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Configuring Tunnel Interfaces

 

Tunnel Interface Configuration on MX Series Routers Overview

Because MX Series routers do not support Tunnel Services PICs, you create tunnel interfaces on MX Series routers by including the following statements at the [edit chassis] hierarchy level:

Where:

fpc slot-number is the slot number of the DPC, MPC, or MIC. On the MX80 router, possible values are 0 and 1. On other MX Series routers, if two SCBs are installed, the range is 0 through 11. If three SCBs are installed, the range is 0 through 5 and 7 through 11.

pic number is the slot number of the PIC. On MX80 routers, if the FPC is 0, the PIC number can only be 0. If the FPC is 1, the PIC range is 0 through 3. For all other MX Series routers, the range is 0 through 3.

bandwidth (1g | 10g | 20g | 30g | 40g | 50g | 60g | 70g | 80g | 90g | 100g) is the maximum amount of bandwidth, in gigabits, that is available for tunnel traffic on each Packet Forwarding Engine. For MPCs and MICs, this bandwidth is not reserved for tunnel traffic and can be shared by the network interfaces. For DPCs, this bandwidth is reserved and cannot be shared by the network interfaces.

Note

When you use MPCs and MICs, tunnel interfaces are soft interfaces and allow as much traffic as the forwarding-path allows, so it is advantageous to set up tunnel services without artificially limiting traffic by use of the bandwidth option. However, you must specify bandwidth when configuring tunnel services for MX Series routers with DPCs or FPCs. The GRE key option is not supported on the tunnel interfaces for DPCs on MX960 routers.

If you specify a bandwidth that is not compatible, tunnel services are not activated. For example, you cannot specify a bandwidth of 1 Gbps for a Packet Forwarding Engine on a 10-Gigabit Ethernet 4-port DPC.

When you configure tunnel interfaces on the Packet Forwarding Engine of a 10-Gigabit Ethernet 4-port DPC, the Ethernet interfaces for that port are removed from service and are no longer visible in the command-line interface (CLI). The Packet Forwarding Engine of a 10-Gigabit Ethernet 4-port DPC supports either tunnel interfaces or Ethernet interfaces, but not both. Each port on the 10-Gigabit Ethernet 4-port DPC includes two LEDs, one for tunnel services and one for Ethernet services, to indicate which type of service is being used. On the Gigabit Ethernet 40-port DPC, you can configure both tunnel and Ethernet interfaces at the same time.

To verify that the tunnel interfaces have been created, issue the show interfaces terse operational mode command. For more information, see the CLI Explorer. The bandwidth that you specify determines the port number of the tunnel interfaces that are created. When you specify a bandwidth of 1g, the port number is always 10. When you specify any other bandwidth, the port number is always 0.

Note

When the tunnel bandwidth is unspecified in the Routing Engine CLI, the maximum tunnel bandwidth for an MPC3E is 60G.

Note

You cannot configure ingress queueing and tunnel services on the same MPC because doing so causes PFE forwarding to stop. You can configure and use each feature separately.

Configuring Tunnel Interfaces on an MX Series Router with a 16x10GE 3D MPC

MX960, MX480, and M240 routers support the 16-port 10-Gigabit Ethernet MPC (16x10GE 3D MPC) fixed configuration Field Replaceable Unit (FRU). Each Packet Forwarding Engine on a 16x10GE MPC can support a full-duplex 10Gbps tunnel without losing line-rate capacity. For example, a full-duplex 10Gbps tunnel can be hosted on a 10-Gigabit-Ethernet port, while two other 10-Gigabit-Ethernet ports on the same PFE can concurrently forward line-rate traffic.

To configure an MPC and its corresponding Packet Forwarding Engine to use tunneling services, include the tunnel-services statement at the [edit chassis fpc slot-number pic pic-number] hierarchy level. The Junos OS creates tunnel interfaces gr-fpc/pic/port.0, vt-fpc/pic/port.0, and so on. You also configure the amount of bandwidth reserved for tunnel services.

fpc slot-number is the slot number of the MPC. If two SCBs are installed, the range is 0 through 11. If three SCBs are installed, the range is 0 through 5 and 7 through 11.

pic number is the number of the Packet Forwarding Engine on the MPC. The range is 0 through 3.

bandwidth 10g is the amount of bandwidth to reserve for tunnel traffic on each Packet Forwarding Engine.

In the following example, you create tunnel interfaces on Packet Forwarding Engine 0 of MPC 4 with 10 Gbps of bandwidth reserved for tunnel traffic. With this configuration, the tunnel interfaces created are gr-4/0/0, pe-4/0/0, pd-4/0/0, vt-4/0/0, and so on.

Configuring Tunnel Interfaces on MX Series Routers with the MPC3E

Because the MX Series routers do not support Tunnel Services PICs, you create tunnel interfaces on MX Series routers by including the following statements at the [edit chassis] hierarchy level:

fpc slot-number is the slot number of the DPC, MPC, or MIC. On the MX80 router, the range is 0 through 1. On other MX series routers, if two SCBs are installed, the range is 0 through 11. If three SCBs are installed, the range is 0 through 5 and 7 through 11.

The pic number On MX80 routers, if the FPC is 0, the PIC number can only be 0. If the FPC is 1, the PIC range is 0 through 3. For all other MX series routers, the range is 0 through 3.

bandwidth (1g | 10g | 20g | 40g) is the amount of bandwidth to reserve for tunnel traffic on each Packet Forwarding Engine.

Note

When you use MPCs and MICs, tunnel interfaces are soft interfaces and allow as much traffic as the forwarding-path allows, so it is advantageous to setup tunnel services without artificially limiting traffic by use of the bandwidth option. However, you must specify bandwidth when configuring tunnel services for MX Series routers with DPCs or FPCs.

1g indicates that 1 gigabit per second of bandwidth is reserved for tunnel traffic.

10g indicates that 10 gigabits per second of bandwidth is reserved for tunnel traffic.

20g indicates that 20 gigabits per second of bandwidth is reserved for tunnel traffic.

40g indicates that 40 gigabits per second of bandwidth is reserved for tunnel traffic.

If you specify a bandwidth that is not compatible, tunnel services are not activated. For example, you cannot specify a bandwidth of 1 Gbps for a Packet Forwarding Engine on a 10-Gigabit Ethernet 4-port DPC.

To verify that the tunnel interfaces have been created, issue the show interfaces terse operational mode command. For more information, see the CLI Explorer. The bandwidth that you specify determines the port number of the tunnel interfaces that are created. When you specify a bandwidth of 1g, the port number is always 10. When you specify any other bandwidth, the port number is always 0.

See also

Example: Configuring Tunnel Interfaces on the MPC3E

Requirements for Configuration of Tunnel Interfaces on the MPC3E

This example requires MX Series routers with the MPC3E.

Ethernet Tunnel Configuration Overview

MX Series routers do not support Tunnel Services PICs. However, you can create one set of tunnel interfaces per pic slot up to a maximum of 4 slots from 0-3 on MX Series routers with the MPC3E.

To configure the tunnels, include the tunnel-services statement and an optional bandwidth of (1g | 10g | 20g | 30g | 40g) at the [edit chassis] hierarchy level.

Note

When no tunnel bandwidth is specified, the tunnel interface can have a maximum bandwidth of up to 60Gbps.

Note

A MIC need not be plugged in to the MPC3E to configure a tunnel interface.

Configuring a 20-Gigabit Ethernet Tunnel

Step-by-Step Procedure

In the following example, you create tunnel interfaces on PIC-slot 1 of MPC 0 with 20 gigabit per second of bandwidth reserved for tunnel traffic. With this configuration, the tunnel interfaces created are gr-0/1/0, pe-0/1/0, pd-0/1/0, vt-0/1/0, and so on.

  1. To create a 20 gigabit per second tunnel interface, use the following configuration:

Configuring a Tunnel With Unspecified Bandwidth

Step-by-Step Procedure

In the following example, you create a tunnel interface on PIC-slot 3 of MPC 0 with no bandwidth specified. The tunnel traffic can carry up to a maximum of 60Gbps depending on other trafiic through the packet forwarding engine. With this configuration, the tunnel interfaces created are gr-0/3/0, pe-0/3/0, pd-0/3/0, vt-0/3/0, and so on.

  1. To create a tunnel interface with no bandwidth specification, use the following configuration:

Configuring Tunnel Interfaces on MX Series Routers with MPC4E

MX Series routers do not support Tunnel Services PICs. However, you can create a set of tunnel interfaces per PIC slot up to a maximum of four slots from 0 through 3 on MX Series routers with MPC4E.

To configure the tunnel interfaces, include the tunnel-services statement and an optional bandwidth of (1g | 10g | 20g | 30g | 40g) at the [edit chassis] hierarchy level. When no tunnel bandwidth is specified, the tunnel interface can have a maximum bandwidth of up to 60 Gbps.

To verify that the tunnel interfaces have been created, issue the show interfaces terse operational mode command. For more information, see the CLI Explorer. The bandwidth that you specify determines the port number of the tunnel interfaces that are created. When you specify a bandwidth of 1g, the port number is always 10. When you specify any other bandwidth, the port number is always 0.

In the following example, you create tunnel interfaces on PIC 1 of MPC 4 with 40 Gbps of bandwidth reserved for tunnel traffic. fpc slot-number is the slot number of the MPC. In this configuration, the tunnel interfaces created are gr-4/1/1, pe-4/1/1, pd-4/1/1, vt-4/1/1, and so on.

  1. To create a 40-Gbps tunnel interface, use the following configuration:

Configuring Tunnel Interfaces on MX Series Routers with MPC7E-MRATE/MPC7E-10G

MPCs support a total of four inline tunnels per MPC, one per PIC. You can create a set of tunnel interfaces per PIC slot up to a maximum of four slots from 0 through 3

To configure the tunnel interfaces, include the tunnel-services statement and an optional bandwidth of 1 Gbps through 120Gbps at the [edit chassis fpc fpc-slot pic number] hierarchy level. If you do not specify the tunnel bandwidth then, the tunnel interface can have a maximum bandwidth of up to 120 Gbps.

To verify that the tunnel interfaces have been created, issue the show interfaces terse operational mode command. For more information, see the CLI Explorer.

In the following example, you create tunnel interfaces on PIC 1 of MPC 5 with 40 Gbps of bandwidth reserved for tunnel traffic. fpc slot-number is the slot number of the MPC. In this configuration, the tunnel interfaces created are gr-5/1/1, pe-5/1/1, pd-5/1/1, vt-5/1/1, and so on.

To create a 40-Gbps tunnel interface, use the following configuration:

Configuring Tunnel Interfaces on MX Series Routers with MX2K-MPC8E

MX2K-MPC8E support a total of four inline tunnels per MPC, one per PIC. You can create a set of tunnel interfaces per PIC slot up to a maximum of four slots from 0 through 3.

To configure the tunnel interfaces, include the tunnel-services statement and an optional bandwidth of 1–120Gbps at the [edit chassis fpc fpc-slot pic number ] hierarchy level. If you do not specify the tunnel bandwidth then, the tunnel interface can have a maximum bandwidth of up to 120 Gbps.

To verify that the tunnel interfaces have been created, issue the show interfaces terse operational mode command. For more information, see the CLI Explorer.

In the following example, you create tunnel interfaces on PIC 1 of MPC 5 with 40 Gbps of bandwidth reserved for tunnel traffic. fpc slot-number is the slot number of the MPC. In this configuration, the tunnel interfaces created are gr-5/1/1, pe-5/1/1, pd-5/1/1, vt-5/1/1, and so on.

To create a 40-Gbps tunnel interface, use the following configuration:

Configuring Tunnel Interfaces on MX Series Routers with MX2K-MPC9E

MX2K-MPC9E supports a total of four inline tunnels per MPC, one per PIC. You can create a set of tunnel interfaces per PIC slot up to a maximum of four slots from 0 through 3.

To configure the tunnel interfaces, include the tunnel-services statement and an optional bandwidth in the range 1–200Gbps at the [edit chassis fpc fpc-slot pic number ] hierarchy level. If you do not specify the tunnel bandwidth then, the tunnel interface can have a maximum bandwidth of up to 200 Gbps.

To verify that the tunnel interfaces have been created, issue the show interfaces terse operational mode command. For more information, see the CLI Explorer.

In the following example, you create tunnel interfaces on PIC 1 of MPC 5 with 40 Gbps of bandwidth reserved for tunnel traffic. fpc slot-number is the slot number of the MPC. In this configuration, the tunnel interfaces created are gr-5/1/1, pe-5/1/1, pd-5/1/1, vt-5/1/1, and so on.

To create a 40-Gbps tunnel interface, use the following configuration:

Example: Configuring Tunnel Interfaces on a Gigabit Ethernet 40-Port DPC

The following example shows how to create tunnel interfaces on Packet Forwarding Engine 1 of DPC 4 with 1 Gbps of bandwidth reserved for tunnel services. On a Gigabit Ethernet 40-port DPC, tunnel interfaces coexist with Ethernet interfaces. With this configuration, the Gigabit Ethernet interfaces are ge-4/1/0 through ge-4/1/9. The tunnel interfaces created are gr-4/1/10, pe-4/1/10, pd-4/1/10, vt-4/1/10 and so on.

Example: Configuring Tunnel Interfaces on a 10-Gigabit Ethernet 4-Port DPC

In this example, you create tunnel interfaces on Packet Forwarding Engine 0 of DPC 4 with 10 Gbps of bandwidth reserved for tunnel traffic. Ethernet and tunnel interfaces cannot coexist on the same Packet Forwarding Engine of a 10-Gigabit Ethernet 4-port DPC. With this configuration, the tunnel interfaces created are gr-4/0/0, pe-4/0/0, pd-4/0/0, vt-4/0/0 and so on.

Configuring Tunnel Interfaces on MX 204 Routers

The MX204 router is a fixed-configuration router, and supports one fixed Routing Engine. It has two PICs and contains a total of twelve fixed ports, in two groups of four and eight, respectively. The set of four ports (referred to as the PIC 0 ports) are rate selectable and can be configured at 10-Gbps (by using a breakout cable), 40-Gbps, or 100-Gbps speed. However, not all the ports support all the three speeds. The set of eight ports (referred to as PIC 1 ports) operate at a fixed speed of 10-Gbps.

The MX204 router supports two inline tunnels - one per PIC. To configure the tunnel interfaces, include the tunnel-services statement and an optional bandwidth of 1 Gbps through 200 Gbps at the [edit chassis fpc fpc-slot pic number] hierarchy level. If you do not specify the tunnel bandwidth then, the tunnel interface can have a maximum bandwidth of up to 200 Gbps.

To verify that the tunnel interfaces have been created, issue the show interfaces terse operational mode command. For more information, see the CLI Explorer.

In the following example, you create tunnel interfaces on PIC 0 of MPC 0 with 40 Gbps of bandwidth reserved for tunnel traffic. fpc slot-number is the slot number of the MPC.

To create a 40-Gbps tunnel interface, use the following configuration:

Configuring Tunnel Interfaces on T4000 Routers

To create tunnel interfaces on a T4000 Core Router, include the following statements at the [edit chassis] hierarchy level:

fpc slot-number denotes the slot number of the FPC. On the T4000 router, the range is 0 through 7.

Note
  • This applies only to the T4000 Type 5 FPC. If any other type of FPC is configured in this slot, this configuration is ignored and no tunnel physical interface is created.

  • When you use Type 5 FPCs, the tunnel interfaces are soft interfaces and allow as much traffic as the forwarding-path allows. So, it is advantageous to setup tunnel services without artificially limiting traffic by setting the bandwidth statement.

pic number on the T4000 router is 0 or 1.

bandwidth bandwidth-value is the amount of bandwidth to reserve for the tunnel traffic on each Packet Forwarding Engine. The bandwidth value accepted includes every multiple of 10g up to 100g.

If you specify a bandwidth that is not compatible, tunnel services are not activated. For example, you cannot specify a bandwidth of 1 Gbps for a Packet Forwarding Engine on a 100-Gigabit Ethernet PIC with CFP.

To verify that the tunnel interfaces have been created, issue the show interfaces terse operational mode command. For more information, see the Junos Interfaces Command Reference.