Help us improve your experience.

Let us know what you think.

Do you have time for a two-minute survey?

 

show interfaces

 

List of Syntax

Syntax (Gigabit Ethernet)

Syntax (10 Gigabit Ethernet)

Syntax (SRX Series Devices and (vSRX and vSRX 3.0 platforms))

Syntax (Gigabit Ethernet)

Syntax (10 Gigabit Ethernet)

Syntax (SRX Series Devices and (vSRX and vSRX 3.0 platforms))

Release Information

Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4 for Gigabit interfaces.

Command introduced in Junos OS Release 8.0 for 10 Gigabit interfaces.

Command modified in Junos OS Release 9.5 for SRX Series devices.

Command introduced in Junos OS Release 18.1 for Gigabit interfaces.

Command modified in Junos OS Release 19.3R1 for MX Series Routers.

Starting in Junos OS Release 19.3R1, Output fields Ifindex and speed is modified in the show interfaces interface name extensive command, on all MX Series routers.

  • The default behavior of WAN-PHY interface remains the same.The new precise-bandwidth option reflects the new speed (9.294-Gbps) configured on the supported line cards.

  • The WAN-PHY framing mode is supported only on MPC5E and MPC6E line cards.

Starting in Junos OS Release 19.3R1, class of service (CoS) features can be configured on the physical interface with speed rates of 1-Gbps, 10-Gbps, 40-Gbps, and 100-Gbps to provide better bandwidth for processing traffic during congestion using variant speeds.

Description

Display status information about the specified Gigabit Ethernet interface.

(M320, M120, MX Series, and T Series routers only) Display status information about the specified 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface.

Display the IPv6 interface traffic statistics about the specified Gigabit Ethernet interface for MX series routers. The input and output bytes (bps) and packets (pps) rates are not displayed for IFD and local traffic.

Display status information and statistics about interfaces on SRX Series, vSRX, and vSRX 3.0 platforms running Junos OS.

Note

On SRX Series appliances, on configuring identical IPs on a single interface, you will not see a warning message; instead, you will see a syslog message.

Starting in Junos OS Release 18.4R1, Output fields Next-hop and vpls-status is displayed in the show interfaces interface name detail command, only for Layer 2 protocols on MX480 routers.

Options

For Gigabit interfaces:

ge-fpc/pic/portDisplay standard information about the specified Gigabit Ethernet interface.
Note

Interfaces with different speeds are named uniformly with ge-0/0/x for backward compatibility. Use the show interfaces command to view the interface speeds.

brief | detail | extensive | terse(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
descriptions(Optional) Display interface description strings.
media(Optional) Display media-specific information about network interfaces.
snmp-index snmp-index(Optional) Display information for the specified SNMP index of the interface.
statistics(Optional) Display static interface statistics.

For 10 Gigabit interfaces:

xe-fpc/pic/portDisplay standard information about the specified 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface.
brief | detail | extensive | terse(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
descriptions(Optional) Display interface description strings.
media(Optional) Display media-specific information about network interfaces.
snmp-index snmp-index(Optional) Display information for the specified SNMP index of the interface.
statistics(Optional) Display static interface statistics.

For SRX interfaces:

  • interface-name—(Optional) Display standard information about the specified interface. Following is a list of typical interface names. Replace pim with the PIM slot and port with the port number.

    • at- pim/0/port—ATM-over-ADSL or ATM-over-SHDSL interface.

    • ce1-pim/0/ port—Channelized E1 interface.

    • cl-0/0/8—3G wireless modem interface for SRX320 devices.

    • ct1-pim/0/port—Channelized T1 interface.

    • dl0—Dialer Interface for initiating ISDN and USB modem connections.

    • e1-pim/0/port—E1 interface.

    • e3-pim/0/port—E3 interface.

    • fe-pim/0/port—Fast Ethernet interface.

    • ge-pim/0/port—Gigabit Ethernet interface.

    • se-pim/0/port—Serial interface.

    • t1-pim/0/port—T1 (also called DS1) interface.

    • t3-pim/0/port—T3 (also called DS3) interface.

    • wx-slot/0/0—WAN acceleration interface, for the WXC Integrated Services Module (ISM 200).

    • interface-name—(Optional) Display standard information about the specified interface. Following is a list of typical interface names. Replace pim with the PIM slot and port with the port number.

      • at- pim/0/port—ATM-over-ADSL or ATM-over-SHDSL interface.

      • ce1-pim/0/ port—Channelized E1 interface.

      • cl-0/0/8—3G wireless modem interface for SRX320 devices.

      • ct1-pim/0/port—Channelized T1 interface.

      • dl0—Dialer Interface for initiating ISDN and USB modem connections.

      • e1-pim/0/port—E1 interface.

      • e3-pim/0/port—E3 interface.

      • fe-pim/0/port—Fast Ethernet interface.

      • ge-pim/0/port—Gigabit Ethernet interface.

      • se-pim/0/port—Serial interface.

      • t1-pim/0/port—T1 (also called DS1) interface.

      • t3-pim/0/port—T3 (also called DS3) interface.

      • wx-slot/0/0—WAN acceleration interface, for the WXC Integrated Services Module (ISM 200).

Additional Information

In a logical system, this command displays information only about the logical interfaces and not about the physical interfaces.

Required Privilege Level

view

List of Sample Output

show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet)

show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet on MX Series Routers)

show interfaces (link degrade status)

show interfaces extensive (Gigabit Ethernet on MX Series Routers showing interface transmit statistics configuration)

show interfaces brief (Gigabit Ethernet)

show interfaces detail (Gigabit Ethernet)

show interfaces extensive (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2)

show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet Unnumbered Interface)

show interfaces (ACI Interface Set Configured)

show interfaces (ALI Interface Set)

show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, IQ2)

show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, WAN PHY Mode)

show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, DWDM OTN PIC)

show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, Unidirectional Mode)

show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, Unidirectional Mode, Transmit-Only)

show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, Unidirectional Mode, Receive-Only)

Sample Output SRX Gigabit Ethernet

Sample Output SRX Gigabit Ethernet

show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet for vSRX and vSRX 3.0)

show interfaces detail (Gigabit Ethernet)

show interfaces statistics st0.0 detail

show interfaces extensive (Gigabit Ethernet)

show interfaces terse

show interfaces terse (vSRX and vSRX 3.0)

show interfaces controller (Channelized E1 IQ with Logical E1)

show interfaces controller (Channelized E1 IQ with Logical DS0)

show interfaces descriptions

show interfaces destination-class all

show interfaces diagnostics optics

show interfaces far-end-interval coc12-5/2/0

show interfaces far-end-interval coc1-5/2/1:1

show interfaces filters

show interfaces flow-statistics (Gigabit Ethernet)

show interfaces interval (Channelized OC12)

show interfaces interval (E3)

show interfaces interval (SONET/SDH) (SRX devices)

show interfaces load-balancing (SRX devices)

show interfaces load-balancing detail (SRX devices)

show interfaces mac-database (All MAC Addresses on a Port SRX devices)

show interfaces mac-database (All MAC Addresses on a Service SRX devices)

show interfaces mac-database mac-address

show interfaces mc-ae (SRX devices)

show interfaces media (SONET/SDH)

show interfaces policers (SRX devices)

show interfaces policers interface-name (SRX devices)

show interfaces queue (SRX devices)

show interfaces redundancy (SRX devices)

show interfaces redundancy (Aggregated Ethernet SRX devices)

show interfaces redundancy detail (SRX devices)

show interfaces routing brief (SRX devices)

show interfaces routing detail (SRX devices)

show interfaces routing-instance all (SRX devices)

show interfaces snmp-index (SRX devices)

show interfaces source-class all (SRX devices)

show interfaces statistics (Fast Ethernet SRX devices)

show interfaces switch-port (SRX devices)

show interfaces transport pm (SRX devices)

show security zones (SRX devices)

Output Fields

Table 1 describes the output fields for the show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear. For Gigabit Ethernet IQ and IQE PICs, the traffic and MAC statistics vary by interface type. For more information, see Table 2.

Table 1: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields

Field Name

Field Description

Level of Output

Physical Interface 

Physical interface

Name of the physical interface.

All levels

Enabled

State of the interface. Possible values are described in the “Enabled Field” section under Common Output Fields Description.

All levels

Interface index

Index number of the physical interface, which reflects its initialization sequence.

detail extensive none

SNMP ifIndex

SNMP index number for the physical interface.

detail extensive none

Generation

Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.

detail extensive

Link-level type

Encapsulation being used on the physical interface.

All levels

MTU

Maximum transmission unit size on the physical interface.

All levels

Speed

Speed at which the interface is running.

All levels

Loopback

Loopback status: Enabled or Disabled. If loopback is enabled, type of loopback: Local or Remote.

All levels

Source filtering

Source filtering status: Enabled or Disabled.

All levels

LAN-PHY mode

10-Gigabit Ethernet interface operating in Local Area Network Physical Layer Device (LAN PHY) mode. LAN PHY allows 10-Gigabit Ethernet wide area links to use existing Ethernet applications.

All levels

WAN-PHY mode

10-Gigabit Ethernet interface operating in Wide Area Network Physical Layer Device (WAN PHY) mode. WAN PHY allows 10-Gigabit Ethernet wide area links to use fiber-optic cables and other devices intended for SONET/SDH.

All levels

Unidirectional

Unidirectional link mode status for 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface: Enabled or Disabled for parent interface; Rx-only or Tx-only for child interfaces.

All levels

Flow control

Flow control status: Enabled or Disabled.

All levels

Auto-negotiation

(Gigabit Ethernet interfaces) Autonegotiation status: Enabled or Disabled.

All levels

Remote-fault

(Gigabit Ethernet interfaces) Remote fault status:

  • Online—Autonegotiation is manually configured as online.

  • Offline—Autonegotiation is manually configured as offline.

All levels

Device flags

Information about the physical device. Possible values are described in the “Device Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.

All levels

Interface flags

Information about the interface. Possible values are described in the “Interface Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.

All levels

Link flags

Information about the link. Possible values are described in the “Links Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.

All levels

Wavelength

(10-Gigabit Ethernet dense wavelength-division multiplexing [DWDM] interfaces) Displays the configured wavelength, in nanometers (nm).

All levels

Frequency

(10-Gigabit Ethernet DWDM interfaces only) Displays the frequency associated with the configured wavelength, in terahertz (THz).

All levels

CoS queues

Number of CoS queues configured.

detail extensive none

Schedulers

(Gigabit Ethernet intelligent queuing 2 [IQ2] interfaces only) Number of CoS schedulers configured.

extensive

Hold-times

Current interface hold-time up and hold-time down, in milliseconds (ms).

detail extensive

Current address

Configured MAC address.

detail extensive none

Hardware address

Hardware MAC address.

detail extensive none

Last flapped

Date, time, and how long ago the interface went from down to up. The format is Last flapped: year-month-day hour:minute:second:timezone (hour:minute:second ago). For example, Last flapped: 2002-04-26 10:52:40 PDT (04:33:20 ago).

detail extensive none

Input Rate

Input rate in bits per second (bps) and packets per second (pps). The value in this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for ingress traffic on Ethernet interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the logical interface level.

None

Output Rate

Output rate in bps and pps. The value in this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for egress traffic on Ethernet interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the logical interface level.

None

Statistics last cleared

Time when the statistics for the interface were last set to zero.

detail extensive

Egress account overhead

Layer 2 overhead in bytes that is accounted in the interface statistics for egress traffic.

detail extensive

Ingress account overhead

Layer 2 overhead in bytes that is accounted in the interface statistics for ingress traffic.

detail extensive

Traffic statistics

Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the physical interface.

  • Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface. The value in this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for ingress traffic on Ethernet interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the logical interface level.

  • Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface. The value in this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for egress traffic on Ethernet interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the logical interface level.

  • Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface.

  • Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.

Gigabit Ethernet and 10-Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs count the overhead and CRC bytes.

For Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs, the input byte counts vary by interface type. For more information, see Table 31 under the show interfaces command.

detail extensive

Input errors

Input errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters whose meaning might not be obvious:

  • Errors—Sum of the incoming frame aborts and FCS errors.

  • Drops—Number of packets dropped by the input queue of the I/O Manager ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.

  • Framing errors—Number of packets received with an invalid frame checksum (FCS).

  • Runts—Number of frames received that are smaller than the runt threshold.

  • Policed discards—Number of frames that the incoming packet match code discarded because they were not recognized or not of interest. Usually, this field reports protocols that Junos OS does not handle.

  • L3 incompletes—Number of incoming packets discarded because they failed Layer 3 (usually IPv4) sanity checks of the header. For example, a frame with less than 20 bytes of available IP header is discarded. L3 incomplete errors can be ignored by configuring the ignore-l3-incompletes statement.

  • L2 channel errors—Number of times the software did not find a valid logical interface for an incoming frame.

  • L2 mismatch timeouts—Number of malformed or short packets that caused the incoming packet handler to discard the frame as unreadable.

  • FIFO errors—Number of FIFO errors in the receive direction that are reported by the ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably malfunctioning.

  • Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.

extensive

Output errors

Output errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters whose meaning might not be obvious:

  • Carrier transitions—Number of times the interface has gone from down to up. This number does not normally increment quickly, increasing only when the cable is unplugged, the far-end system is powered down and then up, or another problem occurs. If the number of carrier transitions increments quickly (perhaps once every 10 seconds), the cable, the far-end system, or the PIC or PIM is malfunctioning.

  • Errors—Sum of the outgoing frame aborts and FCS errors.

  • Drops—Number of packets dropped by the output queue of the I/O Manager ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.

    Note: Due to accounting space limitations on certain Type 3 FPCs (which are supported in M320 and T640 routers), the Drops field does not always use the correct value for queue 6 or queue 7 for interfaces on 10-port 1-Gigabit Ethernet PICs.

  • Collisions—Number of Ethernet collisions. The Gigabit Ethernet PIC supports only full-duplex operation, so for Gigabit Ethernet PICs, this number must always be 0. If it is nonzero, there is a software bug.

  • Aged packets—Number of packets that remained in shared packet SDRAM so long that the system automatically purged them. The value in this field must never increment. If it does, it is most likely a software bug or possibly malfunctioning hardware.

  • FIFO errors—Number of FIFO errors in the send direction as reported by the ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably malfunctioning.

  • HS link CRC errors—Number of errors on the high-speed links between the ASICs responsible for handling the router interfaces.

  • MTU errors—Number of packets whose size exceeded the MTU of the interface.

  • Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.

extensive

Egress queues

Total number of egress queues supported on the specified interface.

Note: In DPCs that are not of the enhanced type, such as DPC 40x 1GE R, DPCE 20x 1GE + 2x 10GE R, or DPCE 40x 1GE R, you might notice a discrepancy in the output of the show interfaces command because incoming packets might be counted in the Egress queues section of the output. This problem occurs on non-enhanced DPCs because the egress queue statistics are polled from IMQ (Inbound Message Queuing) block of the I-chip. The IMQ block does not differentiate between ingress and egress WAN traffic; as a result, the combined statistics are displayed in the egress queue counters on the Routing Engine. In a simple VPLS scenario, if there is no MAC entry in DMAC table (by sending unidirectional traffic), traffic is flooded and the input traffic is accounted in IMQ. For bidirectional traffic (MAC entry in DMAC table), if the outgoing interface is on the same I-chip then both ingress and egress statistics are counted in a combined way. If the outgoing interface is on a different I-chip or FPC, then only egress statistics are accounted in IMQ. This behavior is expected with non-enhanced DPCs

detail extensive

Queue counters (Egress)

CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name.

  • Queued packets—Number of queued packets.

  • Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.

  • Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.

    Note: Due to accounting space limitations on certain Type 3 FPCs (which are supported in M320 and T640 routers), the Dropped packets field does not always display the correct value for queue 6 or queue 7 for interfaces on 10-port 1-Gigabit Ethernet PICs.

detail extensive

Ingress queues

Total number of ingress queues supported on the specified interface. Displayed on IQ2 interfaces.

extensive

Queue counters (Ingress)

CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name. Displayed on IQ2 interfaces.

  • Queued packets—Number of queued packets.

  • Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.

  • Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.

extensive

Active alarms and Active defects

Ethernet-specific defects that can prevent the interface from passing packets. When a defect persists for a certain amount of time, it is promoted to an alarm. Based on the router configuration, an alarm can ring the red or yellow alarm bell on the router, or turn on the red or yellow alarm LED on the craft interface. These fields can contain the value None or Link.

  • None—There are no active defects or alarms.

  • Link—Interface has lost its link state, which usually means that the cable is unplugged, the far-end system has been turned off, or the PIC is malfunctioning.

detail extensive none

Interface transmit statistics

(On MX Series devices) Status of the interface-transmit-statistics configuration: Enabled or Disabled.

  • Enabled—When the interface-transmit-statistics statement is included in the configuration. If this is configured, the interface statistics show the actual transmitted load on the interface.

  • Disabled—When the interface-transmit-statistics statement is not included in the configuration. If this is not configured, the interface statistics show the offered load on the interface.

detail extensive

OTN FEC statistics

The forward error correction (FEC) counters provide the following statistics:

  • Corrected Errors—Count of corrected errors in the last second.

  • Corrected Error Ratio—Corrected error ratio in the last 25 seconds. For example, 1e-7 is 1 error per 10 million bits.

detail extensive

PCS statistics

(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces) Displays Physical Coding Sublayer (PCS) fault conditions from the WAN PHY or the LAN PHY device.

  • Bit errors—Number of seconds during which at least one bit error rate (BER) occurred while the PCS receiver is operating in normal mode.

  • Errored blocks—Number of seconds when at least one errored block occurred while the PCS receiver is operating in normal mode.

detail extensive

Link Degrade

Shows the link degrade status of the physical link and the estimated bit error rates (BERs). This field is available only for the PICs supporting the physical link monitoring feature.

  • Link Monitoring—Indicates if physical link degrade monitoring is enabled on the interface.

    • Enable—Indicates that link degrade monitoring has been enabled (using the link-degrade-monitor statement) on the interface.

    • Disable—Indicates that link degrade monitoring has not been enabled on the interface. If link degrade monitoring has not been enabled, the output does not show any related information, such as BER values and thresholds.

  • Link Degrade Set Threshold—The BER threshold value at which the link is considered degraded and a corrective action is triggered.

  • Link Degrade Clear Threshold—The BER threshold value at which the degraded link is considered recovered and the corrective action applied to the interface is reverted.

  • Estimated BER—The estimated bit error rate.

  • Link-degrade event—Shows link degrade event information.

    • Seconds—Time (in seconds) elapsed after a link degrade event occurred.

    • Count—The number of link degrade events recorded.

    • State—Shows the link degrade status (example: Defect Active).

detail extensive

MAC statistics

Receive and Transmit statistics reported by the PIC's MAC subsystem, including the following:

  • Total octets and total packets—Total number of octets and packets. For Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs, the received octets count varies by interface type. For more information, see Table 31 under the show interfaces command.

  • Unicast packets, Broadcast packets, and Multicast packets—Number of unicast, broadcast, and multicast packets.

  • CRC/Align errors—Total number of packets received that had a length (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets) of between 64 and 1518 octets, inclusive, and had either a bad FCS with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error).

  • FIFO error—Number of FIFO errors that are reported by the ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC or a cable is probably malfunctioning.

  • MAC control frames—Number of MAC control frames.

  • MAC pause frames—Number of MAC control frames with pause operational code.

  • Oversized frames—There are two possible conditions regarding the number of oversized frames:

    • Packet length exceeds interface MTU, or

    • Packet length exceeds MRU

  • Jabber frames—Number of frames that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets), and had either an FCS error or an alignment error. This definition of jabber is different from the definition in IEEE-802.3 section 8.2.1.5 (10BASE5) and section 10.3.1.4 (10BASE2). These documents define jabber as the condition in which any packet exceeds 20 ms. The allowed range to detect jabber is from 20 ms to 150 ms.

  • Fragment frames—Total number of packets that were less than 64 octets in length (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets) and had either an FCS error or an alignment error. Fragment frames normally increment because both runts (which are normal occurrences caused by collisions) and noise hits are counted.

  • VLAN tagged frames—Number of frames that are VLAN tagged. The system uses the TPID of 0x8100 in the frame to determine whether a frame is tagged or not.

    Note: The 20-port Gigabit Ethernet MIC (MIC-3D-20GE-SFP) does not have hardware counters for VLAN frames. Therefore, the VLAN tagged frames field displays 0 when the show interfaces command is executed on a 20-port Gigabit Ethernet MIC. In other words, the number of VLAN tagged frames cannot be determined for the 20-port Gigabit Ethernet MIC.

  • Code violations—Number of times an event caused the PHY to indicate “Data reception error” or “invalid data symbol error.”

extensive

OTN Received Overhead Bytes

APS/PCC0: 0x02, APS/PCC1: 0x11, APS/PCC2: 0x47, APS/PCC3: 0x58 Payload Type: 0x08

extensive

OTN Transmitted Overhead Bytes

APS/PCC0: 0x00, APS/PCC1: 0x00, APS/PCC2: 0x00, APS/PCC3: 0x00 Payload Type: 0x08

extensive

Filter statistics

Receive and Transmit statistics reported by the PIC's MAC address filter subsystem. The filtering is done by the content-addressable memory (CAM) on the PIC. The filter examines a packet's source and destination MAC addresses to determine whether the packet may enter the system or be rejected.

  • Input packet count—Number of packets received from the MAC hardware that the filter processed.

  • Input packet rejects—Number of packets that the filter rejected because of either the source MAC address or the destination MAC address.

  • Input DA rejects—Number of packets that the filter rejected because the destination MAC address of the packet is not on the accept list. It is normal for this value to increment. When it increments very quickly and no traffic is entering the router from the far-end system, either there is a bad ARP entry on the far-end system, or multicast routing is not on and the far-end system is sending many multicast packets to the local router (which the router is rejecting).

  • Input SA rejects—Number of packets that the filter rejected because the source MAC address of the packet is not on the accept list. The value in this field must increment only if source MAC address filtering has been enabled. If filtering is enabled, if the value increments quickly, and if the system is not receiving traffic that it should from the far-end system, it means that the user-configured source MAC addresses for this interface are incorrect.

  • Output packet count—Number of packets that the filter has given to the MAC hardware.

  • Output packet pad count—Number of packets the filter padded to the minimum Ethernet size (60 bytes) before giving the packet to the MAC hardware. Usually, padding is done only on small ARP packets, but some very small IP packets can also require padding. If this value increments rapidly, either the system is trying to find an ARP entry for a far-end system that does not exist or it is misconfigured.

  • Output packet error count—Number of packets with an indicated error that the filter was given to transmit. These packets are usually aged packets or are the result of a bandwidth problem on the FPC hardware. On a normal system, the value of this field must not increment.

  • CAM destination filters, CAM source filters—Number of entries in the CAM dedicated to destination and source MAC address filters. There can only be up to 64 source entries. If source filtering is disabled, which is the default, the values for these fields must be 0.

extensive

PMA PHY

(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) SONET error information:

  • Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.

  • Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.

  • State—State of the error. Any state other than OK indicates a problem.

Subfields are:

  • PHY Lock—Phase-locked loop

  • PHY Light—Loss of optical signal

extensive

WIS section

(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) SONET error information:

  • Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.

  • Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.

  • State—State of the error. Any state other than OK indicates a problem.

Subfields are:

  • BIP-B1—Bit interleaved parity for SONET section overhead

  • SEF—Severely errored framing

  • LOL—Loss of light

  • LOF—Loss of frame

  • ES-S—Errored seconds (section)

  • SES-S—Severely errored seconds (section)

  • SEFS-S—Severely errored framing seconds (section)

extensive

WIS line

(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) Active alarms and defects, plus counts of specific SONET errors with detailed information:

  • Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.

  • Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.

  • State—State of the error. Any state other than OK indicates a problem.

Subfields are:

  • BIP-B2—Bit interleaved parity for SONET line overhead

  • REI-L—Remote error indication (near-end line)

  • RDI-L—Remote defect indication (near-end line)

  • AIS-L—Alarm indication signal (near-end line)

  • BERR-SF—Bit error rate fault (signal failure)

  • BERR-SD—Bit error rate defect (signal degradation)

  • ES-L—Errored seconds (near-end line)

  • SES-L—Severely errored seconds (near-end line)

  • UAS-L—Unavailable seconds (near-end line)

  • ES-LFE—Errored seconds (far-end line)

  • SES-LFE—Severely errored seconds (far-end line)

  • UAS-LFE—Unavailable seconds (far-end line)

extensive

WIS path

(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) Active alarms and defects, plus counts of specific SONET errors with detailed information:

  • Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.

  • Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.

  • State—State of the error. Any state other than OK indicates a problem.

Subfields are:

  • BIP-B3—Bit interleaved parity for SONET section overhead

  • REI-P—Remote error indication

  • LOP-P—Loss of pointer (path)

  • AIS-P—Path alarm indication signal

  • RDI-P—Path remote defect indication

  • UNEQ-P—Path unequipped

  • PLM-P—Path payload (signal) label mismatch

  • ES-P—Errored seconds (near-end STS path)

  • SES-P—Severely errored seconds (near-end STS path)

  • UAS-P—Unavailable seconds (near-end STS path)

  • SES-PFE—Severely errored seconds (far-end STS path)

  • UAS-PFE—Unavailable seconds (far-end STS path)

extensive

Autonegotiation information

Information about link autonegotiation.

  • Negotiation status:

    • Incomplete—Ethernet interface has the speed or link mode configured.

    • No autonegotiation—Remote Ethernet interface has the speed or link mode configured, or does not perform autonegotiation.

    • Complete—Ethernet interface is connected to a device that performs autonegotiation and the autonegotiation process is successful.

  • Link partner statusOK when Ethernet interface is connected to a device that performs autonegotiation and the autonegotiation process is successful.

  • Link partner—Information from the remote Ethernet device:

    • Link mode—Depending on the capability of the link partner, either Full-duplex or Half-duplex.

    • Flow control—Types of flow control supported by the link partner. For Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, types are Symmetric (link partner supports PAUSE on receive and transmit), Asymmetric (link partner supports PAUSE on transmit), Symmetric/Asymmetric (link partner supports PAUSE on receive and transmit or only PAUSE on transmit), and None (link partner does not support flow control).

    • Remote fault—Remote fault information from the link partner—Failure indicates a receive link error. OK indicates that the link partner is receiving. Negotiation error indicates a negotiation error. Offline indicates that the link partner is going offline.

  • Local resolution—Information from the local Ethernet device:

    • Flow control—Types of flow control supported by the local device. For Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, advertised capabilities are Symmetric/Asymmetric (local device supports PAUSE on receive and transmit or only PAUSE on receive) and None (local device does not support flow control). Depending on the result of the negotiation with the link partner, local resolution flow control type will display Symmetric (local device supports PAUSE on receive and transmit), Asymmetric (local device supports PAUSE on receive), and None (local device does not support flow control).

    • Remote fault—Remote fault information. Link OK (no error detected on receive), Offline (local interface is offline), and Link Failure (link error detected on receive).

extensive

Received path trace, Transmitted path trace

(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) SONET/SDH interfaces allow path trace bytes to be sent inband across the SONET/SDH link. Juniper Networks and other router manufacturers use these bytes to help diagnose misconfigurations and network errors by setting the transmitted path trace message so that it contains the system hostname and name of the physical interface. The received path trace value is the message received from the router at the other end of the fiber. The transmitted path trace value is the message that this router transmits.

extensive

Packet Forwarding Engine configuration

Information about the configuration of the Packet Forwarding Engine:

  • Destination slot—FPC slot number.

extensive

CoS information

Information about the CoS queue for the physical interface.

  • CoS transmit queue—Queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name.

  • Bandwidth %—Percentage of bandwidth allocated to the queue.

  • Bandwidth bps—Bandwidth allocated to the queue (in bps).

  • Buffer %—Percentage of buffer space allocated to the queue.

  • Buffer usec—Amount of buffer space allocated to the queue, in microseconds. This value is nonzero only if the buffer size is configured in terms of time.

  • Priority—Queue priority: low or high.

  • Limit—Displayed if rate limiting is configured for the queue. Possible values are none and exact. If exact is configured, the queue transmits only up to the configured bandwidth, even if excess bandwidth is available. If none is configured, the queue transmits beyond the configured bandwidth if bandwidth is available.

extensive

Logical Interface  

Logical interface

Name of the logical interface.

All levels

Index

Index number of the logical interface, which reflects its initialization sequence.

detail extensive none

SNMP ifIndex

SNMP interface index number for the logical interface.

detail extensive none

Generation

Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.

detail extensive

Flags

Information about the logical interface. Possible values are described in the “Logical Interface Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.

All levels

VLAN-Tag

Rewrite profile applied to incoming or outgoing frames on the outer (Out) VLAN tag or for both the outer and inner (In) VLAN tags.

  • push—An outer VLAN tag is pushed in front of the existing VLAN tag.

  • pop—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is removed.

  • swap—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is overwritten with the user-specified VLAN tag information.

  • push—An outer VLAN tag is pushed in front of the existing VLAN tag.

  • push-push—Two VLAN tags are pushed in from the incoming frame.

  • swap-push—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is replaced by a user-specified VLAN tag value. A user-specified outer VLAN tag is pushed in front. The outer tag becomes an inner tag in the final frame.

  • swap-swap—Both the inner and the outer VLAN tags of the incoming frame are replaced by the user-specified VLAN tag value.

  • pop-swap—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is removed, and the inner VLAN tag of the incoming frame is replaced by the user-specified VLAN tag value. The inner tag becomes the outer tag in the final frame.

  • pop-pop—Both the outer and inner VLAN tags of the incoming frame are removed.

brief detail extensive none

Demux

IP demultiplexing (demux) value that appears if this interface is used as the demux underlying interface. The output is one of the following:

  • Source Family Inet

  • Destination Family Inet

detail extensive none

Encapsulation

Encapsulation on the logical interface.

All levels

ACI VLAN

Information displayed for agent circuit identifier (ACI) interface set configured with the agent-circuit-id autoconfiguration stanza.

Dynamic Profile—Name of the dynamic profile that defines the ACI interface set.

If configured, the ACI interface set enables the underlying Ethernet interface to create dynamic VLAN subscriber interfaces based on ACI information.

Note: The ACI VLAN field is replaced with the Line Identity field when an ALI interface set is configured with the line-identity autoconfiguration stanza.

brief detail extensive none

Line Identity

Information displayed for access-line-identifier (ALI) interface sets configured with the line-identity autoconfiguration stanza.

  • Dynamic Profile—Name of the dynamic profile that defines the ALI interface set.

  • Trusted option used to create the ALI interface set: Circuit-id, Remote-id, or Accept-no-ids. More than one option can be configured.

If configured, the ALI interface set enables the underlying Ethernet interface to create dynamic VLAN subscriber interfaces based on ALI information.

Note: The Line Identity field is replaced with the ACI VLAN field when an ACI interface set is configured with the agent-circuit-id autoconfiguration stanza.

detail

Protocol

Protocol family. Possible values are described in the “Protocol Field” section under Common Output Fields Description.

detail extensive none

MTU

Maximum transmission unit size on the logical interface.

detail extensive none

Neighbor Discovery Protocol (NDP)Queue Statistics

NDP statistics for protocol inet6 under logical interface statistics.

  • Max nh cache—Maximum interface neighbor discovery nexthop cache size.

  • New hold nh limit—Maximum number of new unresolved nexthops.

  • Curr nh cnt—Current number of resolved nexthops in the NDP queue.

  • Curr new hold cnt—Current number of unresolved nexthops in the NDP queue.

  • NH drop cnt—Number of NDP requests not serviced.

All levels

Dynamic Profile

Name of the dynamic profile that was used to create this interface configured with a Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE) family.

detail extensive none

Service Name Table

Name of the service name table for the interface configured with a PPPoE family.

detail extensive none

Max Sessions

Maximum number of PPPoE logical interfaces that can be activated on the underlying interface.

detail extensive none

Duplicate Protection

State of PPPoE duplicate protection: On or Off. When duplicate protection is configured for the underlying interface, a dynamic PPPoE logical interface cannot be activated when an existing active logical interface is present for the same PPPoE client.

detail extensive none

Direct Connect

State of the configuration to ignore DSL Forum VSAs: On or Off. When configured, the router ignores any of these VSAs received from a directly connected CPE device on the interface.

detail extensive none

AC Name

Name of the access concentrator.

detail extensive none

Maximum labels

Maximum number of MPLS labels configured for the MPLS protocol family on the logical interface.

detail extensive none

Traffic statistics

Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the specified interface set.

  • Input bytes, Output bytes—Number of bytes received and transmitted on the interface set. The value in this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for ingress or egress traffic on Ethernet interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the logical interface level.

  • Input packets, Output packets—Number of packets received and transmitted on the interface set.

detail extensive

IPv6 transit statistics

Number of IPv6 transit bytes and packets received and transmitted on the logical interface if IPv6 statistics tracking is enabled.

extensive

Local statistics

Number and rate of bytes and packets destined to the router.

extensive

Transit statistics

Number and rate of bytes and packets transiting the switch.

Note: For Gigabit Ethernet intelligent queuing 2 (IQ2) interfaces, the logical interface egress statistics might not accurately reflect the traffic on the wire when output shaping is applied. Traffic management output shaping might drop packets after they are tallied by the Output bytes and Output packets interface counters. However, correct values display for both of these egress statistics when per-unit scheduling is enabled for the Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 physical interface, or when a single logical interface is actively using a shared scheduler.

extensive

Generation

Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.

detail extensive

Route Table

Route table in which the logical interface address is located. For example, 0 refers to the routing table inet.0.

detail extensive none

Flags

Information about protocol family flags. Possible values are described in the “Family Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.

detail extensive

Donor interface

(Unnumbered Ethernet) Interface from which an unnumbered Ethernet interface borrows an IPv4 address.

detail extensive none

Preferred source address

(Unnumbered Ethernet) Secondary IPv4 address of the donor loopback interface that acts as the preferred source address for the unnumbered Ethernet interface.

detail extensive none

Input Filters

Names of any input filters applied to this interface. If you specify a precedence value for any filter in a dynamic profile, filter precedence values appear in parentheses next to all interfaces.

detail extensive

Output Filters

Names of any output filters applied to this interface. If you specify a precedence value for any filter in a dynamic profile, filter precedence values appear in parentheses next to all interfaces.

detail extensive

Mac-Validate Failures

Number of MAC address validation failures for packets and bytes. This field is displayed when MAC address validation is enabled for the logical interface.

detail extensive none

Addresses, Flags

Information about the address flags. Possible values are described in the “Addresses Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.

detail extensive none

protocol-family

Protocol family configured on the logical interface. If the protocol is inet, the IP address of the interface is also displayed.

brief

Flags

Information about the address flag. Possible values are described in the “Addresses Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.

detail extensive none

Destination

IP address of the remote side of the connection.

detail extensive none

Local

IP address of the logical interface.

detail extensive none

Broadcast

Broadcast address of the logical interface.

detail extensive none

Generation

Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.

detail extensive

The following table describes the output fields for the show interfaces (10–Gigabit Ethernet) command.

Field NameField DescriptionLevel of Output

Physical interface

Name of the physical interface.

All levels

Enabled

State of the interface. Possible values are described in the “Enabled Field” section under Common Output Fields Description.

All levels

Interface index

Index number of the physical interface, which reflects its initialization sequence.

detail extensive none

SNMP ifIndex

SNMP index number for the physical interface.

detail extensive none

Generation

Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.

detail extensive

Link-level type

Encapsulation being used on the physical interface.

All levels

MTU

Maximum transmission unit size on the physical interface.

All levels

Speed

Speed at which the interface is running.

All levels

Loopback

Loopback status: Enabled or Disabled. If loopback is enabled, type of loopback: Local or Remote.

All levels

Source filtering

Source filtering status: Enabled or Disabled.

All levels

LAN-PHY mode

10-Gigabit Ethernet interface operating in Local Area Network Physical Layer Device (LAN PHY) mode. LAN PHY allows 10-Gigabit Ethernet wide area links to use existing Ethernet applications.

All levels

WAN-PHY mode

10-Gigabit Ethernet interface operating in Wide Area Network Physical Layer Device (WAN PHY) mode. WAN PHY allows 10-Gigabit Ethernet wide area links to use fiber-optic cables and other devices intended for SONET/SDH.

All levels

Unidirectional

Unidirectional link mode status for 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface: Enabled or Disabled for parent interface; Rx-only or Tx-only for child interfaces.

All levels

Flow control

Flow control status: Enabled or Disabled.

All levels

Auto-negotiation

(Gigabit Ethernet interfaces) Autonegotiation status: Enabled or Disabled.

All levels

Remote-fault

(Gigabit Ethernet interfaces) Remote fault status:

  • Online—Autonegotiation is manually configured as online.

  • Offline—Autonegotiation is manually configured as offline.

All levels

Device flags

Information about the physical device. Possible values are described in the “Device Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.

All levels

Interface flags

Information about the interface. Possible values are described in the “Interface Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.

All levels

Link flags

Information about the link. Possible values are described in the “Links Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.

All levels

Wavelength

(10-Gigabit Ethernet dense wavelength-division multiplexing [DWDM] interfaces) Displays the configured wavelength, in nanometers (nm).

All levels

Frequency

(10-Gigabit Ethernet DWDM interfaces only) Displays the frequency associated with the configured wavelength, in terahertz (THz).

All levels

CoS queues

Number of CoS queues configured.

detail extensive none

Schedulers

(Gigabit Ethernet intelligent queuing 2 (IQ2) interfaces only) Number of CoS schedulers configured.

extensive

Hold-times

Current interface hold-time up and hold-time down, in milliseconds.

detail extensive

Current address

Configured MAC address.

detail extensive none

Hardware address

Hardware MAC address.

detail extensive none

Last flapped

Date, time, and how long ago the interface went from down to up. The format is Last flapped: year-month-day hour:minute:second:timezone (hour:minute:second ago). For example, Last flapped: 2002-04-26 10:52:40 PDT (04:33:20 ago).

detail extensive none

Input Rate

Input rate in bits per second (bps) and packets per second (pps). The value in this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for ingress traffic on Ethernet interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the logical interface level.

None specified

Output Rate

Output rate in bps and pps. The value in this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for egress traffic on Ethernet interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the logical interface level.

None specified

Statistics last cleared

Time when the statistics for the interface were last set to zero.

detail extensive

Egress account overhead

Layer 2 overhead in bytes that is accounted in the interface statistics for egress traffic.

detail extensive

Ingress account overhead

Layer 2 overhead in bytes that is accounted in the interface statistics for ingress traffic.

detail extensive

Traffic statistics

Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the physical interface.

  • Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface. The value in this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for ingress traffic on Ethernet interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the logical interface level.

  • Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface. The value in this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for egress traffic on Ethernet interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the logical interface level.

  • Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface.

  • Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.

detail extensive

Input errors

Input errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters whose meaning might not be obvious:

  • Errors—Sum of the incoming frame aborts and FCS errors.

  • Drops—Number of packets dropped by the input queue of the I/O Manager ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.

  • Framing errors—Number of packets received with an invalid frame checksum (FCS).

  • Runts—Number of frames received that are smaller than the runt threshold.

  • Policed discards—Number of frames that the incoming packet match code discarded because they were not recognized or not of interest. Usually, this field reports protocols that the Junos OS does not handle.

  • L3 incompletes—Number of incoming packets discarded because they failed Layer 3 (usually IPv4) sanity checks of the header. For example, a frame with less than 20 bytes of available IP header is discarded. L3 incomplete errors can be ignored by configuring the ignore-l3-incompletes statement.

  • L2 channel errors—Number of times the software did not find a valid logical interface for an incoming frame.

  • L2 mismatch timeouts—Number of malformed or short packets that caused the incoming packet handler to discard the frame as unreadable.

  • FIFO errors—Number of FIFO errors in the receive direction that are reported by the ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably malfunctioning.

  • Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.

extensive

Output errors

Output errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters whose meaning might not be obvious:

  • Carrier transitions—Number of times the interface has gone from down to up. This number does not normally increment quickly, increasing only when the cable is unplugged, the far-end system is powered down and then up, or another problem occurs. If the number of carrier transitions increments quickly (perhaps once every 10 seconds), the cable, the far-end system, or the PIC or PIM is malfunctioning.

  • Errors—Sum of the outgoing frame aborts and FCS errors.

  • Drops—Number of packets dropped by the output queue of the I/O Manager ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.

  • Collisions—Number of Ethernet collisions. The Gigabit Ethernet PIC supports only full-duplex operation, so for Gigabit Ethernet PICs, this number should always remain 0. If it is nonzero, there is a software bug.

  • Aged packets—Number of packets that remained in shared packet SDRAM so long that the system automatically purged them. The value in this field should never increment. If it does, it is most likely a software bug or possibly malfunctioning hardware.

  • FIFO errors—Number of FIFO errors in the send direction as reported by the ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably malfunctioning.

  • HS link CRC errors—Number of errors on the high-speed links between the ASICs responsible for handling the router interfaces.

  • MTU errors—Number of packets whose size exceeded the MTU of the interface.

  • Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.

extensive

Egress queues

Total number of egress queues supported on the specified interface.

Note: In DPCs that are not of the enhanced type, such as DPC 40x 1GE R, DPCE 20x 1GE + 2x 10GE R, or DPCE 40x 1GE R, you might notice a discrepancy in the output of the show interfaces command because incoming packets might be counted in the Egress queues section of the output. This problem occurs on non-enhanced DPCs because the egress queue statistics are polled from IMQ (Inbound Message Queuing) block of the I-chip. The IMQ block does not differentiate between ingress and egress WAN traffic; as a result, the combined statistics are displayed in the egress queue counters on the Routing Engine. In a simple VPLS scenorio, if there is no MAC entry in DMAC table (by sending unidirectional traffic), traffic is flooded and the input traffic is accounted in IMQ. For bidirectional traffic (MAC entry in DMAC table), if the outgoing interface is on the same I-chip then both ingress and egress statistics are counted in a combined way. If the outgoing interface is on a different I-chip or FPC, then only egress statistics are accounted in IMQ. This behavior is expected with non-enhanced DPCs

detail extensive

Queue counters (Egress)

CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name.

  • Queued packets—Number of queued packets.

  • Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.

  • Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.

detail extensive

Ingress queues

Total number of ingress queues supported on the specified interface. Displayed on IQ2 interfaces.

extensive

Queue counters (Ingress)

CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name. Displayed on IQ2 interfaces.

  • Queued packets—Number of queued packets.

  • Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.

  • Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.

extensive

Active alarms and Active defects

Ethernet-specific defects that can prevent the interface from passing packets. When a defect persists for a certain amount of time, it is promoted to an alarm. Based on the routing device configuration, an alarm can ring the red or yellow alarm bell on the routing device, or turn on the red or yellow alarm LED on the craft interface. These fields can contain the value None or Link.

  • None—There are no active defects or alarms.

  • Link—Interface has lost its link state, which usually means that the cable is unplugged, the far-end system has been turned off, or the PIC is malfunctioning.

detail extensive none

OTN alarms

Active OTN alarms identified on the interface.

detail extensive

OTN defects

OTN defects received on the interface.

detail extensive

OTN FEC Mode

The FECmode configured on the interface.

  • efec—Enhanced forward error correction (EFEC) is configured to defect and correct bit errors.

  • gfec—G.709 Forward error correction (GFEC) mode is configured to detect and correct bit errors.

  • none—FEC mode is not configured.

detail extensive

OTN Rate

OTN mode.

  • fixed-stuff-bytes—Fixed stuff bytes 11.0957 Gbps.

  • no-fixed-stuff-bytes—No fixed stuff bytes 11.0491 Gbps.

  • pass-through—Enable OTN passthrough mode.

  • no-pass-through—Do not enable OTN passthrough mode.

detail extensive

OTN Line Loopback

Status of the line loopback, if configured for the DWDM OTN PIC. Its value can be: enabled or disabled.

detail extensive

OTN FEC statistics

The forward error correction (FEC) counters for the DWDM OTN PIC.

  • Corrected Errors—The count of corrected errors in the last second.

  • Corrected Error Ratio—The corrected error ratio in the last 25 seconds. For example, 1e-7 is 1 error per 10 million bits.

detail extensive

OTN FEC alarms

OTN FEC excessive or degraded error alarms triggered on the interface.

  • FEC Degrade—OTU FEC Degrade defect.

  • FEC Excessive—OTU FEC Excessive Error defect.

detail extensive

OTN OC

OTN OC defects triggered on the interface.

  • LOS—OC Loss of Signal defect.

  • LOF—OC Loss of Frame defect.

  • LOM—OC Loss of Multiframe defect.

  • Wavelength Lock—OC Wavelength Lock defect.

detail extensive

OTN OTU

OTN OTU defects detected on the interface

  • AIS—OTN AIS alarm.

  • BDI—OTN OTU BDI alarm.

  • IAE—OTN OTU IAE alarm.

  • TTIM—OTN OTU TTIM alarm.

  • SF—OTN ODU bit error rate fault alarm.

  • SD—OTN ODU bit error rate defect alarm.

  • TCA-ES—OTN ODU ES threshold alarm.

  • TCA-SES—OTN ODU SES threshold alarm.

  • TCA-UAS—OTN ODU UAS threshold alarm.

  • TCA-BBE—OTN ODU BBE threshold alarm.

  • BIP—OTN ODU BIP threshold alarm.

  • BBE—OTN OTU BBE threshold alarm.

  • ES—OTN OTU ES threshold alarm.

  • SES—OTN OTU SES threshold alarm.

  • UAS—OTN OTU UAS threshold alarm.

detail extensive

Received DAPI

Destination Access Port Interface (DAPI) from which the packets were received.

detail extensive

Received SAPI

Source Access Port Interface (SAPI) from which the packets were received.

detail extensive

Transmitted DAPI

Destination Access Port Interface (DAPI) to which the packets were transmitted.

detail extensive

Transmitted SAPI

Source Access Port Interface (SAPI) to which the packets were transmitted.

detail extensive

PCS statistics

(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces) Displays Physical Coding Sublayer (PCS) fault conditions from the WAN PHY or the LAN PHY device.

  • Bit errors—The number of seconds during which at least one bit error rate (BER) occurred while the PCS receiver is operating in normal mode.

  • Errored blocks—The number of seconds when at least one errored block occurred while the PCS receiver is operating in normal mode.

detail extensive

MAC statistics

Receive and Transmit statistics reported by the PIC's MAC subsystem, including the following:

  • Total octets and total packets—Total number of octets and packets. For Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs, the received octets count varies by interface type.

  • Unicast packets, Broadcast packets, and Multicast packets—Number of unicast, broadcast, and multicast packets.

  • CRC/Align errors—Total number of packets received that had a length (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets) of between 64 and 1518 octets, inclusive, and had either a bad FCS with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error).

  • FIFO error—Number of FIFO errors that are reported by the ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC or a cable is probably malfunctioning.

  • MAC control frames—Number of MAC control frames.

  • MAC pause frames—Number of MAC control frames with pause operational code.

  • Oversized frames—Number of frames that exceed 1518 octets.

  • Jabber frames—Number of frames that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets), and had either an FCS error or an alignment error. This definition of jabber is different from the definition in IEEE-802.3 section 8.2.1.5 (10BASE5) and section 10.3.1.4 (10BASE2). These documents define jabber as the condition in which any packet exceeds 20 ms. The allowed range to detect jabber is from 20 ms to 150 ms.

  • Fragment frames—Total number of packets that were less than 64 octets in length (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets), and had either an FCS error or an alignment error. Fragment frames normally increment because both runts (which are normal occurrences caused by collisions) and noise hits are counted.

  • VLAN tagged frames—Number of frames that are VLAN tagged. The system uses the TPID of 0x8100 in the frame to determine whether a frame is tagged or not.

  • Code violations—Number of times an event caused the PHY to indicate “Data reception error” or “invalid data symbol error.”

extensive

OTN Received Overhead Bytes

APS/PCC0: 0x02, APS/PCC1: 0x11, APS/PCC2: 0x47, APS/PCC3: 0x58 Payload Type: 0x08

extensive

OTN Transmitted Overhead Bytes

APS/PCC0: 0x00, APS/PCC1: 0x00, APS/PCC2: 0x00, APS/PCC3: 0x00 Payload Type: 0x08

extensive

Filter statistics

Receive and Transmit statistics reported by the PIC's MAC address filter subsystem. The filtering is done by the content-addressable memory (CAM) on the PIC. The filter examines a packet's source and destination MAC addresses to determine whether the packet should enter the system or be rejected.

  • Input packet count—Number of packets received from the MAC hardware that the filter processed.

  • Input packet rejects—Number of packets that the filter rejected because of either the source MAC address or the destination MAC address.

  • Input DA rejects—Number of packets that the filter rejected because the destination MAC address of the packet is not on the accept list. It is normal for this value to increment. When it increments very quickly and no traffic is entering the routing device from the far-end system, either there is a bad ARP entry on the far-end system, or multicast routing is not on and the far-end system is sending many multicast packets to the local routing device (which the routing device is rejecting).

  • Input SA rejects—Number of packets that the filter rejected because the source MAC address of the packet is not on the accept list. The value in this field should increment only if source MAC address filtering has been enabled. If filtering is enabled, if the value increments quickly, and if the system is not receiving traffic that it should from the far-end system, it means that the user-configured source MAC addresses for this interface are incorrect.

  • Output packet count—Number of packets that the filter has given to the MAC hardware.

  • Output packet pad count—Number of packets the filter padded to the minimum Ethernet size (60 bytes) before giving the packet to the MAC hardware. Usually, padding is done only on small ARP packets, but some very small IP packets can also require padding. If this value increments rapidly, either the system is trying to find an ARP entry for a far-end system that does not exist or it is misconfigured.

  • Output packet error count—Number of packets with an indicated error that the filter was given to transmit. These packets are usually aged packets or are the result of a bandwidth problem on the FPC hardware. On a normal system, the value of this field should not increment.

  • CAM destination filters, CAM source filters—Number of entries in the CAM dedicated to destination and source MAC address filters. There can only be up to 64 source entries. If source filtering is disabled, which is the default, the values for these fields should be 0.

extensive

PMA PHY

(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) SONET error information:

  • Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.

  • Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.

  • State—State of the error. Any state other than OK indicates a problem.

extensive

WIS section

(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) SONET error information:

  • Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.

  • Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.

  • State—State of the error. Any state other than OK indicates a problem.

Subfields are:

  • BIP-B1—Bit interleaved parity for SONET section overhead

  • SEF—Severely errored framing

  • LOL—Loss of light

  • LOF—Loss of frame

  • ES-S—Errored seconds (section)

  • SES-S—Severely errored seconds (section)

  • SEFS-S—Severely errored framing seconds (section)

extensive

WIS line

(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) Active alarms and defects, plus counts of specific SONET errors with detailed information.

  • Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.

  • Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.

  • State—State of the error. State other than OK indicates a problem.

Subfields are:

  • BIP-B2—Bit interleaved parity for SONET line overhead

  • REI-L—Remote error indication (near-end line)

  • RDI-L—Remote defect indication (near-end line)

  • AIS-L—Alarm indication signal (near-end line)

  • BERR-SF—Bit error rate fault (signal failure)

  • BERR-SD—Bit error rate defect (signal degradation)

  • ES-L—Errored seconds (near-end line)

  • SES-L—Severely errored seconds (near-end line)

  • UAS-L—Unavailable seconds (near-end line)

  • ES-LFE—Errored seconds (far-end line)

  • SES-LFE—Severely errored seconds (far-end line)

  • UAS-LFE—Unavailable seconds (far-end line)

extensive

WIS path

(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) Active alarms and defects, plus counts of specific SONET errors with detailed information.

  • Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.

  • Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.

  • State—State of the error. Any state other than OK indicates a problem.

Subfields are:

  • BIP-B3—Bit interleaved parity for SONET section overhead

  • REI-P—Remote error indication

  • LOP-P—Loss of pointer (path)

  • AIS-P—Path alarm indication signal

  • RDI-P—Path remote defect indication

  • UNEQ-P—Path unequipped

  • PLM-P—Path payload label mismatch

  • ES-P—Errored seconds (near-end STS path)

  • SES-P—Severely errored seconds (near-end STS path)

  • UAS-P—Unavailable seconds (near-end STS path)

  • SES-PFE—Severely errored seconds (far-end STS path)

  • UAS-PFE—Unavailable seconds (far-end STS path)

extensive

Autonegotiation information

Information about link autonegotiation.

  • Negotiation status:

    • Incomplete—Ethernet interface has the speed or link mode configured.

    • No autonegotiation—Remote Ethernet interface has the speed or link mode configured, or does not perform autonegotiation.

    • Complete—Ethernet interface is connected to a device that performs autonegotiation and the autonegotiation process is successful.

  • Link partner statusOK when Ethernet interface is connected to a device that performs autonegotiation and the autonegotiation process is successful.

  • Link partner:

    • Link mode—Depending on the capability of the attached Ethernet device, either Full-duplex or Half-duplex.

    • Flow control—Types of flow control supported by the remote Ethernet device. For Fast Ethernet interfaces, the type is None. For Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, types are Symmetric (link partner supports PAUSE on receive and transmit), Asymmetric (link partner supports PAUSE on transmit), and Symmetric/Asymmetric (link partner supports both PAUSE on receive and transmit or only PAUSE receive).

    • Remote fault—Remote fault information from the link partner—Failure indicates a receive link error. OK indicates that the link partner is receiving. Negotiation error indicates a negotiation error. Offline indicates that the link partner is going offline.

  • Local resolution—Information from the link partner:

    • Flow control—Types of flow control supported by the remote Ethernet device. For Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, types are Symmetric (link partner supports PAUSE on receive and transmit), Asymmetric (link partner supports PAUSE on transmit), and Symmetric/Asymmetric (link partner supports both PAUSE on receive and transmit or only PAUSE receive).

    • Remote fault—Remote fault information. Link OK (no error detected on receive), Offline (local interface is offline), and Link Failure (link error detected on receive).

extensive

Received path trace, Transmitted path trace

(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) SONET/SDH interfaces allow path trace bytes to be sent inband across the SONET/SDH link. Juniper Networks and other router manufacturers use these bytes to help diagnose misconfigurations and network errors by setting the transmitted path trace message so that it contains the system hostname and name of the physical interface. The received path trace value is the message received from the routing device at the other end of the fiber. The transmitted path trace value is the message that this routing device transmits.

extensive

Packet Forwarding Engine configuration

Information about the configuration of the Packet Forwarding Engine:

  • Destination slot—FPC slot number.

extensive

CoS information

Information about the CoS queue for the physical interface.

  • CoS transmit queue—Queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name.

  • Bandwidth %—Percentage of bandwidth allocated to the queue.

  • Bandwidth bps—Bandwidth allocated to the queue (in bps).

  • Buffer %—Percentage of buffer space allocated to the queue.

  • Buffer usec—Amount of buffer space allocated to the queue, in microseconds. This value is nonzero only if the buffer size is configured in terms of time.

  • Priority—Queue priority: low or high.

  • Limit—Displayed if rate limiting is configured for the queue. Possible values are none and exact. If exact is configured, the queue transmits only up to the configured bandwidth, even if excess bandwidth is available. If none is configured, the queue transmits beyond the configured bandwidth if bandwidth is available.

extensive

Logical Interface

Logical interface

Name of the logical interface.

All levels

Index

Index number of the logical interface, which reflects its initialization sequence.

detail extensive none

SNMP ifIndex

SNMP interface index number for the logical interface.

detail extensive none

Generation

Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.

detail extensive

Flags

Information about the logical interface. Possible values are described in the “Logical Interface Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.

All levels

VLAN-Tag

Rewrite profile applied to incoming or outgoing frames on the outer (Out) VLAN tag or for both the outer and inner (In) VLAN tags.

  • push—An outer VLAN tag is pushed in front of the existing VLAN tag.

  • pop—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is removed.

  • swap—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is overwritten with the user specified VLAN tag information.

  • push—An outer VLAN tag is pushed in front of the existing VLAN tag.

  • push-push—Two VLAN tags are pushed in from the incoming frame.

  • swap-push—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is replaced by a user-specified VLAN tag value. A user-specified outer VLAN tag is pushed in front. The outer tag becomes an inner tag in the final frame.

  • swap-swap—Both the inner and the outer VLAN tags of the incoming frame are replaced by the user specified VLAN tag value.

  • pop-swap—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is removed, and the inner VLAN tag of the incoming frame is replaced by the user-specified VLAN tag value. The inner tag becomes the outer tag in the final frame.

  • pop-pop—Both the outer and inner VLAN tags of the incoming frame are removed.

brief detail extensive none

Demux:

IP demultiplexing (demux) value that appears if this interface is used as the demux underlying interface. The output is one of the following:

  • Source Family Inet

  • Destination Family Inet

detail extensive none

Encapsulation

Encapsulation on the logical interface.

All levels

Protocol

Protocol family. Possible values are described in the “Protocol Field” section under Common Output Fields Description.

detail extensive none

MTU

Maximum transmission unit size on the logical interface.

detail extensive none

Maximum labels

Maximum number of MPLS labels configured for the MPLS protocol family on the logical interface.

detail extensive none

Traffic statistics

Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the specified interface set.

  • Input bytes, Output bytes—Number of bytes received and transmitted on the interface set. The value in this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for ingress or egress traffic on Ethernet interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the logical interface level.

  • Input packets, Output packets—Number of packets received and transmitted on the interface set.

detail extensive

IPv6 transit statistics

Number of IPv6 transit bytes and packets received and transmitted on the logical interface if IPv6 statistics tracking is enabled.

extensive

Local statistics

Number and rate of bytes and packets destined to the routing device.

extensive

Transit statistics

Number and rate of bytes and packets transiting the switch.

Note: For Gigabit Ethernet intelligent queuing 2 (IQ2) interfaces, the logical interface egress statistics might not accurately reflect the traffic on the wire when output shaping is applied. Traffic management output shaping might drop packets after they are tallied by the Output bytes and Output packets interface counters. However, correct values display for both of these egress statistics when per-unit scheduling is enabled for the Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 physical interface, or when a single logical interface is actively using a shared scheduler.

extensive

Generation

Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.

detail extensive

Route Table

Route table in which the logical interface address is located. For example, 0 refers to the routing table inet.0.

detail extensive none

Flags

Information about protocol family flags. Possible values are described in the “Family Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.

detail extensive

Donor interface

(Unnumbered Ethernet) Interface from which an unnumbered Ethernet interface borrows an IPv4 address.

detail extensive none

Preferred source address

(Unnumbered Ethernet) Secondary IPv4 address of the donor loopback interface that acts as the preferred source address for the unnumbered Ethernet interface.

detail extensive none

Input Filters

Names of any input filters applied to this interface. If you specify a precedence value for any filter in a dynamic profile, filter precedence values appear in parenthesis next to all interfaces.

detail extensive

Output Filters

Names of any output filters applied to this interface. If you specify a precedence value for any filter in a dynamic profile, filter precedence values appear in parenthesis next to all interfaces.

detail extensive

Mac-Validate Failures

Number of MAC address validation failures for packets and bytes. This field is displayed when MAC address validation is enabled for the logical interface.

detail extensive none

Addresses, Flags

Information about the address flags. Possible values are described in the “Addresses Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.

detail extensive none

protocol-family

Protocol family configured on the logical interface. If the protocol is inet, the IP address of the interface is also displayed.

brief

Flags

Information about address flag (possible values are described in the “Addresses Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.

detail extensive none

Destination

IP address of the remote side of the connection.

detail extensive none

Local

IP address of the logical interface.

detail extensive none

Broadcast

Broadcast address of the logical interlace.

detail extensive none

Generation

Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.

detail extensive

For Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs, traffic and MAC statistics output varies. The following table describes the traffic and MAC statistics for two sample interfaces, each of which is sending traffic in packets of 500 bytes (including 478 bytes for the Layer 3 packet, 18 bytes for the Layer 2 VLAN traffic header, and 4 bytes for cyclic redundancy check [CRC] information). The ge-0/3/0 interface is the inbound physical interface, and the ge-0/0/0 interface is the outbound physical interface. On both interfaces, traffic is carried on logical unit .50 (VLAN 50).

Table 2: Gigabit and 10 Gigabit Ethernet IQ PIC Traffic and MAC Statistics by Interface Type

Interface Type

Sample Command

Byte and Octet Counts Include

Comments

Inbound physical interface

show interfaces ge-0/3/0 extensive

Traffic statistics:

Input bytes: 496 bytes per packet, representing the Layer 2 packet

MAC statistics:

Received octets: 500 bytes per packet, representing the Layer 2 packet + 4 bytes

The additional 4 bytes are for the CRC.

Inbound logical interface

show interfaces ge-0/3/0.50 extensive

Traffic statistics:

Input bytes: 478 bytes per packet, representing the Layer 3 packet

 

Outbound physical interface

show interfaces ge-0/0/0 extensive

Traffic statistics:

Input bytes: 490 bytes per packet, representing the Layer 3 packet + 12 bytes

MAC statistics:

Received octets: 478 bytes per packet, representing the Layer 3 packet

For input bytes, the additional 12 bytes include 6 bytes for the destination MAC address plus 4 bytes for VLAN plus 2 bytes for the Ethernet type.

Outbound logical interface

show interfaces ge-0/0/0.50 extensive

Traffic statistics:

Input bytes: 478 bytes per packet, representing the Layer 3 packet

 

Table 3 lists the output fields for the show interfaces command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.

Table 3: show interfaces Output Fields

Field Name

Field Description

Level of Output

Physical Interface 

Physical interface

Name of the physical interface.

All levels

Enabled

State of the interface.

All levels

Interface index

Index number of the physical interface, which reflects its initialization sequence.

detail extensive none

SNMP ifIndex

SNMP index number for the physical interface.

detail extensive none

Link-level type

Encapsulation being used on the physical interface.

All levels

Generation

Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.

detail extensive

MTU

Maximum transmission unit size on the physical interface.

All levels

Link mode

Link mode: Full-duplex or Half-duplex.

Speed

Speed at which the interface is running.

All levels

BPDU error

Bridge protocol data unit (BPDU) error: Detected or None

Loopback

Loopback status: Enabled or Disabled. If loopback is enabled, type of loopback: Local or Remote.

All levels

Source filtering

Source filtering status: Enabled or Disabled.

All levels

Flow control

Flow control status: Enabled or Disabled.

All levels

Auto-negotiation

(Gigabit Ethernet interfaces) Autonegotiation status: Enabled or Disabled.

All levels

Remote-fault

(Gigabit Ethernet interfaces) Remote fault status:

  • Online—Autonegotiation is manually configured as online.

  • Offline—Autonegotiation is manually configured as offline.

All levels

Device flags

Information about the physical device.

All levels

Interface flags

Information about the interface.

All levels

Link flags

Information about the physical link.

All levels

CoS queues

Number of CoS queues configured.

detail extensive none

Current address

Configured MAC address.

detail extensive none

Last flapped

Date, time, and how long ago the interface went from down to up. The format is Last flapped: year-month-day hour:minute:second:timezone (hour:minute:second ago). For example, Last flapped: 2002-04-26 10:52:40 PDT (04:33:20 ago).

detail extensive none

Input Rate

Input rate in bits per second (bps) and packets per second (pps).

None

Output Rate

Output rate in bps and pps.

None

Active alarms and Active defects

Ethernet-specific defects that can prevent the interface from passing packets. When a defect persists for a certain amount of time, it is promoted to an alarm. These fields can contain the value None or Link.

  • None—There are no active defects or alarms.

  • Link—Interface has lost its link state, which usually means that the cable is unplugged, the far-end system has been turned off, or the PIC is malfunctioning.

detail extensive none

Statistics last cleared

Time when the statistics for the interface were last set to zero.

detail extensive

Traffic statistics

Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the physical interface.

  • Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface.

  • Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface.

  • Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface.

  • Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.

detail extensive

Input errors

Input errors on the interface.

  • Errors—Sum of the incoming frame aborts and FCS errors.

  • Drops—Number of packets dropped by the input queue of the I/O Manager ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.

  • Framing errors—Number of packets received with an invalid frame checksum (FCS).

  • Runts—Number of frames received that are smaller than the runt threshold.

  • Policed discards—Number of frames that the incoming packet match code discarded because they were not recognized or not of interest. Usually, this field reports protocols that Junos OS does not handle.

  • L3 incompletes—Number of incoming packets discarded because they failed Layer 3 (usually IPv4) sanity checks of the header. For example, a frame with less than 20 bytes of available IP header is discarded. L3 incomplete errors can be ignored by configuring the ignore-l3-incompletes .

  • L2 channel errors—Number of times the software did not find a valid logical interface for an incoming frame.

  • L2 mismatch timeouts—Number of malformed or short packets that caused the incoming packet handler to discard the frame as unreadable.

  • FIFO errors—Number of FIFO errors in the receive direction that are reported by the ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably malfunctioning.

  • Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.

extensive

Output errors

Output errors on the interface.

  • Carrier transitions—Number of times the interface has gone from down to up. This number does not normally increment quickly, increasing only when the cable is unplugged, the far-end system is powered down and then up, or another problem occurs. If the number of carrier transitions increments quickly (perhaps once every 10 seconds), the cable, the far-end system, or the PIC or PIM is malfunctioning.

  • Errors—Sum of the outgoing frame aborts and FCS errors.

  • Drops—Number of packets dropped by the output queue of the I/O Manager ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.

  • Collisions—Number of Ethernet collisions. The Gigabit Ethernet PIC supports only full-duplex operation; therefore, for Gigabit Ethernet PICs, this number must always remain 0. If it is nonzero, there is a software bug.

  • Aged packets—Number of packets that remained in shared packet SDRAM so long that the system automatically purged them. The value in this field must never increment. If it does, it is most likely a software bug or possibly malfunctioning hardware.

  • FIFO errors—Number of FIFO errors in the send direction as reported by the ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably malfunctioning.

  • HS link CRC errors—Number of errors on the high-speed links between the ASICs responsible for handling the interfaces.

  • MTU errors—Number of packets whose size exceeded the MTU of the interface.

  • Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.

extensive

Ingress queues

Total number of ingress queues supported on the specified interface.

extensive

Queue counters and queue number

CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name.

  • Queued packets—Number of queued packets.

  • Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.

  • Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.

detail extensive

MAC statistics

Receive and Transmit statistics reported by the PIC's MAC subsystem, including the following:

  • Total octets and total packets—Total number of octets and packets.

  • Unicast packets, Broadcast packets, and Multicast packets—Number of unicast, broadcast, and multicast packets.

  • CRC/Align errors—Total number of packets received that had a length (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets) of between 64 and 1518 octets, inclusive, and had either a bad FCS with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error).

  • FIFO error—Number of FIFO errors that are reported by the ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC or a cable is probably malfunctioning.

  • MAC control frames—Number of MAC control frames.

  • MAC pause frames—Number of MAC control frames with pause operational code.

  • Oversized frames—There are two possible conditions regarding the number of oversized frames:

    • Packet length exceeds 1518 octets, or

    • Packet length exceeds MRU

  • Jabber frames—Number of frames that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets), and had either an FCS error or an alignment error. This definition of jabber is different from the definition in IEEE-802.3 section 8.2.1.5 (10BASE5) and section 10.3.1.4 (10BASE2). These documents define jabber as the condition in which any packet exceeds 20 ms. The allowed range to detect jabber is from 20 ms to 150 ms.

  • Fragment frames—Total number of packets that were less than 64 octets in length (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets) and had either an FCS error or an alignment error. Fragment frames normally increment because both runts (which are normal occurrences caused by collisions) and noise hits are counted.

  • VLAN tagged frames—Number of frames that are VLAN tagged. The system uses the TPID of 0x8100 in the frame to determine whether a frame is tagged or not.

  • Code violations—Number of times an event caused the PHY to indicate “Data reception error” or “invalid data symbol error.”

extensive

Filter statistics

Receive and Transmit statistics reported by the PIC's MAC address filter subsystem. The filtering is done by the content-addressable memory (CAM) on the PIC. The filter examines a packet's source and destination MAC addresses to determine whether the packet should enter the system or be rejected.

  • Input packet count—Number of packets received from the MAC hardware that the filter processed.

  • Input packet rejects—Number of packets that the filter rejected because of either the source MAC address or the destination MAC address.

  • Input DA rejects—Number of packets that the filter rejected because the destination MAC address of the packet is not on the accept list. It is normal for this value to increment. When it increments very quickly and no traffic is entering the device from the far-end system, either there is a bad ARP entry on the far-end system, or multicast routing is not on and the far-end system is sending many multicast packets to the local device (which the router is rejecting).

  • Input SA rejects—Number of packets that the filter rejected because the source MAC address of the packet is not on the accept list. The value in this field should increment only if source MAC address filtering has been enabled. If filtering is enabled, if the value increments quickly, and if the system is not receiving traffic that it should from the far-end system, it means that the user-configured source MAC addresses for this interface are incorrect.

  • Output packet count—Number of packets that the filter has given to the MAC hardware.

  • Output packet pad count—Number of packets the filter padded to the minimum Ethernet size (60 bytes) before giving the packet to the MAC hardware. Usually, padding is done only on small ARP packets, but some very small IP packets can also require padding. If this value increments rapidly, either the system is trying to find an ARP entry for a far-end system that does not exist or it is misconfigured.

  • Output packet error count—Number of packets with an indicated error that the filter was given to transmit. These packets are usually aged packets or are the result of a bandwidth problem on the FPC hardware. On a normal system, the value of this field should not increment.

  • CAM destination filters, CAM source filters—Number of entries in the CAM dedicated to destination and source MAC address filters. There can only be up to 64 source entries. If source filtering is disabled, which is the default, the values for these fields must be 0.

extensive

Autonegotiation information

Information about link autonegotiation.

  • Negotiation status:

    • Incomplete—Ethernet interface has the speed or link mode configured.

    • No autonegotiation—Remote Ethernet interface has the speed or link mode configured, or does not perform autonegotiation.

    • Complete—Ethernet interface is connected to a device that performs autonegotiation and the autonegotiation process is successful.

extensive

Packet Forwarding Engine configuration

Information about the configuration of the Packet Forwarding Engine:

  • Destination slot—FPC slot number.

extensive

CoS information

Information about the CoS queue for the physical interface.

  • CoS transmit queue—Queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name.

  • Bandwidth %—Percentage of bandwidth allocated to the queue.

  • Bandwidth bps—Bandwidth allocated to the queue (in bps).

  • Buffer %—Percentage of buffer space allocated to the queue.

  • Buffer usec—Amount of buffer space allocated to the queue, in microseconds. This value is nonzero only if the buffer size is configured in terms of time.

  • Priority—Queue priority: low or high.

  • Limit—Displayed if rate limiting is configured for the queue. Possible values are none and exact. If exact is configured, the queue transmits only up to the configured bandwidth, even if excess bandwidth is available. If none is configured, the queue transmits beyond the configured bandwidth if bandwidth is available.

extensive

Interface transmit statistics

Status of the interface-transmit-statistics configuration: Enabled or Disabled.

detail extensive

Queue counters (Egress)

CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name.

  • Queued packets—Number of queued packets.

  • Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.

  • Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.

detail extensive

Logical Interface  

Logical interface

Name of the logical interface.

All levels

Index

Index number of the logical interface, which reflects its initialization sequence.

detail extensive none

SNMP ifIndex

SNMP interface index number for the logical interface.

detail extensive none

Generation

Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.

detail extensive

Flags

Information about the logical interface.

All levels

Encapsulation

Encapsulation on the logical interface.

All levels

Traffic statistics

Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the specified interface set.

  • Input bytes, Output bytes—Number of bytes received and transmitted on the interface set. The value in this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for ingress or egress traffic on Ethernet interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the logical interface level.

  • Input packets, Output packets—Number of packets received and transmitted on the interface set.

detail extensive

Local statistics

Number and rate of bytes and packets destined to the device.

extensive

Transit statistics

Number and rate of bytes and packets transiting the switch.

Note: For Gigabit Ethernet intelligent queuing 2 (IQ2) interfaces, the logical interface egress statistics might not accurately reflect the traffic on the wire when output shaping is applied. Traffic management output shaping might drop packets after they are tallied by the Output bytes and Output packets interface counters. However, correct values display for both of these egress statistics when per-unit scheduling is enabled for the Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 physical interface, or when a single logical interface is actively using a shared scheduler.

extensive

Security

Security zones that interface belongs to.

extensive

Flow Input statistics

Statistics on packets received by flow module.

extensive

Flow Output statistics

Statistics on packets sent by flow module.

extensive

Flow error statistics (Packets dropped due to)

Statistics on errors in the flow module.

extensive

Protocol

Protocol family.

detail extensive none

MTU

Maximum transmission unit size on the logical interface.

detail extensive none

Generation

Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.

detail extensive

Route Table

Route table in which the logical interface address is located. For example, 0 refers to the routing table inet.0.

detail extensive none

Flags

Information about protocol family flags. .

detail extensive

Addresses, Flags

Information about the address flags..

detail extensive none

Destination

IP address of the remote side of the connection.

detail extensive none

Local

IP address of the logical interface.

detail extensive none

Broadcast

Broadcast address of the logical interface.

detail extensive none

Generation

Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.

detail extensive

Sample Output Gigabit Ethernet

show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet)

user@host> show interfaces ge-3/0/2

show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet on MX Series Routers)

user@host> show interfaces ge-2/2/2

show interfaces (link degrade status)

user@host> show interfaces et-3/0/0

show interfaces extensive (Gigabit Ethernet on MX Series Routers showing interface transmit statistics configuration)

user@host> show interfaces ge-2/1/2 extensive | match "output|interface"
user@host> show interfaces ge-5/2/0.0 statistics detail

show interfaces brief (Gigabit Ethernet)

user@host> show interfaces ge-3/0/2 brief

show interfaces detail (Gigabit Ethernet)

user@host> show interfaces ge-3/0/2 detail

show interfaces extensive (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2)

user@host> show interfaces ge-7/1/3 extensive

NOTE: For Gigabit Ethernet intelligent queuing 2 (IQ2) interfaces, the logical interface egress statistics displayed in the show interfaces command output might not accurately reflect the traffic on the wire when output shaping is applied. Traffic management output shaping might drop packets after they are tallied by the interface counters. For detailed information, see the description of the logical interface Transit statistics fields in Table 1.

show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet Unnumbered Interface)

user@host> show interfaces ge-3/2/0

show interfaces (ACI Interface Set Configured)

user@host> show interfaces ge-1/0/0.4001

show interfaces (ALI Interface Set)

user@host> show interfaces ge-1/0/0.10

Sample Output Gigabit Ethernet

show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, IQ2)

user@host> show interfaces xe-5/0/0 extensive

show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, WAN PHY Mode)

user@host> show interfaces xe-1/0/0 extensive

show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, DWDM OTN PIC)

user@host> show interfaces ge-7/0/0 extensive

show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, Unidirectional Mode)

user@host> show interfaces xe-7/0/0 extensive

show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, Unidirectional Mode, Transmit-Only)

user@host> show interfaces xe-7/0/0–tx extensive

show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, Unidirectional Mode, Receive-Only)

user@host> show interfaces xe-7/0/0–rx extensive

Sample Output

Sample Output SRX Gigabit Ethernet

user@host> show interfaces ge-0/0/1

Sample Output SRX Gigabit Ethernet

user@host> show interfaces ge-0/0/1

show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet for vSRX and vSRX 3.0)

user@host> show interfaces ge-0/0/0

show interfaces detail (Gigabit Ethernet)

user@host> show interfaces ge-0/0/1 detail

show interfaces statistics st0.0 detail

user@host> show interfaces statistics st0.0 detail

show interfaces extensive (Gigabit Ethernet)

user@host> show interfaces ge-0/0/1.0 extensive

show interfaces terse

user@host> show interfaces terse

show interfaces terse (vSRX and vSRX 3.0)

user@host> show interfaces terse

show interfaces controller (Channelized E1 IQ with Logical E1)

user@host> show interfaces controller ce1-1/2/6

show interfaces controller (Channelized E1 IQ with Logical DS0)

user@host> show interfaces controller ce1-1/2/3

show interfaces descriptions

user@host> show interfaces descriptions

show interfaces destination-class all

user@host> show interfaces destination-class all

show interfaces diagnostics optics

user@host> show interfaces diagnostics optics ge-2/0/0

show interfaces far-end-interval coc12-5/2/0

user@host> show interfaces far-end-interval coc12-5/2/0

show interfaces far-end-interval coc1-5/2/1:1

user@host> run show interfaces far-end-interval coc1-5/2/1:1

show interfaces filters

user@host> show interfaces filters

show interfaces flow-statistics (Gigabit Ethernet)

user@host> show interfaces flow-statistics ge-0/0/1.0

show interfaces interval (Channelized OC12)

user@host> show interfaces interval t3-0/3/0:0

show interfaces interval (E3)

user@host> show interfaces interval e3-0/3/0

show interfaces interval (SONET/SDH) (SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces interval so-0/1/0

show interfaces load-balancing (SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces load-balancing

show interfaces load-balancing detail (SRX devices)

user@host>show interfaces load-balancing detail

show interfaces mac-database (All MAC Addresses on a Port SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces mac-database xe-0/3/3

show interfaces mac-database (All MAC Addresses on a Service SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces mac-database xe-0/3/3

show interfaces mac-database mac-address

user@host> show interfaces mac-database xe-0/3/3 mac-address (SRX devices) 00:00:c8:01:01:09

show interfaces mc-ae (SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces mc-ae ae0 unit 512

show interfaces media (SONET/SDH)

The following example displays the output fields unique to the show interfaces media command for a SONET interface (with no level of output specified):

user@host> show interfaces media so-4/1/2

show interfaces policers (SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces policers

show interfaces policers interface-name (SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces policers so-2/1/0

show interfaces queue (SRX devices)

 

The following truncated example shows the CoS queue sizes for queues 0, 1, and 3. Queue 1 has a queue buffer size (guaranteed allocated memory) of 9192 bytes.

user@host> show interfaces queue

show interfaces redundancy (SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces redundancy

show interfaces redundancy (Aggregated Ethernet SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces redundancy

show interfaces redundancy detail (SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces redundancy detail

show interfaces routing brief (SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces routing brief

show interfaces routing detail (SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces routing detail

show interfaces routing-instance all (SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces terse routing-instance all

show interfaces snmp-index (SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces snmp-index 33

show interfaces source-class all (SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces source-class all

show interfaces statistics (Fast Ethernet SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces fe-1/3/1 statistics

show interfaces switch-port (SRX devices)

user@host# show interfaces ge-slot/0/0 switch-port port-number

show interfaces transport pm (SRX devices)

user@host> show interfaces transport pm all current et-0/1/0

show security zones (SRX devices)

user@host> show security zones
Release History Table
Release
Description
Starting in Junos OS Release 18.4R1, Output fields Next-hop and vpls-status is displayed in the show interfaces interface name detail command, only for Layer 2 protocols on MX480 routers.