics host device.

port

Name of the physical port configured for network analytics.

latency

Traffic queue latency in milliseconds.

queue depth

Depth of the traffic queue in bytes.

Traffic Statistics Output for JSON, CSV, and TSV

Table 4 describes the output fields for streamed traffic statistics data in the order they appear.

Table 4: Streamed Traffic Statistics Data Output Fields

Field

Description

record-type

Type of statistics. Displayed as:

  • traffic-stats (JSON format)

  • t (CSV or TSV format)

time

Time (in Unix epoch format) at which the statistics were captured.

router-id

ID of the network analytics host device.

port

Name of the physical port configured for network analytics.

rxpkt

Total packets received.

rxpps

Total packets received per second.

rxbyte

Total bytes received.

rxbps

Total bytes received per second.

rxdrop

Total incoming packets dropped.

rxerr

Total packets with errors.

txpkt

Total packets transmitted.

txpps

Total packets transmitted per second.

txbyte

Total bytes transmitted.

txbps

Total bytes transmitted per second.

txdrop

Total transmitted bytes dropped.

txerr

Total transmitted packets with errors (dropped).

Understanding Enhanced Analytics Local File Output

The network analytics feature provides visibility into the performance and behavior of the data center infrastructure. You enable network analytics by configuring queue or traffic statistics monitoring, or both. In addition, you can configure a local file for storing the traffic and queue statistics records.

Note

This topic describes the local file output in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 and later.

Beginning in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15, the traffic and queue monitoring statistics can be stored locally in a single file. The following example shows the output from the monitor start command.

root@qfx5100-33> monitor start an

See Table 5 for queue statistics output, and Table 6 for traffic statistics output. The fields in the tables are listed in the order they appear in the output example.

Table 5: Output Fields for Queue Statistics in Local Analytics File

Field

Description

Example in Output

Record type

Type of statistics (queue or traffic monitoring)

q

Time (microseconds)

Unix epoch (or Unix time) in microseconds at which the statistics were captured.

1393947567698432

Router ID

ID of the network analytics host device.

qfx5100-33

Port

Name of the physical port configured for network analytics.

xe-0/0/19

Latency (nanoseconds)

Traffic queue latency in nanoseconds.

1098572

Queue depth (bytes)

Depth of the traffic queue in bytes.

1373216

Table 6: Output Fields for Traffic Statistics in Local Analytics File

Field

Description

Example in Output

Record type

Type of statistics (queue or traffic monitoring)

t

Time (microseconds)

Unix epoch (or Unix time) in microseconds at which the statistics were captured.

1393947569874528

Router ID

ID of the network analytics host device.

qfx5100-33

Port

Name of the physical port configured for network analytics.

xe-0/0/16

rxpkt

Total packets received.

12603371884

rxucpkt

Total unicast packets received.

12603371884

rxmcpkt

Total multicast packets received.

0

rxbcpkt

Total broadcast packets received.

0

rxpps

Total packets received per second.

8426023

rxbyte

Total octets received.

1613231610488

rxbps

Total bytes received per second.

8628248712

rxdroppkt

Total incoming packets dropped.

0

rxcrcerr

CRC/Align errors received.

3

txpkt

Total packets transmitted.

5916761

txucpkt

Total unicast packets transmitted.

5916761

txmcpkt

Total multicast packets transmitted.

0

txbcpkt

Total broadcast packets transmitted.

0

txpps

Total packets transmitted per second.

0

txbyte

Total octets transmitted.

757345408

txbps

Bytes per second transmitted.

0

txdroppkt

Total transmitted packets dropped.

0

txcrcerr

CRC/Align errors transmitted.

0

Understanding Network Analytics Streaming Data

This topic describes the network analytics queue and traffic statistics that are streamed to remote servers.

You can configure one or more remote servers to receive streamed data containing queue and traffic statistics. The format of the streamed data can be Javascript Object Notation (JSON), Comma-separated Values (CSV), or Tab-separated Values (TSV).

Note

The output shown in this topic applies to Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D10 only. The time is displayed in the Unix epoch format (also known as Unix time or POSIX time).

The following examples show the streamed queue statistics data output in different formats.

  • JSON format:

  • CSV format:

  • TSV format:

Table 7 describes the output fields for streamed queue statistics data in the order they appear.

Table 7: Streamed Queue Statistics Data Output Fields

Field

Description

record-type

Type of statistics. Displayed as:

  • queue-stats (JSON format)

  • q (CSV or TSV format)

time

Time (in Unix epoch format) at which the statistics were captured.

router-id

ID of the network analytics host device.

port

Name of the physical port configured for network analytics.

latency

Traffic queue latency in milliseconds.

queue depth

Depth of the traffic queue in bytes.

The following examples show the streamed traffic statistics data output in different formats.

  • JSON format:

  • CSV format:

  • TSV format:

Table 8 describes the output fields for streamed traffic statistics data in the order they appear.

Table 8: Streamed Traffic Statistics Data Output Fields

Field

Description

record-type

Type of statistics. Displayed as:

  • traffic-stats (JSON format)

  • t (CSV or TSV format)

time

Time (in Unix epoch format) at which the statistics were captured.

router-id

ID of the network analytics host device.

port

Name of the physical port configured for network analytics.

rxpkt

Total packets received.

rxpps

Total packets received per second.

rxbyte

Total bytes received.

rxbps

Total bits received per second.

rxdrop

Total incoming packets dropped.

rxerr

Total packets with errors.

txpkt

Total packets transmitted.

txpps

Total packets transmitted per second.

txbyte

Total bytes transmitted.

txbps

Total bytes transmitted per second.

txdrop

Total transmitted bytes dropped.

txerr

Total transmitted packets with errors (dropped).

Understanding Network Analytics Configuration and Status

The network analytics feature provides visibility into the performance and behavior of the data center infrastructure. You can enable network analytics by configuring traffic and queue statistics monitoring.

Note

This topic describes the configuration and status output from Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D15 and 13.2X51-D10 only.

If you had enabled traffic or queue monitoring, you can issue the show analytics configuration and show analytics status commands to view the global interface configuration and status and that of specific interfaces. The output that is displayed depends on your configuration at the global interface and specific interface levels. For example:

  • A global interface configuration (for all interfaces) to disable monitoring supersedes the configuration to enable it on an interface.

  • The interface configuration to enable or disable monitoring supersedes the global interface configuration, unless monitoring had been disabled globally for all interfaces.

  • If there is no configuration, whether for all interfaces or a specific interface, monitoring is disabled by default (see Table 9).

Table 9 describes the correlation between the user configuration and the settings that are displayed.

Table 9: Configuration and Status Output in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D10 and 13.2X50-D15

User Configuration

Global or System Settings

Specific Interface Settings

Configuration

Status

Configuration

Status

No global or specific interface configuration. This is the default setting.

Auto

Auto

Auto

Disabled

No global interface configuration but the specific interface monitoring is disabled.

Auto

Auto

Disabled

Disabled

No global interface configuration but the specific interface monitoring is enabled.

Auto

Auto

Enabled

Enabled

Monitoring is disabled globally and there is no interface configuration.

Disabled

Disabled

Auto

Disabled

Monitoring is disabled at both the global and specific interface levels.

Disabled

Disabled

Disabled

Disabled

Monitoring is disabled at the global interface level but is enabled at the specific interface level. The global interface Disabled setting supersedes the Enabled setting for a specific interface.

Disabled

Disabled

Enabled

Disabled

Monitoring is enabled for all interfaces but there is no configuration for the specific interface .

Enabled

Enabled

Auto

Enabled

Monitoring is enabled at both the global and specific interface levels.

Enabled

Enabled

Enabled

Enabled

Monitoring is enabled for all interfaces but is disabled for the specific interface.

Enabled

Enabled

Disabled

Disabled

Prototype File for the Google Protocol Buffer Stream Format

The Google Protocol Buffer (GBP) stream format is used for streaming monitoring statistics data to a remote collector in a single AnRecord message.

The analytics.proto file provides a template for the GBP stream format. This file can be used for writing your analytics server application.

To download the GPB prototype file, go to:

https://www.juniper.net/documentation/en_US/junos13.2/topics/reference/proto-files/analytics-proto.txt

Configuring Queue Monitoring

Network analytics queue monitoring provides visibility into the performance and behavior of the data center infrastructure. This feature collects data from the switch, analyzes the data using sophisticated algorithms, and captures the results in reports. You can use the reports to help troubleshoot problems, make decisions, and adjust resources as needed.

You enable queue monitoring by first defining a resource profile template, and then applying the profile to the system (for a global configuration) or to individual interfaces.

Note

You can configure queue monitoring on physical network interfaces only; logical interfaces and Virtual Chassis physical (VCP) interfaces are not supported.

Note

The procedure to configure queue monitoring on a QFX Series standalone switch requires Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 or later to be installed on your device.

To configure queue monitoring on a QFX Series standalone switch:

  1. Configure the queue monitoring polling interval (in milliseconds) globally (for the system):
  2. Configure a resource profile for the system, and enable queue monitoring:
  3. Configure high and low values of the depth-threshold (in bytes) for queue monitoring in the system profile:

    For both high and low values, the range is from 1 to 1,250,000,000 bytes, and the default value is 0 bytes.

    Note

    You can configure either the depth-threshold or latency threshold for the system, but not both.

  4. Apply the resource profile template to the system for a global configuration:
  5. Configure an interface-specific resource profile and enable queue monitoring for the interface:
  6. Configure the latency-threshold (high and low values) for queue monitoring in the interface-specific profile:

    For both high and low values, the range is from 1 to 100,000,000 nanoseconds, and the default value is 1,000,000 nanoseconds.

    Note

    You can configure either the depth-threshold or latency threshold for interfaces, but not both.

  7. Apply the resource profile template for interfaces to one or more interfaces:
    Note

    If a conflict arises between the system and interface configurations, the interface-specific configuration supersedes the global (system) configuration.

Configuring Traffic Monitoring

Network analytics queue monitoring provides visibility into the performance and behavior of the data center infrastructure. This feature collects data from the switch, analyzes the data using sophisticated algorithms, and captures the results in reports. You can use the reports to help troubleshoot problems, make decisions, and adjust resources as needed.

You enable traffic monitoring by first defining a resource profile template, and then applying the profile to the system (for a global configuration) or to individual interfaces.

Note

You can configure traffic monitoring on physical network interfaces only; logical interfaces and Virtual Chassis physical (VCP) interfaces are not supported.

Note

The procedure to configure traffic monitoring on a QFX Series standalone switch requires Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 or later to be installed on your device.

To configure traffic monitoring on a QFX Series standalone switch:

  1. Configure the traffic monitoring polling interval (in seconds) for the system:
  2. Configure a resource profile for the system, and enable traffic monitoring in the profile:
  3. Apply the resource profile to the system for a global configuration:
  4. Configure a resource profile for interfaces, and enable traffic monitoring in the profile:
    Note

    If a conflict arises between the system and interface configurations, the interface-specific configuration supersedes the global (system) configuration.

  5. Apply the resource profile template to one or more interfaces:

Configuring a Local File for Network Analytics Data

The network analytics feature provides visibility into the performance and behavior of the data center infrastructure. This feature collects data from the switch, analyzes the data using sophisticated algorithms, and captures the results in reports. Network administrators can use the reports to help troubleshoot problems, make decisions, and adjust resources as needed.

To save the queue and traffic statistics data in a local file, you must configure a filename to store it.

Note

The procedure to configure a local file for storing queue and traffic monitoring statistics requires Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 or later to be installed on your device.

To configure a local file for storing queue and traffic monitoring statistics:

  1. Configure a filename:

    There is no default filename. If you do not configure a filename, network analytics statistics are not saved locally.

  2. Configure the number of files (from 2 to 1000 files):
  3. Configure the file size (from 10 to 4095 MB) in the format of xm:

Configuring a Remote Collector for Streaming Analytics Data

The network analytics feature provides visibility into the performance and behavior of the data center infrastructure. This feature collects data from the switch, analyzes the data using sophisticated algorithms, and captures the results in reports. Network administrators can use the reports to help troubleshoot problems, make decisions, and adjust resources as needed.

You can configure an export profile to define the stream format and type of data, and one or more remote servers (collectors) to receive streaming network analytics data.

Note

The procedure to configure a collector for receiving streamed analytics data requires Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 or later to be installed on your device.

To configure a collector for receiving streamed analytics data:

  1. Create an export profile and specify the stream format:
  2. Configure the export profile to include interface information:
  3. Configure the export profile to include interface queue statistics:
  4. Configure the export profile to include interface traffic statistics:
  5. Configure the export profile to include interface status link information:
  6. Configure the export profile to include system information:
  7. Configure the export profile to include system queue status:
  8. Configure the export profile to include system traffic status:
  9. Configure the transport protocol for the collector addresses and apply the export profile:
    Note

    If you configure the tcp or udp option for the JSON, CSV, and TSV formats, you must also set up the TCP or UDP client software on the remote collector to process records that are separated by the newline character (\n) on the remote server.

    If you configure the tcp or udp option for the GPB format, you must also set up the TCP or UDP build streaming server using the analytics.proto file.

Example: Configuring Network Analytics

This example shows how to configure network analytics which includes queue and traffic monitoring on a QFX3500 standalone switch.

Note

The configuration shown in this example is supported only on Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D15 and 13.2X51-D10.

Requirements

This example uses the following hardware and software components:

  • A QFX3500 standalone switch

  • A external streaming server to collect data

  • Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D15 software

  • TCP server software (for remote streaming servers)

Before you configure network analytics, be sure you have:

  • Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D15 or later software installed and running on the QFX3500 switch

  • (Optional for streaming servers) TCP server software set up for processing records separated by a newline character (\n) on the remote streaming server

  • All other devices running

Overview

The network analytics feature provides visibility into the performance and behavior of the data center infrastructure. This feature collects data from the switch, analyzes the data using sophisticated algorithms, and captures the results in reports. Network administrators can use the reports to help troubleshoot problems, make decisions, and adjust resources as needed. You can enable network analytics by configuring queue and traffic statistics monitoring.

Topology

In this example, the QFX3500 switch is connected to an external server used for streaming statistics data.

Configuration

To configure network analytics, perform these tasks:

CLI Quick Configuration

To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them in a text file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network configuration, and then copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level.

Configuring Queue and Traffic Statistics Monitoring

Step-by-Step Procedure

To configure queue and traffic monitoring on physical interfaces:

Note

You can configure queue and traffic monitoring on physical network interfaces only; logical interfaces and Virtual Chassis physical (VCP) interfaces are not supported.

Note

Disabling of the queue or traffic monitoring supersedes the configuration (enabling) of this feature. You disable monitoring by issuing the no-queue-statistics or no-traffic-statistics at the [edit services analytics interfaces] hierarchy level.

  1. Configure all interfaces for queue monitoring and set the latency thresholds (in microseconds):
  2. Configure one interface for traffic monitoring:

Configuring Local Statistics Files

Step-by-Step Procedure

To configure local statistics files:

  1. Configure the number of queue statistics files, and each file size in MB:
  2. Configure the queue statistics collection interval in milliseconds
  3. Configure the number of traffic statistics files, and each file size in MB:
  4. Configure the traffic statistics collection interval in seconds:

Configuring Streaming Servers

Step-by-Step Procedure

To configure streaming servers for receiving monitoring data:

Note

In addition to configuring streaming servers, you must also set up the TCP client software to process records that are separated by the newline character (\n) on the remote server.

  1. Configure a server IP address and port for queue statistics monitoring:
  2. Configure a server IP address and port for traffic statistics monitoring:

Results

Display the results of the configuration:

Verification

Confirm that the configuration is correct and works as expected by performing these tasks:

Verifying the Network Analytics Configuration

Purpose

Verify the configuration for network analytics.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show analytics configuration command to display the traffic and queue monitoring configuration.

user@host> show analytics configuration

Meaning

The output displays information about traffic and queue monitoring on the switch.

Verifying the Network Analytics Status

Purpose

Verify the network analytics operational status of the switch.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show analytics status command to display the traffic and queue monitoring status.

user@host> show analytics status

Verifying Streaming Servers Configuration

Purpose

Verify the configuration for streaming data to remote servers is working.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show analytics streaming-servers command to display the streaming servers configuration.

user@host> show analytics streaming-servers

Meaning

The output displays information about the remote streaming server.

Verifying Queue Statistics

Purpose

Verify that queue statistics collection is working.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show analytics queue-statistics command to display the queue statistics.

user@host> show analytics queue-statistics

Meaning

The output displays queue-statistics information as expected.

Verifying Traffic Statistics

Purpose

Verify that traffic statistics collection is working.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show analytics traffic-statistics command to display the traffic statistics.

user@host> show analytics traffic-statistics

Meaning

The output displays traffic-statistics information as expected.

Example: Configuring Enhanced Network Analytics Features

This example shows how to configure the enhanced network analytics feature, including queue and traffic monitoring.

Requirements

This example uses the following hardware and software components:

  • A QFX5100 standalone switch

  • A external streaming server to collect data

  • Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 software

  • TCP server software (for remote streaming servers)

Before you configure network analytics, be sure you have:

  • Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 or later software installed and running on the QFX5100 switch.

  • (Optional for streaming servers for the JSON, CSV, and TSV formats) TCP or UDP server software set up for processing records separated by a newline character (\n) on the remote streaming server.

  • (Optional for streaming servers for the GPB format) TCP or UDP build streaming server using the analytics.proto file.

  • All other network devices running.

Overview

The network analytics feature provides visibility into the performance and behavior of the data center infrastructure. This feature collects data from the switch, analyzes the data using sophisticated algorithms, and captures the results in reports. Network administrators can use the reports to help troubleshoot problems, make decisions, and adjust resources as needed.

You enable network analytics by first defining a resource profile template, and then applying the profile to the system (for a global configuration) or to individual interfaces.

Note

You can configure queue and traffic monitoring on physical network interfaces only; logical interfaces and Virtual Chassis physical (VCP) interfaces are not supported.

Disabling of the queue or traffic monitoring supersedes the configuration (enabling) of this feature. You disable monitoring by applying a resource profile that includes the no-queue-monitoring or no-traffic-monitoring configuration statement at the [edit services analytics resource-profiles] hierarchy level.

Topology

In this example, the QFX5100 switch is connected to an external server used for streaming statistics data.

Configuration

To configure the network analytics features, perform these tasks:

CLI Quick Configuration

To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them in a text file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network configuration, and then copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level.

Configuring the Polling Interval for Queue and Traffic Monitoring

Step-by-Step Procedure

To configure the polling interval queue and traffic monitoring globally:

  1. Configure the queue monitoring polling interval (in milliseconds) for the system:
  2. Configure the traffic monitoring polling interval (in seconds) for the system:

Configuring a Local Statistics File

Step-by-Step Procedure

To configure a file for local statistics collection:

  1. Configure the filename:
  2. Configure the number of files:
  3. Configure the file size:

Configuring and Applying a Resource Profile for the System

Step-by-Step Procedure

To define a resource profile template for queue and traffic monitoring resources:

  1. Configure a resource profile and enable queue monitoring:
  2. Enable traffic monitoring in the profile:
  3. Configure the depth-threshold (high and low values) for queue monitoring in the profile:
  4. Apply the resource profile template to the system resource type for a global configuration:

Configuring and Applying a Resource Profile for an Interface

Step-by-Step Procedure

You can configure queue and traffic monitoring for one or more specific interfaces. The interface-specific configuration supersedes the global (system) configuration. To define a resource profile template for queue and traffic monitoring resources for an interface:

  1. Configure a resource profile and enable queue monitoring:
  2. Enable traffic monitoring in the profile:
  3. Configure the latency-threshold (high and low values) for queue monitoring in the profile:
  4. Apply the resource profile template to the interfaces resource type for specific interfaces:

Configuring an Export Profile and Collector for Streaming Data

Step-by-Step Procedure

To configure a collector (streaming server) for receiving monitoring data:

  1. Create an export profile and specify the stream format:
  2. Configure the export profile to include interface information:
  3. Configure the export profile to include interface queue statistics:
  4. Configure the export profile to include interface traffic statistics:
  5. Configure the export profile to include interface status link information:
  6. Configure the export profile to include system information:
  7. Configure the export profile to include system queue status:
  8. Configure the export profile to include system traffic status:
  9. Configure the transport protocol for the collector addresses and apply an export profile:
    Note

    If you configure the tcp or udp option for the JSON, CSV, and TSV formats, you must also set up the TCP or UDP client software on the remote collector to process records that are separated by the newline character (\n) on the remote server.

    If you configure the tcp or udp option for the GPB format, you must also set up the TCP or UDP build streaming server using the analytics.proto file.

Results

Display the results of the configuration:

Verification

Confirm that the configuration is correct and works as expected by performing these tasks:

Verifying the Network Analytics Configuration

Purpose

Verify the configuration for network analytics.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show analytics configuration command to display the traffic and queue monitoring configuration.

user@host> show analytics configuration

Meaning

The output displays the traffic and queue monitoring configuration information on the switch.

Verifying the Network Analytics Status

Purpose

Verify the network analytics operational status of the switch.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show analytics status global command to display global traffic and queue monitoring status.

user@host> show analytics status global

From operational mode, enter the show analytics status command to display both the interface and global queue monitoring status.

user@host> show analytics status

Meaning

The output displays the global and interface status of traffic and queue monitoring on the switch.

Verifying the Collector Configuration

Purpose

Action

Verify the configuration for the collector for streamed data is working.

From operational mode, enter the show analytics collector command to display the streaming servers configuration.

user@host> show analytics collector

Meaning

The output displays the collector configuration.

Note

The connection state of a port configured with the udp transport protocol is always displayed as n/a.

Verifying Queue Statistics

Purpose

Verify that queue statistics collection is working.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show analytics queue-statistics command to display the queue statistics.

user@host> show analytics queue-statistics

Meaning

The output displays queue-statistics information, with the latest record at the top of the report.

Verifying Traffic Statistics

Purpose

Verify that traffic statistics collection is working.

Action

From operational mode, enter the show analytics traffic-statistics command to display the traffic statistics.

user@host> show analytics traffic-statistics

Meaning

The output displays traffic-statistics information.

Release History Table
Release
Description
In Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15, the network analytics feature was enhanced, and extensive changes were made to the CLI statements and hierarchies.
Beginning in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15, the network analytics feature provides the following enhancements:
Beginning in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15, enhancements to the network analytics feature result in changes in the CLI when you configure the feature.
Starting in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15, network analytics supports the following streaming data formats and output:
Beginning in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15, the traffic and queue monitoring statistics can be stored locally in a single file.
The procedure to configure queue monitoring on a QFX Series standalone switch requires Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 or later to be installed on your device.
The procedure to configure traffic monitoring on a QFX Series standalone switch requires Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 or later to be installed on your device.
The procedure to configure a local file for storing queue and traffic monitoring statistics requires Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 or later to be installed on your device.
The procedure to configure a collector for receiving streamed analytics data requires Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 or later to be installed on your device.