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Example: Configuring VXLAN to VPLS Stitching with OVSDB

 

Virtual Extensible LAN (VXLAN) can be utilized with the Open vSwitch Database (OVSDB) management protocol in a VPLS-enabled network to stitch a virtualized data center into a Layer 2 VPN network. This configuration allows for seamless interconnection between different data centers using Layer 2 VPN regardless of whether it is virtualized, physical, or both.

Requirements

This example uses the following hardware and software components:

  • Two MX Series routers running Junos OS 14.1R2 or later

  • Two MX Series routers running Junos OS 14.1R2 or later with an OVSDB software package. The release of this package must be the same as the Junos OS release running on the device.

  • One EX9200 switch

  • One VMware NSX controller

  • NSX Manager

Before you start the configuration, you must perform the following tasks:

  • In NSX Manager or the NSX API, configure a logical switch for each VXLAN that OVSDB will manage. This example implements two OVSDB-managed VXLANs, so you must configure two logical switches. After the configuration of each logical switch, NSX automatically generates a universally unique identifier (UUID) for the logical switch. If you have not done so already, retrieve the UUID for each logical switch. A sample UUID is 28805c1d-0122-495d-85df-19abd647d772. When configuring the equivalent VXLANs on the Juniper Networks device, you must use the UUID of the logical switch as the bridge domain name.

    For more information about logical switches and VXLANs, see Understanding How to Manually Configure OVSDB-Managed VXLANs.

  • Create an SSL private key and certificate, and install them in the /var/db/certs directory of the Juniper Networks device. For more information, see Creating and Installing an SSL Key and Certificate on a Juniper Networks Device for Connection with SDN Controllers.

Overview

In this example, four MX Series routers are configured to function together for VXLAN to virtual private LAN service (VPLS) stitching. Each router performs a different role in the configuration. The following diagram shows the topology of these MX Series routers. MX1 is the core router that handles Layer 3 traffic and protocols. MX2 is the VXLAN gateway router that functions as a virtual tunnel endpoint (VTEP) and handles switching for Layer 2, VPLS, and VXLAN. The MX3 router is configured to handle VPLS traffic. The MX4 router is configured as a VTEP to accept and decapsulate VXLAN packets.

Topology

Configuration

To configure VXLAN to VPLS stitching with OVSDB:

CLI Quick Configuration

To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level, and then enter commit from configuration mode.

MX1

MX2

MX3

MX4

Configuring MX1

Step-by-Step Procedure

The first router to be configured is the core router. This MX Series router handles Layer 3 traffic and protocols for the rest of the network.

To configure the MX1 router:

  1. Specify the IPv4 address for the loopback interface.
  2. Configure the Layer 3 network.
  3. Enable OSPF on all interfaces.

Configuring MX2

Step-by-Step Procedure

The second router to be configured is the VXLAN gateway router. This MX Series router is configured as a VTEP, and it handles switching for Layer 2, VPLS, and VXLAN.

To configure the MX2 router:

  1. Configure interfaces for the VXLAN gateway.
  2. Set up LAG options
  3. Configure chassis settings.
  4. Configure routing options.
  5. Set up RSVP, MPLS, and BGP protocols.
  6. Configure OSPF interface settings.
  7. Set up OVSDB tracing operations.
  8. Specify that interfaces xe-10/3/0.1 and ge-7/0/9.1 are managed by OVSDB.
  9. Configure a connection with an NSX controller.
  10. Create a VPLS routing instance with VXLAN functionality.
    Note

    After completing this configuration, you must configure a gateway, which is the NSX equivalent of a hardware VTEP. This configuration implements one hardware VTEP, so you must configure one gateway, a gateway service, and a logical switch port using NSX Manager or the NSX API. For more information about the tasks you must perform as well as key NSX Manager configuration details, see VMware NSX Configuration for Juniper Networks Devices Functioning as Virtual Tunnel Endpoints.

Configuring MX3

Step-by-Step Procedure

The third MX Series router must be configured to handle VPLS traffic.

To configure the MX3 router:

  1. Specify the IPv4, IPv6, and ISO addresses for the loopback interface.
  2. Configure the network interfaces.
  3. Set up LAG options
  4. Configure routing options.
  5. Set up RSVP, MPLS, and BGP protocols.
  6. Configure OSPF interface settings.
  7. Create a VPLS routing instance.

Configuring MX4

Step-by-Step Procedure

The fourth MX Series router is configured as a VTEP to accept and decapsulate VXLAN packets.

To configure the MX4 router:

  1. Specify the IPv4, IPv6, and ISO addresses for the loopback interface.
  2. Configure the interfaces.
  3. Configure OSPF interface settings.
  4. Set up OVSDB tracing operations.
  5. Specify that the xe-0/0/0.0 interface is managed by OVSDB.
  6. Configure a connection with an NSX controller.
  7. Configure the VPLS interface.
  8. Configure a set of VXLAN-enabled bridge domains.
  9. Configure the loopback interface to be used as the tunnel source address.
    Note

    After completing this configuration, you must configure a gateway, which is the NSX equivalent of a hardware VTEP. This configuration implements one hardware VTEP, so you must configure one gateway, a gateway service, and a logical switch port using NSX Manager or the NSX API. For more information about the tasks you must perform as well as key NSX Manager configuration details, see “VMware NSX Configuration for Juniper Networks Devices Functioning as Virtual Tunnel Endpoints”.

Results

From configuration mode, confirm your configuration by entering the following commands on each router. If the output does not display the intended configuration, repeat the instructions in this example to correct the configuration.

Verification

Confirm that the configuration is working properly.

Verifying MX1

Purpose

Verify your configuration on MX1.

Action

Verify that the interfaces are configured properly.

user@MX1# show interface

Verify that OSPF is configured correctly.

user@MX1# show protocols

Verifying MX2

Purpose

Verify your configuration on MX2.

Action

Verify that the interfaces are configured properly.

user@MX2# show interfaces

Verify that OSPF is configured properly.

user@MX2# show protocols ospf

Verify that OVSDB is configured properly.

user@MX2# show protocols ovsdb

Verify the default-VS1 routing instance configuration.

user@MX2# show routing-instances

Verify the vrf1 routing instance configuration.

user@MX2# show routing-instances

Verifying MX3

Purpose

Verify your configuration on MX3.

Action

Verify that the interfaces are configured properly.

user@MX3# show interfaces

Verify the RSVP, MPLS, BGP and OSPF protocols are configured properly.

user@MX3# show protocols

Verify the VPLS routing instance configuration.

user@MX3# show routing-instances

Verifying MX4

Purpose

Verify your configuration on MX4.

Action

Verify that the global group interfaces are configured properly.

user@MX4# show groups global interfaces

Verify that the interfaces are configured properly.

user@MX4# show interfaces

Verify that the OSPF interface settings are configured properly.

user@MX4# show protocols ospf

Verify that OVSDB is configured properly.

user@MX4# show protocols ovsdb

Verify the default-VS1 routing instance configuration and bridge domains.

user@MX4# show routing-instances default-VS1

Verify that the bridge domains are configured properly.

user@MX4# show bridge-domains

Verify that the loopback interface is used as the tunnel source address.

user@MX4# show switch-options