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Configuring DCBX Autonegotiation

 

Data Center Bridging Capability Exchange protocol (DCBX) discovers the data center bridging (DCB) capabilities of peers by exchanging feature configuration information. DCBX also detects feature misconfiguration and mismatches, and can configure DCB on peers. DCBX is an extension of the Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP), and LLDP must remain enabled on every interface for which you want to use DCBX. If you attempt to enable DCBX on an interface on which LLDP is disabled, the configuration commit operation fails.

Note

LLDP and DCBX are enabled by default on all interfaces.

The switch supports DCBX autonegotiation for:

  • Priority-based flow control (PFC) configuration

  • Layer 2 and Layer 4 applications such as Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) and Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI)

  • Enhanced transmission selection (ETS) advertisement

DCBX autonegotiation is configured on a per-interface basis for each supported feature or application. The PFC and application DCBX exchanges use autonegotiation by default. The default autonegotiation behavior is:

  • DCBX is enabled on the interface if the connected peer device also supports DCBX.

  • DCBX is disabled on the interface if the connected peer device does not support DCBX.

You can override the default behavior for each feature by turning off autonegotiation to force an interface to enable or disable the feature.

Autonegotiation of ETS means that when ETS is enabled on an interface (priority groups are configured), the interface advertises its ETS configuration to the peer device. In this case, priorities (forwarding classes) that are not part of a priority group (forwarding class set) receive no bandwidth and are advertised in an automatically generated default forwarding class. If ETS is not enabled on an interface (no priority groups are configured), all of the priorities are advertised in one automatically generated default priority group that receives 100 percent of the port bandwidth.

Disabling ETS autonegotiation prevents the interface from sending the Recommendation TLV or the Configuration TLV to the connected peer.

On interfaces that use IEEE DCBX mode to exchange DCBX parameters, you can disable autonegotiation of the ETS Recommendation TLV to the peer if you want an asymmetric ETS configuration between the peers. DCBX still exchanges the ETS Configuration TLV if you disable the ETS Recommendation TLV.

Autonegotiation of PFC means that when PFC is enabled on an interface, if the peer device connected to the interface supports PFC and is provisioned compatibly with the switch, DCBX sets the PFC operational state to enabled. If the peer device connected to the interface does not support PFC or is not provisioned compatibly with the switch, DCBX sets the operational state to disabled.

In addition, if the peer advertises that it is “willing” to learn its PFC configuration from the switch, DCBX pushes the switch’s PFC configuration to the peer and does not check the peer’s administrative state. The switch does not learn PFC configuration from peers (the switch does not advertise its state as “willing”).

Disabling PFC autonegotiation prevents the interface from exchanging PFC configuration information with the peer. It forces the interface to enable PFC if PFC is configured on the interface or to disable PFC if PFC is not configured on the interface. If you disable PFC autonegotiation, the assumption is that the peer is also configured manually.

Autonegotiation of applications depends on whether or not you apply an application map to an interface. If you apply an application map to an interface, the interface autonegotiates DCBX for each application in the application map. PFC must be enabled on the FCoE priority (the FCoE IEEE 802.1p code point) for the interface to advertise the FCoE application. The interface only advertises applications that are included in the application map.

For example, if you apply an application map to an interface and the application map does not include the FCoE application, then that interface does not perform DCBX advertisement of FCoE.

If you do not apply an application map to an interface, DCBX does not advertise applications on that interface, with the exception of FCoE, which is handled differently than other applications.

Note

If you do not apply an application map to an interface, the interface performs autonegotiation of FCoE if the interface carries traffic in the FCoE forwarding class and also has PFC enabled on the FCoE priority. On such interfaces, if DCBX detects that the peer device connected to the interface supports FCoE, the switch advertises its FCoE capability and IEEE 802.1p code point on that interface. If DCBX detects that the peer device connected to the interface does not support FCoE, DCBX marks that interface as “FCoE down” and disables FCoE on the interface.

When DCBX marks an interface as “FCoE down,” the behavior of the switch depends on how you use it in the network:

  • When the switch acts as an FCoE transit switch, the interface drops all of the FIP packets it receives. In addition, FIP packets received from an FCoE forwarder (FCF) are not forwarded to interfaces marked as “FCoE down.”

  • When the switch acts as an FCoE-FC gateway (only switches that support native Fibre Channel interfaces), it does not send or receive FCoE Initialization Protocol (FIP) packets.

Disabling autonegotiation prevents the interface from exchanging application information with the peer. In this case, the assumption is that the peer is also configured manually.

To disable DCBX autonegotiation of PFC, applications (including FCoE), and ETS using the CLI:

  1. Turn off autonegotiation for PFC.
    [edit]

    user@switch# set protocols dcbx interface interface-name priority-flow-control no-auto-negotiation



  2. Turn off autonegotiation for applications.
    [edit]

    user@switch# set protocols dcbx interface interface-name applications no-auto-negotiation



  3. Turn off autonegotiation for ETS.
    [edit]

    user@switch# set protocols dcbx interface interface-name enhanced-transmission-selection no-auto-negotiation



To disable autonegotiation of the ETS Recommendation TLV so that DCBX exchanges only the ETS Configuration TLV:

  • [edit protocols dcbx interface interface-name]

    user@switch# set enhanced-transmission-selection no-recommendation-tlv