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CCC, TCC, and Layer 2.5 Switching Configuration

 

TCC and Layer 2.5 Switching Overview

Translational cross-connect (TCC) allows you to forward traffic between a variety of Layer 2 protocols or circuits. It is similar to its predecessor, CCC. However, while CCC requires the same Layer 2 encapsulations on both sides of a router (such as Point-to-Point Protocol [PPP] or Frame Relay-to-Frame Relay), TCC lets you connect different types of Layer 2 protocols interchangeably. With TCC, combinations such as PPP-to-ATM and Ethernet-to-Frame Relay cross-connections are possible. Also, TCC can be used to create Layer 2.5 VPNs and Layer 2.5 circuits.

Consider a sample topology (Figure 1) in which you can configure a full-duplex Layer 2.5 translational cross-connect between Router A and Router C, using a Juniper Networks router, Router B, as the TCC interface. In this topology, Router B strips all PPP encapsulation data from frames arriving from Router A and adds ATM encapsulation data before the frames are sent to Router C. All Layer 2 negotiations are terminated at the interconnecting router (Router B).

Figure 1: Sample Translation Cross-Connect Topology
Sample Translation Cross-Connect Topology

TCC functionality is different from standard Layer 2 switching. TCC only swaps Layer 2 headers. No other processing, such as header checksums, time-to-live (TTL) decrementing, or protocol handling, is performed. Currently, TCC is supported in IPv4, ISO, and MPLS.

Ethernet TCC is supported on interfaces that carry IPv4 traffic only. For 8-port, 12-port, and 48-port Fast Ethernet PICs, TCC and extended VLAN CCC are not supported. For 4-port Gigabit Ethernet PICs, extended VLAN CCC and extended VLAN TCC are not supported.

Configuring VLAN TCC Encapsulation

VLAN TCC encapsulation allows circuits to have different media on either side of the forwarding path. VLAN TCC encapsulation supports TPID 0x8100 only. You must include configuration statements at the logical and physical interface hierarchy levels.

Starting in Junos OS Release 20.1R1, aggregated Ethernet interfaces support VLAN translational cross-connect (TCC) encapsulation. For configuring VLAN TCC encapsulation, you must have the member links of aggregated Ethernet with VLAN TCC encapsulation supported hardware.

Note

MX series routers does not perform any external commit check for member links of aggregated interfaces for the VLAN TCC encapsulation supported hardware.

To configure VLAN TCC encapsulation, include the encapsulation statement and specify the vlan-tcc option:

You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number ]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number]

Additionally, configure the logical interface by including the proxy and remote statements:

You can include these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family tcc]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family tcc]

The proxy address is the IP address of the non-Ethernet TCC neighbor for which the TCC router is acting as a proxy.

The remote address is the IP or MAC address of the remote router. The remote statement provides ARP capability from the TCC switching router to the Ethernet neighbor. The MAC address is the physical Layer 2 address of the Ethernet neighbor.

When VLAN TCC encapsulation is configured on the logical interface, you also must specify flexible Ethernet services on the physical interface. To specify flexible Ethernet services, include the encapsulation statement at the [edit interfaces interface-name] hierarchy level and specify the flexible-ethernet-services option:

Extended VLAN TCC encapsulation supports TPIDs 0x8100 and 0x9901. Extended VLAN TCC is specified at the physical interface level. When configured, all units on that interface must use VLAN TCC encapsulation, and no explicit configuration is needed on logical interfaces.

One-port Gigabit Ethernet, 2-port Gigabit Ethernet, and 4-port Fast Ethernet PICs with VLAN tagging enabled can use VLAN TCC encapsulation. To configure the encapsulation on a physical interface, include the encapsulation statement at the [edit interfaces interface-name] hierarchy level and specify the extended-vlan-tcc option:

For VLAN TCC encapsulation, all VLAN IDs from 1 through 1024 are valid. VLAN ID 0 is reserved for tagging the priority of frames.

Extended VLAN TCC is not supported on 4-port Gigabit Ethernet PICs.

Configuring Translation Cross-Connect Interface Switching

To configure a full-duplex Layer 2.5 translation cross-connect between two routers (A and C), you can configure a Juniper Networks router (Router B) as the TCC interface. Ethernet TCC encapsulation provides an Ethernet wide area circuit for interconnecting IP traffic. Consider the topology in Figure 2 where the Router A-to-Router B circuit is PPP, and the Router B-to-Router C circuit accepts packets carrying standard TPID values.

Figure 2: Sample Topology of Layer 2.5 Translational Cross-Connect
Sample Topology of Layer 2.5 Translational
Cross-Connect

If traffic flows from Router A to Router C, the Junos OS strips all PPP encapsulation data from incoming packets and adds Ethernet encapsulation data before forwarding the packets. If traffic flows from Router C to Router A, the Junos OS strips all Ethernet encapsulation data from incoming packets and adds PPP encapsulation data before forwarding the packets.

To configure the router as the translational cross-connect interface:

  1. In the configuration mode, at the [edit] hierarchy level, first configure the interface that is connected to Router A.
  2. (Optional) Specify the description of the interface. For example, you could specify the interface name on Router A that is connected to this interface.
  3. Specify the encapsulation. If the Router A to Router B circuit is PPP, then specify ppp-tcc as the encapsulation. If the Router A to Router B circuit is frame relay, specify frame-relay-tcc.
  4. In the configuration mode, at the [edit] hierarchy level, first configure the interface that is connected to Router C.
  5. (Optional) Specify the description of this interface. For example, you could specify the interface name on Router C that is connected to this interface.
  6. Specify the encapsulation. If the Router B to Router C circuit is Ethernet, then specify ethernet-tcc as the encapsulation. If the Router B to Router C circuit is ATM, specify atm-tcc-vc-mux.
  7. Specify the IP address or MAC address of the remote router to provide address resolution protocol (ARP) for the TCC router’s Ethernet-based neighbor using the remote statement. You must specify the statement at the [edit interfaces interface-name unit unit-number family tcc] hierarchy level. You can a specify the MAC address of the remote router instead of the IP address. The MAC address is the physical Layer 2 address of the Ethernet neighbor.
  8. Specify the IP address of the non-Ethernet TCC neighbor for which the TCC router is acting as a proxy using the proxy statement. You must specify the statement at the [edit interfaces interface-name unit unit-number family tcc] hierarchy level.

To verify the TCC connection, use the show connections command on TCC router.

CCC Overview

Circuit cross-connect (CCC) allows you to configure transparent connections between two circuits, where a circuit can be a Frame Relay data-link connection identifier (DLCI), an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) virtual circuit (VC), a Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) interface, a Cisco High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC) interface, or an MPLS label-switched path (LSP). Using CCC, packets from the source circuit are delivered to the destination circuit with, at most, the Layer 2 address being changed. No other processing—such as header checksums, time-to-live (TTL) decrementing, or protocol processing—is done.

Note

The QFX10000 Series switches do not support ATM virtual circuits.

CCC circuits fall into two categories: logical interfaces, which include DLCIs, VCs, virtual local area network (VLAN) IDs, PPP and Cisco HDLC interfaces, and LSPs. The two circuit categories provide three types of cross-connect:

  • Layer 2 switching—Cross-connects between logical interfaces provide what is essentially Layer 2 switching. The interfaces that you connect must be of the same type.

  • MPLS tunneling—Cross-connects between interfaces and LSPs allow you to connect two distant interface circuits of the same type by creating MPLS tunnels that use LSPs as the conduit.

  • LSP stitching—Cross-connects between LSPs provide a way to “stitch” together two label-switched paths, including paths that fall in two different traffic engineering database areas.

For Layer 2 switching and MPLS tunneling, the cross-connect is bidirectional, so packets received on the first interface are transmitted out the second interface, and those received on the second interface are transmitted out the first. For LSP stitching, the cross-connect is unidirectional.

Understanding Carrier-of-Carriers VPNs

The customer of a VPN service provider might be a service provider for the end customer. The following are the two main types of carrier-of-carriers VPNs (as described in RFC 4364:

  • Internet Service Provider as the Customer—The VPN customer is an ISP that uses the VPN service provider’s network to connect its geographically disparate regional networks. The customer does not have to configure MPLS within its regional networks.

  • VPN Service Provider as the Customer—The VPN customer is itself a VPN service provider offering VPN service to its customers. The carrier-of-carriers VPN service customer relies on the backbone VPN service provider for inter-site connectivity. The customer VPN service provider is required to run MPLS within its regional networks.

Figure 3 illustrates the network architecture used for a carrier-of-carriers VPN service.

Figure 3: Carrier-of-Carriers VPN Architecture
Carrier-of-Carriers VPN Architecture

This topic covers the following:

Internet Service Provider as the Customer

In this type of carrier-of-carriers VPN configuration, ISP A configures its network to provide Internet service to ISP B. ISP B provides the connection to the customer wanting Internet service, but the actual Internet service is provided by ISP A.

This type of carrier-of-carriers VPN configuration has the following characteristics:

  • The carrier-of-carriers VPN service customer (ISP B) does not need to configure MPLS on its network.

  • The carrier-of-carriers VPN service provider (ISP A) must configure MPLS on its network.

  • MPLS must also be configured on the CE routers and PE routers connected together in the carrier-of-carriers VPN service customer’s and carrier-of-carriers VPN service provider’s networks.

VPN Service Provider as the Customer

A VPN service provider can have customers that are themselves VPN service providers. In this type of configuration, also called a hierarchical or recursive VPN, the customer VPN service provider’s VPN-IPv4 routes are considered external routes, and the backbone VPN service provider does not import them into its VRF table. The backbone VPN service provider imports only the customer VPN service provider’s internal routes into its VRF table.

The similarities and differences between interprovider and carrier-of-carriers VPNs are shown in Table 1.

Table 1: Comparison of Interprovider and Carrier-of-Carriers VPNs

Feature

ISP Customer

VPN Service Provider Customer

Customer edge device

AS border router

PE router

IBGP sessions

Carry IPv4 routes

Carry external VPN-IPv4 routes with associated labels

Forwarding within the customer network

MPLS is optional

MPLS is required

Support for VPN service as the customer is supported on QFX10000 switches starting with Junos OS Release 17.1R1.

Understanding Interprovider and Carrier-of-Carriers VPNs

All interprovider and carrier-of-carriers VPNs share the following characteristics:

  • Each interprovider or carrier-of-carriers VPN customer must distinguish between internal and external customer routes.

  • Internal customer routes must be maintained by the VPN service provider in its PE routers.

  • External customer routes are carried only by the customer’s routing platforms, not by the VPN service provider’s routing platforms.

The key difference between interprovider and carrier-of-carriers VPNs is whether the customer sites belong to the same AS or to separate ASs:

  • Interprovider VPNs—The customer sites belong to different ASs. You need to configure EBGP to exchange the customer’s external routes.

  • Understanding Carrier-of-Carriers VPNs—The customer sites belong to the same AS. You need to configure IBGP to exchange the customer’s external routes.

In general, each service provider in a VPN hierarchy is required to maintain its own internal routes in its P routers, and the internal routes of its customers in its PE routers. By recursively applying this rule, it is possible to create a hierarchy of VPNs.

The following are definitions of the types of PE routers specific to interprovider and carrier-of-carriers VPNs:

  • The AS border router is located at the AS border and handles traffic leaving and entering the AS.

  • The end PE router is the PE router in the customer VPN; it is connected to the CE router at the end customer’s site.

Configuring an MPLS-Based VLAN CCC Using a Layer 2 Circuit

You can configure an 802.1Q VLAN as an MPLS-based Layer 2 circuit on the switch to interconnect multiple customer sites with Layer 2 technology.

This topic describes configuring provider edge (PE) switches in an MPLS network using a circuit cross-connect (CCC) on a tagged VLAN interface (802.1Q VLAN) rather than a simple interface.

Note

You do not need to make any changes to existing provider switches in your MPLS network to support this type of configuration. For information on configuring provider switches, see Configuring MPLS on Provider Switches.

Note

You can send any kind of traffic over a CCC, including nonstandard bridge protocol data units (BPDUs) generated by other vendors’ equipment.

Note

If you configure a physical interface as VLAN-tagged and with the vlan-ccc encapsulation, you cannot configure the associated logical interfaces with the inet family. Doing so could cause the logical interfaces to drop packets.

To configure a PE switch with a VLAN CCC and an MPLS-based Layer 2 circuit:

  1. Configure OSPF (or IS-IS) on the loopback (or switch address) and core interfaces:
    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface lo0.0

    user@switch# set ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface interface-name

    user@switch# set ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface interface-name

    user@switch# set ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface interface-name

  2. Enable traffic engineering for the routing protocol:
    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set ospf traffic-engineering

  3. Configure an IP address for the loopback interface and for the core interfaces:
    [edit]

    user@switch# set interfaces lo0 unit logical-unit-number family inet address address

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet address address

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet address address

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet address address


  4. Enable the MPLS protocol with CSPF disabled:Note

    CSPF is a shortest-path-first algorithm that has been modified to take into account specific restrictions when the shortest path across the network is calculated. You need to disable CSPF for link protection to function properly on interarea paths.

    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set mpls no-cspf
  5. Configure the customer edge interface as a Layer 2 circuit from the local PE switch to the other PE switch:
    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set l2circuit neighbor address interface interface-name virtual-circuit-id identifier

    Tip

    Use the switch address of the other switch as the neighbor address.

  6. Configure MPLS on the core interfaces:
    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set mpls interface interface-name

    user@switch# set mpls interface interface-name

    user@switch# set mpls interface interface-name

  7. Configure LDP on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set ldp interface lo0.0

    user@switch# set ldp interface interface-name

    user@switch# set ldp interface interface-name

    user@switch# set ldp interface interface-name

  8. Configure family mpls on the logical units of the core interfaces:
    [edit]

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family mpls

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family mpls

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family mpls


    Note

    You can enable family mpls on either individual interfaces or aggregated Ethernet interfaces. You cannot enable it on tagged VLAN interfaces.

  9. Enable VLAN tagging on the customer edge interface of the local PE switch:
    [edit]

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name vlan-tagging
  10. Configure the customer edge interface to use VLAN CCC encapsulation:
    [edit]

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name encapsulation vlan-ccc
  11. Configure the logical unit of the customer edge interface with a VLAN ID:Note

    The VLAN ID cannot be configured on logical interface unit 0. The logical unit number must be 1 or higher.

    The same VLAN ID must be used when configuring the customer edge interface on the other PE switch.

    [edit ]

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name logical-unit-number vlan-idvlan-id

When you have completed configuring one PE switch, follow the same procedures to configure the other PE switch.

Note

For EX Series switches, you must use the same type of switch for the other PE switch.

VLAN CCC Encapsulation on Transport Side of Pseudowire Client Logical Interfaces Overview

Currently, Junos OS does not allow the same VLAN ID to be configured on more than one logical interface under the same pseudowire client physical interface. To support vlan-ccc encapsulation on transport pseudowire service (PS) interface on the provider edge (PE) device, this restriction is removed and you can configure the same VLAN ID on more than one logical interface.

The primary reason to configure vlan-ccc on the transport PS interface is interoperability with the existing access and aggregate devices in the network. Currently, Junos OS supports ethernet-ccc encapsulation on the transport PS interface. Typically, while establishing a pseudowire connection, the access device initiates a VLAN-based pseudowire (also known as VLAN-tagged mode), and a PE router signals the Ethernet mode VLAN back to the access device. For this type of pseudowire connection to be established, you can use the ignore-encapsulation-mismatch statement. However, the Junos OS device (access device) might not support the ignore-encapsulation-mismatch statement and, as a result, the pseudowire connection is not formed. When the ignore-encapsulation-mismatch statement is not supported on the access device, you can configure vlan-ccc between the nodes to form a pseudowire connection.

The forwarding data path is not changed with the new vlan-ccc encapsulation on the transport PS interface and the behavior similar to that when the ethernet-ccc encapsulation is configured on the transport PS interface. The transport PS interface either encapsulates or de-encapsulate the outer Layer 2 header and MPLS headers on the transmitted or received packets on the WAN port. Inner Ethernet or VLAN headers of the packet are handled on pseudowire client service logical interfaces. You must configure pseudowire client service logical interfaces with appropriate VLAN IDs or VLAN tags.

The following sections provides details, along with a sample configuration, about pseudowire configuration from both access and aggregation nodes.

Pseudowire Configuration from Access Node

These pseudowires are set up using VLANs from the access node for customer devices attached to the Layer 2 circuit configured on access and PE routers with customer VLANs (C-VLANs). The ingress traffic (from the access node side) on the PE router is single VLAN tagged (inner Ethernet header), and thus the service logical interfaces must be configured with the same VLAN IDs corresponding to the C-VLAN IDs attached to the access node.

Figure 4 provides the details of a transport PS interface from an access node (access node).

Figure 4: Pseudowire Client Transport Logical Interface from Access Node
 Pseudowire
Client Transport Logical Interface from Access Node

The following example shows the configuration of a pseudowire client logical interface configuration on a PE router from an access node:

Pseudowire Configuration from Aggregation Node

In this case, the aggregation node processes a stacked VLAN (also known as Q-in-Q). The pseudowire originates from aggregation node and terminates on a PE router. The aggregation node pushes the service VLAN (S-VLAN) tag, and the PE router is expected to operate on two VLAN tags—the outer VLAN tag corresponds to an S-VLAN and the inner VLAN tag corresponds to a C-VLAN. The VLAN ID configured on the transport PS interface at the PE router must match the VLAN tag of the S-VLAN. On the pseudowire client service logical interface, the outer VLAN tag must be configured to match the S-VLAN and the inner VLAN tag must be configured to match the C-VLAN.

Figure 5 provides the details of a transport PS interface from an aggregation node.

Figure 5: Pseudowire Client Transport Logical Interface from Aggregation Node
Pseudowire
Client Transport Logical Interface from Aggregation Node

The following example shows the configuration of a pseudowire client logical interface configuration on a PE router from an aggregation node:

Transmitting Nonstandard BPDUs

CCC protocol (and Layer 2 Circuit and Layer 2 VPN) configurations can transmit nonstandard bridge protocol data units (BPDUs) generated by other vendors’ equipment. This is the default behavior on all supported PICs and requires no additional configuration.

The following PICs are supported on M320 and T Series routers:

  • 1-port Gigabit Ethernet PIC

  • 2-port Gigabit Ethernet PIC

  • 4-port Gigabit Ethernet PIC

  • 10-port Gigabit Ethernet PIC

TCC Overview

Translational cross-connect (TCC) is a switching concept that enables you to establish interconnections between a variety of Layer 2 protocols or circuits. It is similar to CCC. However, whereas CCC requires the same Layer 2 encapsulations on each side of a Juniper Networks router (such as PPP-to-PPP or Frame Relay-to-Frame Relay), TCC enables you to connect different types of Layer 2 protocols interchangeably. When you use TCC, combinations such as PPP-to-ATM (see Figure 6) and Ethernet-to-Frame Relay connections are possible.

Figure 6: TCC Example
TCC Example

The Layer 2 circuits and encapsulation types that can be interconnected by TCC are:

  • Ethernet

  • Extended VLANs

  • PPP

  • HDLC

  • ATM

  • Frame Relay

TCC works by removing the Layer 2 header when frames enter the router and adding a different Layer 2 header on the frames before they leave the router. In Figure 6, the PPP encapsulation is stripped from the frames arriving at Router B, and the ATM encapsulation is added before the frames are sent to Router C.

Note that all control traffic is terminated at the interconnecting router (Router B). Examples of traffic controllers include the Link Control Protocol (LCP) and the Network Control Protocol (NCP) for PPP, keepalives for HDLC, and Local Management Interface (LMI) for Frame Relay.

TCC functionality is different from standard Layer 2 switching. TCC only swaps Layer 2 headers. No other processing, such as header checksums, TTL decrementing, or protocol handling is performed. TCC is supported for IPv4 only.

Address Resolution Protocol (APR) packet policing on TCC Ethernet interfaces is effective for releases 10.4 and onwards.

You can configure TCC for interface switching and for Layer 2 VPNs. For more information about using TCC for virtual private networks (VPNs), see the Junos OS VPNs Library for Routing Devices.

Configuring Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connects Using CCC

Layer 2 switching cross-connects join logical interfaces to form what is essentially Layer 2 switching. The interfaces that you connect must be of the same type.

Figure 7 illustrates a Layer 2 switching cross-connect. In this topology, Router A and Router C have Frame Relay connections to Router B, which is a Juniper Networks router. Circuit cross-connect (CCC) allows you to configure Router B to act as a Frame Relay (Layer 2) switch.

To configure Router B to act as a Frame Relay switch, you configure a circuit from Router A to Router C that passes through Router B, effectively configuring Router B as a Frame Relay switch with respect to these routers. This configuration allows Router B to transparently switch packets (frames) between Router A and Router C without regard to the packets’ contents or the Layer 3 protocols. The only processing that Router B performs is to translate DLCI 600 to 750.

Figure 7: Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connect
Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connect

If the Router A–to–Router B and Router B–to–Router C circuits were PPP, for example, the Link Control Protocol and Network Control Protocol exchanges occur between Router A and Router C. These messages are handled transparently by Router B, allowing Router A and Router C to use various PPP options (such as header or address compression and authentication) that Router B might not support. Similarly, Router A and Router C exchange keepalives, providing circuit-to-circuit connectivity status.

You can configure Layer 2 switching cross-connects on PPP, Cisco HDLC, Frame Relay, Ethernet, and ATM circuits. In a single cross-connect, only like interfaces can be connected.

To configure Layer 2 switching cross-connects, you must configure the following on the router that is acting as the switch (Router B in Figure 7):

Configuring the CCC Encapsulation for Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connects

To configure Layer 2 switching cross-connects, configure the CCC encapsulation on the router that is acting as the switch (Router B in Figure 7).

Note

You cannot configure families on CCC interfaces; that is, you cannot include the family statement at the [edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number] hierarchy level.

For instructions for configuring the encapsulation for Layer 2 switching cross-connects, see the following sections:

Configuring ATM Encapsulation for Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connects

For ATM circuits, specify the encapsulation when configuring the virtual circuit (VC). Configure each VC as a circuit or a regular logical interface by including the following statements:

You can include these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces]

Configuring Ethernet Encapsulation for Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connects

For Ethernet circuits, specify ethernet-ccc in the encapsulation statement. This statement configures the entire physical device. For these circuits to work, you must also configure a logical interface (unit 0).

Ethernet interfaces with standard Tag Protocol Identifier (TPID) tagging can use Ethernet CCC encapsulation. On M Series Multiservice Edge Routers, except the M320, one-port Gigabit Ethernet, two-port Gigabit Ethernet, four-port Gigabit Ethernet, and four-port Fast Ethernet PICs can use Ethernet CCC encapsulation. On T Series Core Routers and M320 routers, one-port Gigabit Ethernet and two-port Gigabit Ethernet PICs installed in FPC2 can use Ethernet CCC encapsulation. When you use this encapsulation type, you can configure the ccc family only.

You can include these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces]

Configuring Ethernet VLAN Encapsulation for Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connects

An Ethernet virtual LAN (VLAN) circuit can be configured using either the vlan-ccc or extended-vlan-ccc encapsulation. If you configure the extended-vlan-ccc encapsulation on the physical interface, you cannot configure the inet family on the logical interfaces. Only the ccc family is allowed. If you configure the vlan-ccc encapsulation on the physical interface, both the inet and ccc families are supported on the logical interfaces. Ethernet interfaces in VLAN mode can have multiple logical interfaces.

For encapsulation type vlan-ccc, VLAN IDs from 512 through 4094 are reserved for CCC VLANs. For the extended-vlan-ccc encapsulation type, all VLAN IDs 1 and higher are valid. VLAN ID 0 is reserved for tagging the priority of frames.

Note

Some vendors use the proprietary TPIDs 0x9100 and 0x9901 to encapsulate a VLAN-tagged packet into a VLAN-CCC tunnel to interconnect a geographically separated metro Ethernet network. By configuring the extended-vlan-ccc encapsulation type, a Juniper Networks router can accept all three TPIDs (0x8100, 0x9100, and 0x9901).

Configure an Ethernet VLAN circuit with the vlan-ccc encapsulation as follows:

You can configure these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces]

Configure an Ethernet VLAN circuit with the extended-vlan-ccc encapsulation statement as follows:

You can configure these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces]

Whether you configure the encapsulation as vlan-ccc or extended-vlan-ccc, you must enable VLAN tagging by including the vlan-tagging statement.

Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Encapsulation for Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connects

You can configure aggregated Ethernet interfaces for CCC connections and for Layer 2 virtual private networks (VPNs).

Aggregated Ethernet interfaces configured with VLAN tagging can be configured with multiple logical interfaces. The only encapsulation available for aggregated Ethernet logical interfaces is vlan-ccc. When you configure the vlan-id statement, you are limited to VLAN IDs 512 through 4094.

Aggregated Ethernet interfaces configured without VLAN tagging can be configured only with the ethernet-ccc encapsulation. All untagged Ethernet packets received are forwarded based on the CCC parameters.

To configure aggregated Ethernet interfaces for CCC connections, include the ae0 statement at the [edit interfaces] hierarchy level:

Be aware of the following limitations when configuring CCC connections over aggregated Ethernet interfaces:

  • If you configured load balancing between child links, be aware that a different hash key is used to distribute packets among the child links. Standard aggregated interfaces have family inet configured. An IP version 4 (IPv4) hash key (based on the Layer 3 information) is used to distribute packets among the child links. A CCC connection over an aggregated Ethernet interface has family ccc configured instead. Instead of an IPv4 hash key, an MPLS hash key (based on the destination media access control [MAC] address) is used to distributed packets among the child links.

  • The extended-vlan-ccc encapsulation is not supported on the 12-port Fast Ethernet PIC and the 48-port Fast Ethernet PIC.

  • The Junos OS does not support the Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) when an aggregated interface is configured as a VLAN (with vlan-ccc encapsulation). LACP can be configured only when the aggregated interface is configured with the ethernet-ccc encapsulation.

For more information about how to configure aggregated Ethernet interfaces, see the Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices.

Configuring Frame Relay Encapsulation for Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connects

For Frame Relay circuits, specify the encapsulation when configuring the DLCI. Configure each DLCI as a circuit or a regular logical interface. The DLCI for regular interfaces must be from 1 through 511. For CCC interfaces, it must be from 512 through 4094.

You can configure these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces]

Configuring PPP and Cisco HDLC Encapsulation for Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connects

For PPP and Cisco HDLC circuits, specify the encapsulation in the encapsulation statement. This statement configures the entire physical device. For these circuits to work, you must configure a logical interface (unit 0).

You can configure these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces type-fpc/pic/port]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces type-fpc/pic/port]

Configuring the CCC Connection for Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connects

To configure Layer 2 switching cross-connects, define the connection between the two circuits by including the interface-switch statement. You configure this connection on the router that is acting as the switch (Router B in Figure 7). The connection joins the interface that comes from the circuit’s source to the interface that leads to the circuit’s destination. When you specify the interface names, include the logical portion of the name, which corresponds to the logical unit number. The cross-connect is bidirectional, so packets received on the first interface are transmitted out the second interface, and those received on the second interface are transmitted out the first.

You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit protocols connections]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols connections]

Configuring MPLS for Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connects

For Layer 2 switching cross-connects to work, you must enable MPLS on the router by including at least the following statements. This minimum configuration enables MPLS on a logical interface for the switching cross-connect.

Include the family mpls statement:

You can configure this statement at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number]

You can then specify this logical interface in the MPLS protocol configuration:

You can configure these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit protocols]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols]

Example: Configuring a Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connect

Configure a full-duplex Layer 2 switching cross-connect between Router A and Router C, using a Juniper Networks router, Router B, as the virtual switch. See the topology in Figure 8 and Figure 9.

Figure 8: Topology of a Frame Relay Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connect
Topology of a Frame Relay Layer 2
Switching Cross-Connect
Figure 9: Sample Topology of a VLAN Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connect
Sample Topology of a VLAN Layer 2 Switching
Cross-Connect

Configuring Layer 2 Switching Cross-Connect on ACX5440

Starting in Junos OS Release 19.3R1, you can leverage the hardware support available for cross-connects on the ACX5448 device with the Layer 2 local switching functionality using certain models. With this support, you can provide the EVP and Ethernet Virtual Private Line (EVPL) services..

Local-switching with the following forwarding models are supported:

  • VLAN-CCC (logical interface-level local-switching) without any map.

  • VLAN-CCC (logical interface-level local-switching) with the following vlan-maps:

    • Push 0x8100.pushVLAN (QinQ type)

    • Swap 0x8100.swapVLAN

  • Aggregated Ethernet (AE) static interfaces.

  • AE interfaces with LACP, load-balance all active mode.

  • Local-switching end-interface support for AE or LAG interface (one non-AE interface and other AE interface).

  • Local-switching both interface as AE or LAG interfaces.

To enable Layer 2 local switching on the ACX5448 device, you can use the existing configuration statements for Layer 2 circuits. For example,

Configuring MPLS LSP Tunnel Cross-Connects Using CCC

MPLS tunnel cross-connects between interfaces and LSPs allow you to connect two distant interface circuits of the same type by creating MPLS tunnels that use LSPs as the conduit. The topology in Figure 10 illustrates an MPLS LSP tunnel cross-connect. In this topology, two separate networks, in this case ATM access networks, are connected through an IP backbone. CCC allows you to establish an LSP tunnel between the two domains. With LSP tunneling, you tunnel the ATM traffic from one network across a SONET backbone to the second network by using an MPLS LSP.

Figure 10: MPLS Tunnel Cross-Connect
MPLS Tunnel Cross-Connect

When traffic from Router A (VC 234) reaches Router B, it is encapsulated and placed into an LSP, which is sent through the backbone to Router C. At Router C, the label is removed, and the packets are placed onto the ATM permanent virtual circuit (PVC) (VC 591) and sent to Router D. Similarly, traffic from Router D (VC 591) is sent over an LSP to Router B, then placed on VC 234 to Router A.

You can configure LSP tunnel cross-connect on PPP, Cisco HDLC, Frame Relay, and ATM circuits. In a single cross-connect, only like interfaces can be connected.

When you use MPLS tunnel cross-connects to support IS-IS, you must ensure that the LSP’s maximum transmission unit (MTU) can, at a minimum, accommodate a 1492-octet IS-IS protocol data unit (PDU) in addition to the link-level overhead associated with the technology being connected.

For the tunnel cross-connects to work, the IS-IS frame size on the edge routers (Routers A and D in Figure 11) must be smaller than the LSP’s MTU.

Note

Frame size values do not include the frame check sequence (FCS) or delimiting flags.

To determine the LSP MTU required to support IS-IS, use the following calculation:

The framing overhead varies based on the encapsulation being used. The following lists the IS-IS encapsulation overhead values for various encapsulations:

  • ATM

    • AAL5 multiplex—8 bytes (RFC 1483)

    • VC multiplex—0 bytes

  • Frame Relay

    • Multiprotocol—2 bytes (RFCs 1490 and 2427)

    • VC multiplex—0 bytes

  • HDLC—4 bytes

  • PPP—4 bytes

  • VLAN—21 bytes (802.3/LLC)

For IS-IS to work over VLAN-CCC, the LSP’s MTU must be at least 1513 bytes (or 1518 for 1497-byte PDUs). If you increase the size of a Fast Ethernet MTU above the default of 1500 bytes, you might need to explicitly configure jumbo frames on intervening equipment.

To modify the MTU, include the mtu statement when configuring the logical interface family at the [edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number encapsulation family] hierarchy level. For more information about setting the MTU, see the Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices.

To configure an LSP tunnel cross-connect, you must configure the following on the interdomain router (Router B in Figure 11):

Configuring the CCC Encapsulation for LSP Tunnel Cross-Connects

To configure LSP tunnel cross-connects, you must configure the CCC encapsulation on the ingress and egress routers (Router B and Router C, respectively, in Figure 11).

Note

You cannot configure families on CCC interfaces; that is, you cannot include the family statement at the [edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number] hierarchy level.

For PPP or Cisco HDLC circuits, include the encapsulation statement to configure the entire physical device. For these circuits to work, you must configure logical unit 0 on the interface.

You can include these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces]

For ATM circuits, specify the encapsulation when configuring the VC by including the following statements. For each VC, you configure whether it is a circuit or a regular logical interface.

You can include these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces]

For Frame Relay circuits, include the following statements to specify the encapsulation when configuring the DLCI. For each DLCI, you configure whether it is a circuit or a regular logical interface. The DLCI for regular interfaces must be in the range 1 through 511. For CCC interfaces, it must be in the range 512 through 1022.

You can include these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces]

For more information about the encapsulation statement, see the Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices.

Configuring the CCC Connection for LSP Tunnel Cross-Connects

To configure LSP tunnel cross-connects, include the remote-interface-switch statement to define the connection between the two circuits on the ingress and egress routers (Router B and Router C, respectively, in Figure 11). The connection joins the interface or LSP that comes from the circuit’s source to the interface or LSP that leads to the circuit’s destination. When you specify the interface name, include the logical portion of the name, which corresponds to the logical unit number. For the cross-connect to be bidirectional, you must configure cross-connects on two routers.

You can include these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit protocols connections]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols connections]

Example: Configuring an LSP Tunnel Cross-Connect

Configure a full-duplex MPLS LSP tunnel cross-connect from Router A to Router D, passing through Router B and Router C. See the topology in Figure 11.

Figure 11: Example Topology of MPLS LSP Tunnel Cross-Connect
Example Topology of MPLS LSP Tunnel Cross-Connect

On Router B:

On Router C:

Configuring TCC

This section describes how to configure translational cross-connect (TCC).

To configure TCC, you must perform the following tasks on the router that is acting as the switch:

Configuring the Encapsulation for Layer 2 Switching TCCs

To configure a Layer 2 switching TCC, specify the TCC encapsulation on the desired interfaces of the router that is acting as the switch.

Note

You cannot configure standard protocol families on TCC or CCC interfaces. Only the CCC family is allowed on CCC interfaces, and only the TCC family is allowed on TCC interfaces.

For Ethernet circuits and Ethernet extended VLAN circuits, you must also configure the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP). See Configuring ARP for Ethernet and Ethernet Extended VLAN Encapsulations.

Configuring PPP and Cisco HDLC Encapsulation for Layer 2 Switching TCCs

For PPP and Cisco HDLC circuits, configure the encapsulation type for the entire physical device by specifying the appropriate value for the encapsulation statement. For these circuits to work, you must also configure the logical interface unit 0.

You can include these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces interface-name]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name]

Configuring ATM Encapsulation for Layer 2 Switching TCCs

For ATM circuits, configure the encapsulation type by specifying the appropriate value for the encapsulation statement in the virtual circuit (VC) configuration. Specify whether each VC is a circuit or a regular logical interface.

You can include these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces at-fpc/pic/port]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces at-fpc/pic/port]

Configuring Frame Relay Encapsulation for Layer 2 Switching TCCs

For Frame Relay circuits, configure the encapsulation type by specifying the value frame-relay-tcc for the encapsulation statement when configuring the data-link connection identifier (DLCI). You configure each DLCI as a circuit or a regular logical interface. The DLCI for regular interfaces must be in the range from 1 through 511, but for TCC and CCC interfaces it must be in the range from 512 through 1022.

You can include these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces interface-name]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name]

Configuring Ethernet Encapsulation for Layer 2 Switching TCCs

For Ethernet TCC circuits, configuring the encapsulation type for the entire physical device by specifying the value ethernet-tcc for the encapsulation statement.

You must also specify static values for a remote address and a proxy address at the [edit interfaces interface-name unit unit-number family tcc] or [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit unit-number family tcc] hierarchy level.

The remote address is associated with the TCC switching router’s Ethernet neighbor; in the remote statement you must specify both the IP address and the media access control (MAC) address of the Ethernet neighbor. The proxy address is associated with the TCC router’s other neighbor connected by the unlike link; in the proxy statement you must specify the IP address of the non-Ethernet neighbor.

You can configure Ethernet TCC encapsulation for the interfaces on 1-port Gigabit Ethernet, 2-port Gigabit Ethernet, 4-port Fast Ethernet, and 4-port Gigabit Ethernet PICs.

You can include these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces (fe | ge)-fpc/pic/port]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces (fe | ge)-fpc/pic/port]

Note

For Ethernet circuits, you must also configure the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP). See Configuring ARP for Ethernet and Ethernet Extended VLAN Encapsulations.

Configuring Ethernet Extended VLAN Encapsulation for Layer 2 Switching TCCs

For Ethernet extended VLAN circuits, configure the encapsulation type for the entire physical device by specifying the value extended-vlan-tcc for the encapsulation statement.

You must also enable VLAN tagging. Ethernet interfaces in VLAN mode can have multiple logical interfaces. With encapsulation type extended-vlan-tcc, all VLAN IDs from 0 through 4094 are valid, up to a maximum of 1024 VLANs. As with Ethernet circuits, you must also specify a proxy address and a remote address at the [edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family tcc] or [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit unit-number family tcc] hierarchy level (see Configuring Ethernet Encapsulation for Layer 2 Switching TCCs).

You can configure these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces interface-name]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name]

Note

For Ethernet extended VLAN circuits, you must also configure the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP). See Configuring ARP for Ethernet and Ethernet Extended VLAN Encapsulations.

Configuring ARP for Ethernet and Ethernet Extended VLAN Encapsulations

For Ethernet and Ethernet extended VLAN circuits with TCC encapsulation, you must also configure ARP. Because TCC simply removes one Layer 2 header and adds another, the default form of dynamic ARP is not supported; you must configure static ARP.

Because remote and proxy addresses are specified on the router performing TCC switching, you must apply the static ARP statement to the Ethernet-type interfaces of the routers that connect to the TCC-switched router. The arp statement must specify the IP address and the MAC address of the remotely connected neighbor by use of the unlike Layer 2 protocol on the far side of the TCC switching router.

You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet address ip-address]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet address ip-address]

Configuring the Connection for Layer 2 Switching TCCs

You must configure the connection between the two circuits of the Layer 2 switching TCC on the router acting as the switch. The connection joins the interface coming from the circuit’s source to the interface leading to the circuit’s destination. When you specify the interface names, include the logical portion of the name, which corresponds to the logical unit number. The cross-connect is bidirectional, so packets received on the first interface are transmitted from the second interface, and those received on the second interface are transmitted from the first.

To configure a connection for a local interface switch, include the following statements:

You can include these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit protocols connections]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols connections]

To configure a connection for a remote interface switch, include the following statements:

You can include these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit protocols connections]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols connections]

Configuring MPLS for Layer 2 Switching TCCs

For a Layer 2 switching TCC to work, you must enable MPLS on the router by including at least the following statements. This minimum configuration enables MPLS on a logical interface for the switching cross-connect.

Include the family mpls statement:

You can configure this statement at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number]

You can then specify this logical interface in the MPLS protocol configuration:

You can configure these statements at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit protocols]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols]

Note

MPLS LSP link protection does not support TCC.

CCC and TCC Graceful Restart

CCC and TCC graceful restart allows Layer 2 connections between customer edge (CE) routers to restart gracefully. These Layer 2 connections are configured with the remote-interface-switch or lsp-switch statements. Because these CCC and TCC connections have an implicit dependency on RSVP LSPs, graceful restart for CCC and TCC uses the RSVP graceful restart capabilities.

RSVP graceful restart must be enabled on the PE routers and P routers to enable graceful restart for CCC and TCC. Also, because RSVP is used as the signaling protocol for signaling label information, the neighboring router must use helper mode to assist with the RSVP restart procedures.

Figure 12 illustrates how graceful restart might work on a CCC connection between two CE routers.

Figure 12: Remote Interface Switch Connecting Two CE Routers Using CCC
Remote Interface Switch Connecting Two
CE Routers Using CCC

PE Router A is the ingress for the transmit LSP from PE Router A to PE Router B and the egress for the receive LSP from PE Router B to PE Router A. With RSVP graceful restart enabled on all the PE and P routers, the following occurs when PE router A restarts:

  • PE Router A preserves the forwarding state associated with the CCC routes (those from CCC to MPLS and from MPLS to CCC).

  • Traffic flows without disruption from CE router to CE router.

  • After the restart, PE Router A preserves the label for the LSP for which PE Router A is the egress (the receive LSP, for example). The transmit LSP from PE Router A to PE Router B can derive new label mappings, but should not cause any traffic disruption.

Configuring CCC and TCC Graceful Restart

To enable CCC and TCC graceful restart, include the graceful-restart statement:

You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit routing-options]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-options]

Configuring an MPLS-Based VLAN CCC Using the Connection Method (CLI Procedure)

You can configure an 802.1Q VLAN as an MPLS-based connection using EX8200 and EX4500 switches to interconnect multiple customer sites with Layer 2 technology.

This topic describes configuring provider edge (PE) switches in an MPLS network using a circuit cross-connect (CCC) on a tagged VLAN interface (802.1Q VLAN) rather than a simple interface.

Note

You do not need to make any changes to existing provider switches in your MPLS network to support this type of configuration. For information on configuring provider switches, see Configuring MPLS on EX8200 and EX4500 Provider Switches.

Note

You can send any kind of traffic over a CCC, including nonstandard bridge protocol data units (BPDUs) generated by other vendors’ equipment.

Note

If you configure a physical interface as VLAN-tagged and with the vlan-ccc encapsulation, you cannot configure the associated logical interfaces with the inet family. Doing so could cause the logical interfaces to drop packets.

To configure a PE switch with a VLAN CCC and an MPLS-based connections:

  1. Configure OSPF (or IS-IS) on the loopback (or switch address) and core interfaces:
    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface lo0.0

    user@switch# set ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface interface-name

    user@switch# set ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface interface-name

    user@switch# set ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface interface-name

  2. Enable traffic engineering for the routing protocol:
    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set ospf traffic-engineering

  3. Configure an IP address for the loopback interface and for the core interfaces:
    [edit]

    user@switch# set interfaces lo0 unit logical-unit-number family inet address address

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet address address

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet address address

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet address address


  4. Enable the MPLS protocol with cspf disabled:Note

    CSPF is a shortest-path-first algorithm that has been modified to take into account specific restrictions when the shortest path across the network is calculated. You need to disable CSPF for link protection to function properly on interarea paths.

    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set mpls no-cspf
  5. Enable VLAN tagging on the customer edge interface of the local PE switch:
    [edit]

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name vlan-tagging
  6. Configure the customer edge interface to use encapsulation vlan-ccc:
    [edit]

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name encapsulation vlan-ccc
  7. Configure the logical unit of the customer edge interface with a VLAN ID:Note

    The VLAN ID cannot be configured on logical interface unit 0.

    The same VLAN ID must be used when configuring the customer edge interface on the other PE switch.

    [edit ]

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name logical-unit-numberrbhadran vlan-id
  8. Define the label switched path (LSP):
    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set mpls label-switched-path lsp-name from address

    user@switch# set mpls label-switched-path lsp-name to address

    Tip

    You will need to use the specified LSP name again when configuring the CCC.

  9. Configure the connection between the two circuits in the CCC connection
    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set connections remote-interface-switch interface-switch interface local-interface

    user@switch# set connections remote-interface-switch interface-switch transmit-lsp destination-lsp

    user@switch# set connections remote-interface-switch interface-switch receive-lsp source-lsp

Configuring CCC Switching for Point-to-Multipoint LSPs

You can configure circuit cross-connect (CCC) between two circuits to switch traffic from interfaces to point-to-multipoint LSPs. This feature is useful for handling multicast or broadcast traffic (for example, a digital video stream).

To configure CCC switching for point-to-multipoint LSPs, you do the following:

  • On the ingress provider edge (PE) router, you configure CCC to switch traffic from an incoming interface to a point-to-multipoint LSP.

  • On the egress PE, you configure CCC to switch traffic from an incoming point-to-multipoint LSP to an outgoing interface.

The CCC connection for point-to-multipoint LSPs is unidirectional.

For more information about point-to-multipoint LSPs, see Point-to-Multipoint LSPs Overview.

To configure a CCC connection for a point-to-multipoint LSP, complete the steps in the following sections:

Configuring the Point-to-Multipoint LSP Switch on Ingress PE Routers

To configure the ingress PE router with a CCC switch for a point-to-multipoint LSP, include the p2mp-transmit-switch statement:

You can include the p2mp-transmit-switch statement at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit protocols connections]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols connections]

switch-name specifies the name of the ingress CCC switch.

input-interface input-interface-name.unit-number specifies the name of the ingress interface.

transmit-p2mp-lsp transmitting-lsp specifies the name of the transmitting point-to-multipoint LSP.

Configuring Local Receivers on a Point-to-Multipoint CCC LSP Switch on Ingress PE Routers

In addition to configuring an incoming CCC interface to a point-to-multipoint LSP on an ingress PE router, you can also configure CCC to switch traffic on an incoming CCC interface to one or more outgoing CCC interfaces by configuring output interfaces as local receivers.

To configure output interfaces, include the output-interface statement at the [edit protocols connections p2mp-transmit-switch p2mp-transmit-switch-name] hierarchy level.

You can configure one or more output interfaces as local receivers on the ingress PE router using this statement.

Use the show connections p2mp-transmit-switch (extensive | history | status), show route ccc <interface-name> (detail | extensive), and show route forwarding-table ccc <interface-name> (detail | extensive) commands to view details of the local receiving interfaces on the ingress PE router.

Configuring the Point-to-Multipoint LSP Switch on Egress PE Routers

To configure the CCC switch for a point-to-multipoint LSP on the egress PE router, include the p2mp-receive-switch statement.

You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:

  • [edit protocols connections]

  • [edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols connections]

switch-name specifies the name of the egress CCC switch.

output-interface [ output-interface-name.unit-number ] specifies the name of one or more egress interfaces.

receive-p2mp-lsp receptive-lsp specifies the name of the receptive point-to-multipoint LSP.

Configuring an MPLS-Based VLAN CCC Using a Layer 2 VPN (CLI Procedure)

You can configure an 802.1Q VLAN as an MPLS-based Layer 2 virtual private network (VPN) using EX8200 and EX4500 switches to interconnect multiple customer sites with Layer 2 technology.

This topic describes configuring provider edge (PE) switches in an MPLS network using a circuit cross-connect (CCC) on a tagged VLAN interface (802.1Q VLAN) rather than a simple interface.

Note

You do not need to make any changes to existing provider switches in your MPLS network to support this type of configuration. For information on configuring provider switches, see Configuring MPLS on EX8200 and EX4500 Provider Switches.

Note

You can send any kind of traffic over a CCC, including nonstandard bridge protocol data units (BPDUs) generated by other vendors’ equipment.

Note

If you configure a physical interface as VLAN-tagged and with the vlan-ccc encapsulation, you cannot configure the associated logical interfaces with the inet family. Doing so could cause the logical interfaces to drop packets.

To configure a PE switch with a VLAN CCC and an MPLS-based Layer 2 VPN:

  1. Configure OSPF (or IS-IS) on the loopback (or switch address) and core interfaces:
    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface lo0.0

    user@switch# set ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface interface-name

    user@switch# set ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface interface-name

    user@switch# set ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface interface-name

  2. Enable traffic engineering for the routing protocol:
    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set ospf traffic-engineering

  3. Configure an IP address for the loopback interface and for the core interfaces:
    [edit]

    user@switch# set interfaces lo0 unit logical-unit-number family inet address address

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet address address

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet address address

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet address address


  4. Enable the MPLS protocol with cspf disabled:Note

    CSPF is a shortest-path-first algorithm that has been modified to take into account specific restrictions when the shortest path across the network is calculated. You need to disable CSPF for link protection to function properly on interarea paths.

    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set mpls no-cspf
  5. Define the label switched path (LSP):
    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set mpls label-switched-path lsp_name to address

    Tip

    You will need to use the specified LSP name again when configuring the CCC.

  6. Configure MPLS on the core interfaces:
    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set mpls interface interface-name

    user@switch# set mpls interface interface-name

    user@switch# set mpls interface interface-name

  7. Configure RSVP on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
    [edit protocols]

    user@switch# set rsvp interface lo0.0

    user@switch# set rsvp interface interface-name

    user@switch# set rsvp interface interface-name

    user@switch# set rsvp interface interface-name

  8. Configure family mpls on the logical units of the core interfaces:
    [edit]

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family mpls

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family mpls

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family mpls


    Note

    You can enable family mpls on either individual interfaces or aggregated Ethernet interfaces. You cannot enable it on tagged VLAN interfaces.

  9. Enable VLAN tagging on the customer edge interface of the local PE switch:
    [edit]

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name vlan-tagging
  10. Configure the customer edge interface to use encapsulation vlan-ccc:
    [edit]

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name encapsulation vlan-ccc
  11. Configure the logical unit of the customer edge interface with a VLAN ID:Note

    The VLAN ID cannot be configured on logical interface unit 0. The logical unit number must be 1 or higher.

    The same VLAN ID must be used when configuring the customer edge interface on the other PE switch.

    [edit ]

    user@switch# set interfaces interface-name logical-unit-numbervlan-id vlan-id
  12. Configure BGP, specifying the loopback address as the local address and enabling family l2vpn signaling:
    [edit protocols bgp]

    user@switchPE1# set local-address address family l2vpn signaling
  13. Configure the BGP group, specifying the group name and type:
    [edit protocols bgp]

    user@switchPE1# set group ibgp type internal
  14. Configure the BGP neighbor, specifying the loopback address of the remote PE switch as the neighbor’s address:
    [edit protocols bgp]

    user@switchPE1# set neighbor address
  15. Configure the routing instance, specifying the routing-instance name and using l2vpn as the instance type:
    [edit routing-instances]

    user@switchPE1# set routing-instance-name instance-type l2vpn
  16. Configure the routing instance to apply to the customer edge interface:
    [edit routing-instances]

    user@switchPE1# set routing-instance-name interface interface-name
  17. Configure the routing instance to use a route distinguisher:
    [edit routing-instances]

    user@switchPE1# set routing-instance-name route-distinguisher address
  18. Configure the VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) target of the routing instance:
    [edit routing-instances]

    user@switchPE1# set routing-instance-name vrf-target community
    Note

    You can create more complex policies by explicitly configuring VRF import and export policies using the import and export options. See the Junos OS VPNs Configuration Guide.

  19. Configure the protocols and encapsulation type used by the routing instance:
    [edit routing-instances]

    user@switchPE1# set routing-instance-name protocols l2vpn encapsulation-type ethernet-vlan
  20. Apply the routing instance to a customer edge interface and specify a description for it:
    [edit routing-instances]

    user@switchPE1# set routing-instance-name protocols interface interface-name description description
  21. Configure the routing-instance protocols site:
    [edit routing-instances]

    user@switchPE1# set routing-instance-name protocols l2vpn site site-name site-identifier identifier remote-site-id identifier
    Note

    The remote site ID (configured with the remote-site-id statement) corresponds to the site ID (configured with the site-identifier statement) configured on the other PE switch.

When you have completed configuring one PE switch, follow the same procedures to configure the other PE switch.

Note

You must use the same type of switch for the other PE switch. You cannot use an EX8200 as one PE switch and use an EX3200 or EX4200 as the other PE switch.

Related Documentation

Release History Table
Release
Description
Starting in Junos OS Release 20.1R1, aggregated Ethernet interfaces support VLAN translational cross-connect (TCC) encapsulation.
Starting in Junos OS Release 19.3R1, you can leverage the hardware support available for cross-connects on the ACX5448 device with the Layer 2 local switching functionality using certain models. With this support, you can provide the EVP and Ethernet Virtual Private Line (EVPL) services.
Support for VPN service as the customer is supported on QFX10000 switches starting with Junos OS Release 17.1R1.