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Device Monitoring

 

Monitoring System Properties

Purpose

View system properties such as the name, IP address, and resource usage.

Action

To monitor system properties in the CLI, enter the following commands:

Meaning

Table 1 summarizes key output fields in the system properties display.

Table 1: Summary of Key System Properties Output Fields

Field

Values

Additional Information

General Information

Serial Number

Serial number of device.

 

Junos OS Version

Version of Junos OS active on the switch, including whether the software is for domestic or export use.

Export software is for use outside the USA and Canada.

Hostname

Name of the device.

 

IP Address

IP address of the device.

 

Loopback Address

Loopback address.

 

Domain Name Server

Address of the domain name server.

 

Time Zone

Time zone on the device.

 
Time

Current Time

Current system time, in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).

 

System Booted Time

Date and time when the device was last booted and how long it has been running.

 

Protocol Started Time

Date and time when the protocols were last started and how long they have been running.

 

Last Configured Time

Date and time when a configuration was last committed. This field also shows the name of the user who issued the last commit command.

 

Load Average

CPU load average for 1, 5, and 15 minutes.

 
Storage Media

Internal Flash Memory

Usage details of internal flash memory.

 

External Flash Memory

Usage details of external USB flash memory.

 
Logged in Users Details

User

Username of any user logged in to the switch.

 

Terminal

Terminal through which the user is logged in.

 

From

System from which the user has logged in. A hyphen indicates that the user is logged in through the console.

 

Login Time

Time when the user logged in.

This is the user@switch field in show system users command output.

Idle Time

How long the user has been idle.

 

Monitoring System Process Information

Purpose

View the processes running on the device.

Action

To view the software processes running on the device:

Meaning

Table 2 summarizes the output fields in the system process information display.

The display includes the total CPU load and total memory utilization.

Table 2: Summary of System Process Information Output Fields

Field

Values

PID

Identifier of the process.

Name

Owner of the process.

State

Current state of the process.

CPU Load

Percentage of the CPU that is being used by the process.

Memory Utilization

Amount of memory that is being used by the process.

Start Time

Time of day when the process started.

Monitoring Interfaces

Purpose

View general information about all physical and logical interfaces for a device.

Action

Enter the following show commands in the CLI to view interface status and traffic statistics.

  • show interfaces terse

    Note

    On SRX Series devices, when configuring identical IPs on a single interface, you will not see a warning message; instead, you will see a syslog message.

  • show interfaces extensive

  • show interfacesinterface-name

Note

If you are using the J-Web user interfaces, select Monitor>Interfaces in the J-Web user interface. The J-Web Interfaces page displays the following details about each device interface:

  • Port—Indicates the interface name.

  • Admin Status—Indicates whether the interface is enabled (Up) or disabled (Down).

  • Link Status—Indicates whether the interface is linked (Up) or not linked (Down).

  • Address—Indicates the IP address of the interface.

  • Zone—Indicates whether the zone is an untrust zone or a trust zone.

  • Services—Indicates services that are enabled on the device, such as HTTP and SSH.

  • Protocols—Indicates protocols that are enabled on the device, such as BGP and IGMP.

  • Input Rate graph—Displays interface bandwidth utilization. Input rates are shown in bytes per second.

  • Output Rate graph—Displays interface bandwidth utilization. Output rates are shown in bytes per second.

  • Error Counters chart—Displays input and output error counters in the form of a bar chart.

  • Packet Counters chart—Displays the number of broadcast, unicast, and multicast packet counters in the form of a pie chart. (Packet counter charts are supported only for interfaces that support MAC statistics.)

To change the interface display, use the following options:

  • Port for FPC—Controls the member for which information is displayed.

  • Start/Stop button—Starts or stops monitoring the selected interfaces.

  • Show Graph—Displays input and output packet counters and error counters in the form of charts.

  • Pop-up button—Displays the interface graphs in a separate pop-up window.

  • Details—Displays extensive statistics about the selected interface, including its general status, traffic information, IP address, I/O errors, class-of-service data, and statistics.

  • Refresh Interval—Indicates the duration of time after which you want the data on the page to be refreshed.

  • Clear Statistics—Clears the statistics for the selected interface.

Other Tools to Configure and Monitor Devices Running Junos OS

Starting in Junos OS Release 15.1, apart from the command-line interface, Junos OS also supports the following applications, scripts, and utilities that enable you to configure and monitor devices running Junos OS:

  • Junos XML Management Protocol Application Programming Interface (API)—Application programmers can use the Junos XML Management Protocol API to monitor and configure Juniper Networks devices. Juniper Networks provides a Perl module with the API to help you more quickly and easily develop custom Perl scripts for configuring and monitoring the devices.

  • NETCONF Application Programming Interface (API)—Application programmers can also use the NETCONF API to monitor and configure Juniper Networks devices.

  • Junos OS commit scripts—You can define scripts to enforce custom configuration tasks, enforce consistency, prevent common mistakes, and more. Every time you commit a new candidate configuration, the active commit scripts are called to inspect the new candidate configuration. If a configuration violates your custom rules, the script can instruct the Junos OS to perform various actions, including making changes to the configuration and generating custom, warning, and system log messages.

  • Junos OS Op scripts—You can add your own commands to the operation-mode CLI. You can use these scripts to automate troubleshooting of known network problems and correct them.

  • Junos OS event scripts—You can use event scripts to diagnose and fix issues, monitor the overall status of the system, and examine errors periodically. Event scripts are similar to op scripts except that certain events on the switch will trigger these scripts.

  • CHEF—You can use CHEF automate the provisioning and management of compute, networking, and storage resources. Chef for Junos OS provides support for Chef on selected Junos OS devices, allowing you to automate common switching network configurations.

  • Puppet—You can use PUPPET for configuration management. Puppet provides an efficient and scalable solution for managing the configurations of large numbers of devices. System administrators take advantage of Puppet to manage compute resources such as physical and virtual servers.

Release History Table
Release
Description
Starting in Junos OS Release 15.1, apart from the command-line interface, Junos OS also supports the following applications, scripts, and utilities that enable you to configure and monitor devices running Junos OS: