Interface Naming Overview

 

Each interface has an interface name, which specifies the media type, the slot in which the FPC or DPC is located, the location on the FPC where the PIC is installed, and the PIC or DPC port. The interface name uniquely identifies an individual network connector in the system. You use the interface name when configuring interfaces and when enabling various functions and properties, such as routing protocols, on individual interfaces. The system uses the interface name when displaying information about the interface, for example, in the show interfaces command.

The interface name is represented by a physical part, a channel part, and a logical part in the following format:

The channel part of the name is optional for all interfaces except channelized DS3, E1, OC12, and STM1 interfaces.

The following sections provide interface naming configuration guidelines:

Physical Part of an Interface Name

The physical part of an interface name identifies the physical device, which corresponds to a single physical network connector.

Note

The internal interface is dependent on the Routing Engine. To identify if the Routing Engine is using this type of interface, use the following command:

show interfaces terse

user@host> show interfaces terse

For more information on the Routing Engines that each chassis supports, the first supported release for the Routing Engine in the specified chassis, the management Ethernet interface, and the internal Ethernet interfaces for each Routing Engine, please refer the link titled Supported Routing Engines by Chassis under Related Documentation section.

This part of the interface name has the following format:

type is the media type, which identifies the network device that can be one of the following:

  • ae—Aggregated Ethernet interface. This is a virtual aggregated link and has a different naming format from most PICs; for more information, see Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces Overview.

  • as—Aggregated SONET/SDH interface. This is a virtual aggregated link and has a different naming format from most PICs; for more information, see Configuring Aggregated SONET/SDH Interfaces.

  • at—ATM1 or ATM2 intelligent queuing (IQ) interface or a virtual ATM interface on a circuit emulation (CE) interface.

  • bcm—The bcm0 internal Ethernet process is supported on specific Routing engines for various M series and T series routers. For more information please refer the link titled Supported Routing Engines by Chassis under Related Documentation section.

  • cau4—Channelized AU-4 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized STM1 IQ or IQE PIC or Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE PICs).

  • ce1—Channelized E1 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized E1 IQ PIC or Channelized STM1 IQ or IQE PIC).

  • ci—Container interface.

  • coc1—Channelized OC1 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE or Channelized OC3 IQ and IQE PICs).

  • coc3—Channelized OC3 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized OC3 IQ and IQE PICs).

  • coc12—Channelized OC12 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE PICs).

  • coc48—Channelized OC48 interface (configured on the Channelized OC48 and Channelized OC48 IQE PICs).

  • cp—Collector interface (configured on the Monitoring Services II PIC).

  • cstm1—Channelized STM1 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized STM1 IQ or IQE PIC).

  • cstm4—Channelized STM4 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE PICs).

  • cstm16—Channelized STM16 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized OC48/STM16 and Channelized OC48/STM16 IQE PICs).

  • ct1—Channelized T1 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized DS3 IQ and IQE PICs, Channelized OC3 IQ and IQE PICs, Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE PICs, or Channelized T1 IQ PIC).

  • ct3—Channelized T3 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized DS3 IQ and IQE PICs, Channelized OC3 IQ and IQE PICs, or Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE PICs).

  • demux—Interface that supports logical IP interfaces that use the IP source or destination address to demultiplex received packets. Only one demux interface (demux0) exists per chassis. All demux logical interfaces must be associated with an underlying logical interface.

  • dfc—Interface that supports dynamic flow capture processing on T Series or M320 routers containing one or more Monitoring Services III PICs. Dynamic flow capture enables you to capture packet flows on the basis of dynamic filtering criteria. Specifically, you can use this feature to forward passively monitored packet flows that match a particular filter list to one or more destinations using an on-demand control protocol.

  • ds—DS0 interface (configured on the Multichannel DS3 PIC, Channelized E1 PIC, Channelized OC3 IQ and IQE PICs, Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE PICs, Channelized DS3 IQ and IQE PICs, Channelized E1 IQ PIC, Channelized STM1 IQ or IQE PIC, or Channelized T1 IQ).

  • dsc—Discard interface.

  • e1—E1 interface (including channelized STM1-to-E1 interfaces).

  • e3—E3 interface (including E3 IQ interfaces).

  • em—Management and internal Ethernet interfaces. For M Series routers, MX Series routers, T Series routers, and TX Series routers, you can use the show chassis hardware command to display hardware information about the router, including its Routing Engine model. To determine which management interface is supported on your router and Routing Engine combination, see Understanding Management Ethernet Interfaces and Supported Routing Engines by Router.

  • es—Encryption interface.

  • et—100-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces (10, 40, and 100-Gigabit Ethernet interface for PTX Series Packet Transport Routers only).

  • fe—Fast Ethernet interface.

  • fxp—Management and internal Ethernet interfaces. For M Series routers, MX Series routers, T Series routers, and TX Series routers, you can use the show chassis hardware command to display hardware information about the router, including its Routing Engine model. To determine which management interface is supported on your router and Routing Engine combination, see Understanding Management Ethernet Interfaces and Supported Routing Engines by Router.

  • ge—Gigabit Ethernet interface.

    Note
    • The XENPAK 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface PIC, which is supported only on M series routers, is configured using the ge interface naming convention instead of the xe interface naming convention. Refer the following show commands for more information:

      show chassis hardware

      user@host> show chassis hardware

      show configuration interfaces

      user@host> show configuration interfaces ge-4/0/0
    • In MX and SRX series devices, the 1 and 10-Gigabit SFP or SFP+ optical interfaces are always named as xe even if a 1-Gigabit SFP is inserted. However, in EX and QFX series devices, the interface name is shown as ge or xe based on the speed of the optical device inserted.

  • gr—Generic routing encapsulation (GRE) tunnel interface.

  • gre—Internally generated interface that is configurable only as the control channel for Generalized MPLS (GMPLS). For more information about GMPLS, see the MPLS Applications Feature Guide.

    Note

    You can configure GRE interfaces (gre-x/y/z) only for GMPLS control channels. GRE interfaces are not supported or configurable for other applications..

  • ip—IP-over-IP encapsulation tunnel interface.

  • ipip—Internally generated interface that is not configurable.

  • ixgbe—The internal Ethernet process ixgbe0 and ixgbe1 are used by the RE-DUO-C2600-16G Routing Engine, which is supported on TX Matrix Plus and PTX5000.

  • iw—Logical interfaces associated with the endpoints of Layer 2 circuit and Layer 2 VPN connections (pseudowire stitching Layer 2 VPNs). For more information about VPNs, see the Junos OS VPNs Library for Routing Devices.

  • lc—Internally generated interface that is not configurable.

  • lo—Loopback interface. The Junos OS automatically configures one loopback interface (lo0). The logical interface lo0.16383 is a nonconfigurable interface for router control traffic.

  • ls—Link services interface.

  • lsi—Internally generated interface that is not configurable.

  • ml—Multilink interface (including Multilink Frame Relay and MLPPP).

  • mo—Monitoring services interface (including monitoring services and monitoring services II). The logical interface mo-fpc/pic/port.16383 is an internally generated, nonconfigurable interface for router control traffic.

  • ms—Multiservices interface.

  • mt—Multicast tunnel interface (internal router interface for VPNs). If your router has a Tunnel PIC, the Junos OS automatically configures one multicast tunnel interface (mt) for each virtual private network (VPN) you configure. Although it is not necessary to configure multicast interfaces, you can use the multicast-only statement to configure the unit and family so that the tunnel can transmit and receive multicast traffic only. For more information, see multicast-only.

  • mtun—Internally generated interface that is not configurable.

  • oc3—OC3 IQ interface (configured on the Channelized OC12 IQ and IQE PICs or Channelized OC3 IQ and IQE PICs).

  • pd—Interface on the rendezvous point (RP) that de-encapsulates packets.

  • pe—Interface on the first-hop PIM router that encapsulates packets destined for the RP router.

  • pimd—Internally generated interface that is not configurable.

  • pime—Internally generated interface that is not configurable.

  • rlsq—Container interface, numbered from 0 through 127, used to tie the primary and secondary LSQ PICs together in high availability configurations. Any failure of the primary PIC results in a switch to the secondary PIC and vice versa.

  • rms—Redundant interface for two multiservices interfaces.

  • rsp—Redundant virtual interface for the adaptive services interface.

  • se—Serial interface (including EIA-530, V.35, and X.21 interfaces).

  • si—Services-inline interface, which is hosted on a Trio-based line card.

  • so—SONET/SDH interface.

  • sp—Adaptive services interface. The logical interface sp-fpc/pic/port.16383 is an internally generated, nonconfigurable interface for router control traffic.

  • stm1—STM1 interface (configured on the OC3/STM1 interfaces).

  • stm4—STM4 interface (configured on the OC12/STM4 interfaces).

  • stm16—STM16 interface (configured on the OC48/STM16 interfaces).

  • t1—T1 interface (including channelized DS3-to-DS1 interfaces).

  • t3—T3 interface (including channelized OC12-to-DS3 interfaces).

  • tap—Internally generated interface that is not configurable.

  • umd—USB modem interface.

  • vsp—Voice services interface.

  • vc4—Virtually concatenated interface.

  • vt—Virtual loopback tunnel interface.

  • xe—10-Gigabit Ethernet interface. Some older 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces use the ge media type (rather than xe) to identify the physical part of the network device.

  • xt—Logical interface for Protected System Domains to establish a Layer 2 tunnel connection.

fpc identifies the number of the FPC or DPC card on which the physical interface is located. Specifically, it is the number of the slot in which the card is installed.

M40, M40e, M160, M320, M120, T320, T640, and T1600 routers each have eight FPC slots that are numbered 0 through 7, from left to right as you are facing the front of the chassis. For information about compatible FPCs and PICs, see the hardware guide for your router.

On PTX1000 routers, the FPC number is always 0.

The M20 router has four FPC slots that are numbered 0 through 3, from top to bottom as you are facing the front of the chassis. The slot number is printed adjacent to each slot.

MX Series routers support DPCs, FPCs, and Modular Interface Cards (MICs). For information about compatible DPCs, FPCs, PICs, and MICs, see the MX Series Interface Module Reference.

For M5, M7i, M10, and M10i routers, the FPCs are built into the chassis; you install the PICs into the chassis.

The M5 and M7i routers have space for up to four PICs. The M7i router also comes with an integrated Tunnel PIC, or an optional integrated AS PIC, or an optional integrated MS PIC.

The M10 and M10i routers have space for up to eight PICs.

A routing matrix can have up to 32 FPCs (numbered 0 through 31).

For more information about interface naming for a routing matrix, see Interface Naming for a Routing Matrix Based on a TX Matrix Router.

pic identifies the number of the PIC on which the physical interface is located. Specifically, it is the number of the PIC location on the FPC. FPCs with four PIC slots are numbered 0 through 3. FPCs with three PIC slots are numbered 0 through 2. The PIC location is printed on the FPC carrier board. For PICs that occupy more than one PIC slot, the lower PIC slot number identifies the PIC location.

port identifies a specific port on a PIC or DPC. The number of ports varies depending on the PIC. The port numbers are printed on the PIC.

Logical Part of an Interface Name

The logical unit part of the interface name corresponds to the logical unit number, which can be a number from 0 through 16,385 for all interface types except demux and PPPoE. For these two interface types only, the range is 0 through 65,535.

In the virtual part of the name, a period (.) separates the port and logical unit numbers:

  • Other platforms:

Separators in an Interface Name

There is a separator between each element of an interface name.

In the physical part of the name, a hyphen (-) separates the media type from the FPC number, and a slash (/) separates the FPC, PIC, and port numbers.

In the virtual part of the name, a period (.) separates the channel and logical unit numbers.

A colon (:) separates the physical and virtual parts of the interface name.

Channel Part of an Interface Name

The channel identifier part of the interface name is required only on channelized interfaces. For channelized interfaces, channel 0 identifies the first channelized interface. For channelized IQ and channelized IQE interfaces, channel 1 identifies the first channelized interface. A nonconcatenated (that is, channelized) SONET/SDH OC48 interface has four OC12 channels, numbered 0 through 3.

To determine which types of channelized PICs are currently installed in the router, use the show chassis hardware command from the top level of the command-line interface (CLI). Channelized IQ and IQE PICs are listed in the output with “intelligent queuing IQ” or “enhanced intelligent queuing IQE” in the description. For more information, see Channelized Interfaces Overview.

For ISDN interfaces, you specify the B-channel in the form bc-pim/0/port:n. n is the B-channel ID and can be 1 or 2. You specify the D-channel in the form dc-pim/0/port:0.

Note

For ISDN, the B-channel and D-channel interfaces do not have any configurable parameters. However, when interface statistics are displayed, B-channel and D-channel interfaces have statistical values.

Note

In the Junos OS implementation, the term logical interfaces generally refers to interfaces you configure by including the unit statement at the [edit interfaces interface-name] hierarchy level. Logical interfaces have the .logical descriptor at the end of the interface name, as in ge-0/0/0.1 or t1-0/0/0:0.1, where the logical unit number is 1.

Although channelized interfaces are generally thought of as logical or virtual, the Junos OS sees T3, T1, and NxDS0 interfaces within a channelized IQ or IQE PIC as physical interfaces. For example, both t3-0/0/0 and t3-0/0/0:1 are treated as physical interfaces by the Junos OS. In contrast, t3-0/0/0.2 and t3-0/0/0:1.2 are considered logical interfaces because they have the .2 at the end of the interface names.

Interface Naming for a Routing Matrix Based on a TX Matrix Router

A routing matrix based on a Juniper Networks TX Matrix router is a multichassis architecture composed of one TX Matrix router and from one to four interconnected T640 routers. From the perspective of the user interface, the routing matrix appears as a single router. The TX Matrix router controls all the T640 routers, as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Routing Matrix
Routing Matrix

A TX Matrix router is also referred to as a switch-card chassis (SCC). The CLI uses scc to refer to the TX Matrix router. A T640 router in a routing matrix is also referred to as a line-card chassis (LCC). The CLI uses lcc as a prefix to refer to a specific T640 router.

LCCs are assigned numbers 0 through 3, depending on the hardware setup and connectivity to the TX Matrix router. For more information, see the TX Matrix Router Hardware Guide. A routing matrix can have up to four T640 routers, and each T640 router has up to eight FPCs. Therefore, the routing matrix as a whole can have up to 32 FPCs (0 through 31).

In the Junos OS CLI, an interface name has the following format:

When you specify the fpc number for a T640 router in a routing matrix, the Junos OS determines which T640 router contains the specified FPC based on the following assignment:

  • On LCC 0, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 0 through 7.

  • On LCC 1, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 8 through 15.

  • On LCC 2, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 16 through 23.

  • On LCC 3, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 24 through 31.

For example, the 1 in se-1/0/0 refers to FPC hardware slot 1 on the T640 router labeled lcc0. The 11 in t1-11/2/0 refers to FPC hardware slot 3 on the T640 router labeled lcc1. The 20 in so-20/0/1 refers to FPC hardware slot 4 on the T640 router labeled lcc2. The 31 in t3-31/1/0 refers to FPC hardware slot 7 on the T640 router labeled lcc3.

Table 1 summarizes the FPC numbering for a T640 router in a routing matrix.

Table 1: FPC Numbering for T640 Routers in a Routing Matrix

LCC Numbers Assigned to the T640 Router

Configuration Numbers

0

0 through 7

1

8 through 15

2

16 through 23

3

24 through 31

Table 2 lists each FPC hardware slot and the corresponding configuration numbers for LCCs 0 through 3.

Table 2: One-to-One FPC Numbering for T640 Routers in a Routing Matrix

FPC Numbering

T640 Routers

 

LCC 0
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

LCC 1
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

LCC 2
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

LCC 3
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Interface Naming for a Routing Matrix Based on a TX Matrix Plus Router

A routing matrix based on a Juniper Networks TX Matrix Plus Router is a multichassis architecture composed of one TX Matrix Plus router and from one to four interconnected T1600 routers. From the perspective of the user interface, the routing matrix appears as a single router. The TX Matrix Plus router controls all the T1600 routers, as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2: Routing Matrix Based on a TX Matrix Plus Router
Routing Matrix
Based on a TX Matrix Plus Router

A TX Matrix Plus router is also referred to as a switch-fabric chassis (SFC). The CLI uses sfc to refer to the TX Matrix Plus router. A T1600 router in a routing matrix is also referred to as a line-card chassis (LCC). The CLI uses lcc as a prefix to refer to a specific T1600 router.

LCCs are assigned numbers, 0 through 3, depending on the hardware setup and connectivity to the TX Matrix Plus router. For more information, see the TX Matrix Plus Router Hardware Guide. A routing matrix based on a TX Matrix Plus router can have up to four T1600 routers, and each T1600 router has up to eight FPCs. Therefore, the routing matrix as a whole can have up to 32 FPCs (0 through 31).

In the Junos OS CLI, an interface name has the following format:

When you specify the fpc number for a T1600 router in a routing matrix, the Junos OS determines which T1600 router contains the specified FPC based on the following assignment:

  • On LCC 0, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 0 through 7.

  • On LCC 1, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 8 through 15.

  • On LCC 2, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 16 through 23.

  • On LCC 3, FPC hardware slots 0 through 7 are configured as 24 through 31.

For example, the 1 in se-1/0/0 refers to FPC hardware slot 1 on the T1600 router labeled lcc0. The 11 in t1-11/2/0 refers to FPC hardware slot 3 on the T1600 router labeled lcc1. The 20 in so-20/0/1 refers to FPC hardware slot 4 on the T1600 router labeled lcc2. The 31 in t3-31/1/0 refers to FPC hardware slot 7 on the T1600 router labeled lcc3.

Table 3 summarizes the FPC numbering for a routing matrix based on a TX Matrix Plus router.

Table 3: FPC Numbering for T1600 Routers in a Routing Matrix

LCC Numbers Assigned to the T1600 Router

Configuration Numbers

0

0 through 7

1

8 through 15

2

16 through 23

3

24 through 31

Table 4 lists each FPC hardware slot and the corresponding configuration numbers for LCCs 0 through 3.

Table 4: One-to-One FPC Numbering for T1600 Routers in a Routing Matrix

FPC Numbering

T1600 Routers

 

LCC 0
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

LCC 1
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

LCC 2
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

LCC 3
Hardware Slots

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Configuration Numbers

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Chassis Interface Naming

You configure some PIC properties, such as framing, at the [edit chassis] hierarchy level. Chassis interface naming varies depending on the routing hardware.

  • To configure PIC properties for a standalone router, you must specify the FPC and PIC numbers, as follows:

  • To configure PIC properties for a T640 or T1600 router configured in a routing matrix, you must specify the LCC, FPC, and PIC numbers, as follows:

    For the FPC slot in a T640 router in a routing matrix, specify the actual hardware slot number, as labeled on the T640 router chassis. Do not use the corresponding software FPC configuration numbers shown in Table 2.

    For the FPC slot in a T1600 router in a routing matrix, specify the actual hardware slot number, as labeled on the T1600 router chassis. Do not use the corresponding software FPC configuration numbers shown in Table 3.

For more information about the [edit chassis] hierarchy, see the Junos OS Administration Library.

Examples: Interface Naming

This section provides examples of naming interfaces. For an illustration of where slots, PICs, and ports are located, see Figure 3.

Figure 3: Interface Slot, PIC, and Port Locations
Interface Slot, PIC, and Port Locations

For an FPC in slot 1 with two OC3 SONET/SDH PICs in PIC positions 0 and 1, each PIC with two ports uses the following names:

An OC48 SONET/SDH PIC in slot 1 and in concatenated mode appears as a single FPC with a single PIC, which has a single port. If this interface has a single logical unit, it has the following name:

An OC48 SONET/SDH PIC in slot 1 and in channelized mode has a number for each channel. For example:

For an FPC in slot 1 with a Channelized OC12 PIC in PIC position 2, the DS3 channels have the following names:

For an FPC in slot 1 with four OC12 ATM PICs (the FPC is fully populated), the four PICs, each with a single port and a single logical unit, have the following names:

In a routing matrix on the T640 router labeled lcc1, for an FPC in slot 5 with four SONET OC192 PICs, the four PICs, each with a single port and a single logical unit, have the following names:

For an FPC in slot 1 with one 4-port ISDN BRI interface card, port 4 has the following name:

The first B-channel, the second B-channel, and the control channel have the following names: