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Interfaces That Support Filter-Based Tunneling Across IPv4 Networks

 

You can attach IPv4 encapsulation and de-encapsulation firewall filters to the input of Ethernet logical interfaces or aggregated Ethernet interfaces hosted on Modular Interface Cards (MICs) or Modular Port Concentrators (MPCs) in MX Series routers.

Note

Filter-based generic routing encapsulation (GRE) tunneling is supported on PTX Series routers only when network services is set to enhanced-mode. For more information, see enhanced-mode.

Interfaces on MX240, MX480, MX960, MX2010, and MX2020 Routers

On MX240, MX480, MX960, MX2010, and MX2020 routers, firewall filter actions for IPv4 tunneling are supported on Ethernet logical interfaces or aggregated Ethernet interfaces configured on the following types of ports:

  • Ports on MICs that insert into slots in MPCs, which have two Packet Forwarding Engines.

  • Ports on a 16-port 10-Gigabit Ethernet MPC (MPC-3D-16XGE-SFPP), a specialized fixed-configuration MPC that has four Packet Forwarding Engines and contains no slots for MICs.

For these physical interfaces, Trio chipset-based Packet Forwarding Engine processes operate in fabric mode to provide forwarding and storage functions and lookup and processing functions between Ethernet interfaces and the routing fabric of the chassis.

For information about MPCs, see MX Series MPC Overview and MPCs Supported by MX Series Routers. For information about MICs, see MX Series MIC Overview and MICs Supported by MX Series Routers.

Interfaces on MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 Routers

On the MX Series midrange family of routers (MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 routers), firewall filter actions for IPv4 tunneling are supported on Ethernet logical interfaces and aggregated Ethernet interfaces configured on ports on a built-in MIC or on MICs that install into dedicated slots in the router chassis.

  • The MX80 router—available as a modular (MX80) or fixed (MX80-48T) chassis—has a built-in 4-port 10-Gigabit Ethernet MIC. The modular chassis has two dedicated slots for MICs. The fixed chassis has 48 built-in tri-rate (10/100/1000Base-T) RJ-45 ports in place of two front-pluggable MIC slots.

  • On the MX40 router, only the first two of the four built-in 10-Gigabit Ethernet MIC ports are enabled. As with the modular MX80, the two front-pluggable MIC slots are enabled and support dual-wide MICs that span the two slots.

  • The MX5 and MX10 routers are pre-populated with a front-pluggable 20-port Gigabit Ethernet MIC with SFP, and none of the four built-in 10-Gigabit Ethernet MIC ports is enabled. The MX10 supports MICs in both front-pluggable slots, but the MX5 supports MICs in the second slot only.

For more information, see MX5, MX10, MX40, and MX80 Modular Interface Card Description.

The MX Series midrange routers have no switching fabric, and the single Packet Forwarding Engine resides on the base board of the chassis and operates in standalone mode. In standalone mode, the Packet Forwarding Engine provides—in addition to forwarding and storage functions and lookup and processing functions—hierarchical queuing, congestion management, and granular statistical functions.

CLI Commit Check for Filter-Based Tunneling Across IPv4 Networks

If you commit a configuration that attaches an encapsulating or de-encapsulating firewall filter to an interface that does not support filter-based tunneling across IPv4 networks, a system event writes a syslog warning message that the interface does not support the filter.