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    Understanding Interfaces on an FCoE-FC Gateway

    When a QFX3500 switch functions as an FCoE-FC gateway to connect FCoE devices on an Ethernet network to a Fibre Channel (FC) switch in a storage area network (SAN), it handles FCoE traffic from hosts and native FC traffic from the FC switch. To support this architecture, each local FC fabric configured on the gateway (in the fc-fabrics configuration hierarchy) must have:

    • An Ethernet-network-facing F_Port interface for the FCoE VLAN to connect to FCoE device VN_Ports in the form of an FCoE VLAN interface. Multiple VF_Ports are initiated on the F_Port interface, one VF_Port for each ENode that logs in to the FC network.
    • One or two blocks of six proxy N_Port (NP_Port) interfaces to connect to FC switch fabric ports (F_Ports).

    Each FC fabric is local to the gateway on which you configure it. This means that both the FC switch and the FCoE devices must be connected to the same gateway (QFX3500 switch or QFabric system Node device), and that all of the interfaces configured for the local fabric also must be on that gateway. FC fabric traffic does not flow between different Node devices in a QFabric system.

    This topic describes:

    Native FC Interfaces to the FC Switch

    You must configure either 6 or 12 of the physical interfaces on the gateway as native FC NP_Port interfaces to connect to FC switch F_Port interfaces. By default, all of the gateway interfaces are Ethernet interfaces, so you must explicitly configure the interfaces that you want to use as FC interfaces.

    You can configure the FC-capable ports xe-0/0/0 through xe-0/0/5 as fc-0/0/0 through fc-0/0/5, and ports xe-0/0/42 through xe-0/0/47 as fc-0/0/42 through fc-0/0/47 to create blocks of native FC interfaces. You cannot individually configure a single port as a native FC interface. Within these port blocks, you cannot mix FC interfaces with Ethernet interfaces. All of the ports in a block must be either native FC interfaces or Ethernet interfaces.

    You cannot configure ports xe-0/0/6 through xe-0/0/41 and ports xe-0/1/1 through xe-0/1/15 as native FC ports; they can only be Ethernet ports. Native FC ports do not handle Ethernet traffic (including FCoE traffic); they handle only native FC traffic and must connect to native FC ports.

    You can configure:

    • Six native FC interfaces by configuring either ports xe-0/0/0 through xe-0/0/5 as fc-0/0/0 through fc-0/0/5 or ports xe-0/0/42 through xe-0/0/47 as fc-0/0/42 through fc-0/0/47.
    • Twelve native FC interfaces by configuring ports xe-0/0/0 through xe-0/0/5 as fc-0/0/0 through fc-0/0/5 and ports xe-0/0/42 through xe-0/0/47 as fc-0/0/42 through fc-0/0/47.
    • No native FC interfaces by leaving ports xe-0/0/0 through xe-0/0/5 and ports xe-0/0/42 through xe-0/0/47 in their default state as Ethernet interfaces.

    Each native FC interface can belong to only one local FC fabric configured on the gateway. You can configure up to 12 FC fabrics on a gateway, but each FC fabric must use different native FC interfaces to connect to an FCF. (Although the native FC ports are configured in blocks, each individual port can belong to a different FC fabric.) Native FC interfaces can be configured as loopback interfaces.


    Port Mode

    The gateway presents a proxy N_Port (NP_Port) interface to the FC switch. An NP_Port connects to a single FC switch F_Port using a point-to-point link (in other architectures an N_Port can also connect in a point-to-point link to another N_Port, but that is not a valid configuration on the gateway).

    You must explicitly configure each native FC interface connected to an FC switch as an NP_Port. The gateway NP_Ports act as a proxy for the FCoE device virtual N_Ports (VN_Ports) when the VN_Ports attempt to connect to the FC switch.

    When the FC switch is a trusted switch, configure the fabric as fcoe-trusted to reduce overhead caused by the VN_Port to VF_Port (VN2VF_Port) FIP snooping filters that are automatically installed on untrusted ports.

    NPIV

    FC requires a unique point-to-point link between the FC switch and each host N_Port. The gateway creates an independent virtual link for each FCoE device session by mapping each FCoE device to a virtualized N_Port through the gateway’s proxy function. This process is called N_Port ID virtualization (NPIV).

    NPIV makes each virtual link look like a dedicated point-to-point link to the FC switch. In this way, multiple FCoE devices, multiple applications, and multiple virtual machines on an FCoE device can connect to an FC switch using one physical port instead of using a physical port for each host connection. The virtual link creates a secure boundary between traffic from different sources that are on a single physical port.

    FCoE-FC gateway mode implements NPIV as follows:

    1. An NP_Port on the gateway comes up and logs in to the attached F_Port on the FC switch. The FC switch sees the gateway port as a physical FC device N_Port and assigns it a unique FCID. This establishes the physical point-to-point link between the gateway and the FC switch.
    2. The gateway receives a FIP discovery message from an FCoE device that seeks to log in to the FC network. To the FCoE device, the gateway presents a virtual F_Port (VF_Port) interface and appears to be an FCF.
    3. The gateway converts the FCoE device’s message into an FC fabric discovery (FDISC) message and sends it through the least-loaded physical NP_Port to the FC switch. The FDISC message requests an FCID for the new virtual link.
    4. The FC switch processes the request, accepts it, assigns a unique FCID for the connection, and sends the response.
    5. The gateway maps the FC switch response to the host FCoE device’s VN_Port and sends a FIP acceptance advertisement to the FCoE device.
    6. The FCoE device accepts the FCID.

    If the FC switch rejects the FDISC, the gateway relays the rejection to the FCoE device VN_Port.

    Port Speed

    The gateway supports configuring FC port speeds of 2 Gbps, 4 Gbps, or 8 Gbps. FC ports can also autonegotiate the port speed to 2, 4, or 8 Gbps.

    FIP Login Session Limits

    A FIP login session is a fabric login (FLOGI) or fabric discovery (FDISC) login to the FC SAN fabric. (A session here does not refer to an end-to-end server-to-storage session; there is no limit to the number of end-to-end server-to-storage sessions.) You can limit the maximum number of FIP login sessions on each gateway Node device (QFX3500 switch or QFabric system Node device configured in FCoE-FC gateway mode), on each local gateway FC fabric, and on each individual NP_Port interface in a local FC fabric:

    • Gateway Node devices and Node groups—The total number of FIP login sessions on the gateway Node or Node group (the sum of the sessions on all of the NP_Port interfaces in all of the local FC fabrics on the gateway Node or Nodes) cannot exceed the limit. When a gateway reaches the maximum session limit, the gateway sends subsequent multicast discovery advertisements (MDAs) with the availability bit set to 0 (zero) to prevent additional ENode login attempts. If the maximum number of sessions is running on the gateway, ENodes cannot use the gateway to log in new sessions to the FC switch. When the number of sessions falls below the maximum, the gateway sets the availability bit in MDAs to 1 so that ENodes can again log in new sessions. When a session slot becomes available, the system accepts the first session request to fill the slot.
    • FC fabric—The total number of FIP login sessions on an FC fabric (the sum of the sessions on all of the NP_Port interfaces that belong to the fabric) cannot exceed the limit. When a fabric reaches the maximum session limit, the gateway sends MDAs associated with that fabric with the availability bit set to 0 to prevent additional ENode login attempts.

      Note: Other FC fabrics on the same gateway can still accept ENode logins as long as the maximum session limit for those fabrics and the maximum session limit for the gateway (the Node device) have not been met.

    • NP_Port interfaces—The total number of FIP login sessions cannot exceed the interface’s limit. When an interface reaches the maximum session limit, the gateway removes it from the load-balancing list for that FC fabric to prevent the gateway from attempting to assign new sessions to the interface. Other interfaces in the FC fabric can still accept logins until the FC fabric or gateway reaches its maximum session limit. However, the interface that reached the maximum session limit cannot be assigned new sessions until the number of sessions on the interface falls below the limit.

      Best Practice: Configure a maximum session limit for each NP_Port interface that is less than or equal to the number of FIP sessions the directly connected FC switch port is configured to support. This prevents the gateway from attempting to assign new login sessions to an interface when the connected FC switch port reaches its maximum number of sessions.

    FCoE Trusted and Untrusted Interface Session Limits

    The maximum number of VN2VF_Port FCoE login sessions that each gateway can support is 2500 sessions, regardless of whether interfaces are trusted or untrusted. (In software releases earlier than Junos OS Release 12.3, the session limit on untrusted interfaces and untrusted fabrics was 376 sessions.)

    Note: If you configure an FCoE LAG on interfaces that are members of an FCoE-FC gateway fabric, the number of supported sessions depends on whether the FC fabric (fc-fabric) is an FCoE trusted fabric or an FCoE untrusted fabric. If the FC fabric is a trusted fabric, then 2,500 sessions are supported.

    However, if the FC fabric is an untrusted fabric, you must disable FIP snooping session scaling on the gateway, which decreases the number of supported sessions to 376 sessions. (Disable FIP snooping scaling by including the no-fip-snooping-scaling option in the [edit fc-options] hierarchy.)

    Configuring Consistent Session Limits

    The system does not perform commit checks to enforce consistent session limit configuration. For example, the system does not prevent you from configuring a higher limit for ENode sessions than the total session limit for the gateway Node device, or from configuring a higher limit on an interface than on the fabric to which the interface belongs.

    To prevent unexpected FIP login rejections, you should configure consistent Node device, fabric, and interface session limits. For example:

    • The session limit of an interface should not exceed the session limit of the fabric to which it belongs.
    • For interfaces that belong to the same fabric, the sum of the interface session limits should not exceed the fabric session limit.
    • The fabric session limit should not exceed the session limit of the gateway Node device.
    • For fabrics that belong to the same gateway Node device, the sum of the fabric session limits should not exceed the Node device session limit.

    Session limit configuration considerations include:

    • The fabric session limit restricts how many sessions can run on the NP_Port interfaces that belong to that fabric. If the combined session limits of the interfaces exceed the fabric session limit, the total number of sessions on the interfaces is the fabric limit.

      For example, if a fabric has three NP_Port interfaces, and each NP_Port interface has a limit of 500 sessions (total of 1500 sessions for the three interfaces), but the fabric has a limit of 1000 sessions, the combined number of sessions on the three interfaces is limited to 1000 sessions.

    • The gateway Node device session limit restricts how many sessions can run on the fabrics that belong to that gateway. If the combined session limits of the fabrics exceed the gateway Node device session limit, the total number of sessions on the fabrics is the gateway Node device limit.

      For example, if a gateway has two fabrics, and each fabric has a limit of 1000 sessions (total of 2000 sessions for the two fabrics), but the gateway has a limit of 1500 sessions, the combined number of sessions on the two fabrics is limited to 1500 sessions.

    Hierarchically, the gateway Node device session limit is the maximum limit for all sessions on the gateway, regardless of fabric and interface session limits. In the same way, the fabric session limit supersedes the interface session limit.

    When session limits are exceeded, no new logins are accepted until a session slot becomes free.

    Decreasing Session Limits

    If you decrease the session limit, the currently logged in sessions are terminated as follows:

    • Gateway Node devices and Node groups—Decreasing the session limit terminates all of the sessions on the Node device (all sessions on all interfaces on all fabrics). If the gateway Node device is part of a Node group, all sessions on all members of the Node group are terminated.
    • Fabric—Decreasing the session limit terminates all of the sessions on all of the interfaces that belong to the fabric.
    • NP_Port interfaces—Decreasing the session limit terminates all of the sessions on the interface and also terminates all of the sessions on any other interfaces that belong to the same fabric.

    After you decrease a session limit, the sessions are terminated even if the new session limit is greater than the number of currently active sessions. For example:

    • An interface has 300 active sessions.
    • The current session limit is 1000 sessions.
    • You decrease the session limit to 500 sessions and commit the new configuration.
    • All 300 sessions are logged out, even though the new session limit is greater than the number of sessions running.

    After the session limit change takes effect, the ENodes log in again and establish new sessions, up to the new session limits.

    Increasing Session Limits

    Increasing the session limits does not disrupt logged in sessions.

    Effect of Deactivating and Then Reactivating the Configuration on Session Limits

    If you decrease session limits, all ENodes are logged out. Deactivating and then reactivating the configuration can have the same effect as decreasing the session limit, which results in the ENodes being logged out.

    The ENode logouts occur because when you deactivate the configuration, the system reverts to the default session limit of 2500 sessions (the maximum number of sessions). When you reactivate the configuration, the system uses the configured session limit. Unless the configured session limit is equal to the maximum session limit, reactivating the configuration decreases the session limit, which causes the ENodes to be logged out.

    For example, if you:

    1. Configure and commit a limit of 400 sessions.
    2. Allow ENodes to log in and start sessions.
    3. Deactivate the configuration.
    4. Reactivate the configuration.
    5. The ENode sessions are logged out because deactivating the session increased the session limit from 400 to 2500.

    Because an increase in the session limit does not affect existing sessions, the running ENode sessions are not affected. However, reactivating the configuration decreased the session limit from 2500 back to 400. The session limit decrease causes the ENode sessions to be logged out.

    Trusted and Untrusted Interfaces

    By default, gateway fabric interfaces are untrusted interfaces. If you do not configure a gateway fabric as an FCoE trusted fabric to set all of the gateway fabric interfaces as trusted interfaces, the gateway installs VN2VF_Port FIP snooping filters on the fabric ports.

    If you configure a gateway fabric as an FCoE trusted fabric, the gateway does not install VN2VF_Port FIP snooping filters on the fabric interfaces. This is usually done when the gateway is connected to an FCoE transit switch that has VN2VF_Port FIP snooping enabled.

    Regardless of whether an interface is trusted or untrusted, the maximum session limit is 2500 sessions, unless the interface is a member of an FCoE LAG interface.

    Note: If you configure an FCoE LAG on interfaces that are members of an FCoE-FC gateway fabric, the number of supported sessions depends on whether the FC fabric (fc-fabric) is an FCoE trusted fabric or an FCoE untrusted fabric. If the FC fabric is a trusted fabric, then 2,500 sessions are supported.

    However, if the FC fabric is an untrusted fabric, you must disable FIP snooping session scaling on the gateway, which decreases the number of supported sessions to 376 sessions. (Disable FIP snooping scaling by including the no-fip-snooping-scaling option in the [edit fc-options] hierarchy.)

    Note: The session limit for a Node group is the same as the session limit for an individual Node device, 2500 sessions. Even if more than one Node device in a Node group is acting as an FCoE-FC gateway, the total maximum number of sessions on all Node devices in the Node group is 2500 sessions.

    The default maximum login session value for Node devices (on QFabric systems, the maximum applies to each Node device), FC fabrics, and interfaces in fabrics is 2500 sessions.

    Buffer-to-Buffer Credit Recovery

    Buffer-to-buffer credits represent the number of receive buffers an interface can use to store FC frames. Buffer-to-buffer credit determines buffer-to-buffer flow control. When an interface transmits a frame, it decrements its buffer-to-buffer credit count by one. When the destination interface forwards the frame and frees a buffer, it sends a receiver ready (R_RDY) primitive to the transmitting interface. Each R_RDY primitive the transmitting interface receives increments its buffer-to-buffer credit count by one.

    Both interfaces on an FC link track buffer-to-buffer credits. As long as buffer-to-buffer credits are available, the transmitter continues to send frames. If the number of buffer-to-buffer credits reaches zero (0), transmission stops until buffer-to-buffer credits are available, as indicated by the reception of an R_RDY primitive. Buffer-to-buffer credits can compensate for long cable distances to limit throughput and prevent buffer overflow.

    However, if frame corruption or errors transmitting R_RDY primitives occur, the buffer-to-buffer credit counters on the sending and receiving interfaces do not have the same values. This causes the permanent loss of buffer-to-buffer credits. When credits are lost, the buffer credit count can decrement to zero and indicate that there is no available buffer space even if buffer space is actually available. This can result in unnecessary link idle time.

    To recover lost buffer-to-buffer credits, you can configure a buffer-to-buffer credit state change number (BB_SC_N). BB_SC_N must be configured on both ends of the connection. If only one end of the connection is configured for BB_SC_N, the feature is disabled. The two directly connected FC interfaces communicate the BB_SC_N value during fabric login (FLOGI).

    When you enable BB_SC_N on the interfaces on both ends of an FC link, the interfaces exchange buffer-to-buffer state change send (BB_SCs) and buffer-to-buffer state change receive (BB_SCr) primitives to track the number of frames sent and the number of R_RDY primitives received. The state change number determines the number of frames and R_RDY primitives the interfaces exchange between consecutive BB_SCn primitives and between consecutive BB_SCr primitives. The state change primitives inform each interface of the other interface’s frame count and R_RDY count states.

    The state counters should match so that each interface knows and agrees with the other interface’s state. If the interface at either end of the link detects a discrepancy, it knows that a frame or an R_RDY primitive was corrupted or dropped.

    For example, if a receiving interface has sent two R_RDY primitives but the BB_SCr that the interface receives from the sending interface only counts one R_RDY primitive received, it reveals that one R_RDY primitive was not delivered successfully and that one buffer-to-buffer credit was lost. When one of the interfaces on the link detects a discrepancy, the interfaces can take corrective action and recover the lost buffer-to-buffer credits.

    Enabling the buffer-to-buffer credit recovery feature does not impact buffer resources and has an insignificant impact on processing resources.

    If buffer-to-buffer credit recovery is not used, then when there is no buffer credit on a port, a timeout and recovery mechanism prevents buffer overflow.

    FCoE VLAN Interface to FCoE Devices

    Each FC fabric configured on the gateway includes at least one FCoE VLAN interface to connect the FCoE devices on the FCoE VLAN to the FC switch. (Including the FCoE VLAN interface and the native FC interfaces in the FC fabric configuration connects them.) FCoE VLANs can include any Ethernet interface on the switch that is in tagged-access or trunk mode. The best practice is to configure Ethernet interfaces that belong to FCoE VLANs in tagged-access port mode.

    Note: The Ethernet interfaces that connect to FCoE devices must include a native VLAN to transport FIP traffic, because FIP VLAN discovery and notification frames are exchanged as untagged packets.

    FCoE VLANs should carry only FCoE traffic. You should not mix FCoE traffic and standard Ethernet traffic on the same VLAN.

    Note: FCoE VLANs (any VLAN that carries FCoE traffic) support only Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and link aggregation group (LAG) Layer 2 features.

    FCoE traffic cannot use a standard LAG because traffic might be hashed to different physical LAG links on different transmissions. This breaks the (virtual) point-to-point link that Fibre Channel traffic requires. If you configure a standard LAG interface for FCoE traffic, FCoE traffic might be rejected by the FC SAN.

    Beginning with Junos OS Release 13.2X52, QFabric systems support a special LAG called an FCoE LAG, which enables you to transport FCoE traffic and regular Ethernet traffic (traffic that is not FCoE traffic) across the same link aggregation bundle. An FCoE LAG ensures that FCoE traffic uses the same physical link in the LAG for requests and replies in order to preserve the virtual point-to-point link between the FCoE device converged network adapter (CNA) and the FC SAN switch across the QFabric system Node device. An FCoE LAG does not provide load balancing or link redundancy for FCoE traffic. However, regular Ethernet traffic uses the standard hashing algorithm and receives the usual LAG benefits of load balancing and link redundancy in an FCoE LAG.

    On FCoE-FC gateway untrusted FC fabrics, you must disable FIP snooping session scaling on the gateway, which decreases the number of supported sessions from 2,500 to 376 sessions. (Disable FIP snooping scaling by including the no-fip-snooping-scaling option in the [edit fc-options] hierarchy.) On FCoE trusted FC fabrics, the session limit is 2,500 sessions.

    Each FCoE VLAN interface can belong to only one FC fabric configured on the gateway. A gateway FC fabric can have more than one FCoE VLAN, but each FCoE VLAN in the FC fabric must belong only to that FC fabric. You can configure more than one FC fabric on a gateway; each FC fabric must use different FCoE VLAN interfaces to connect to FCoE devices.

    Note: Storm control must be disabled on all Ethernet interfaces that belong to the FCoE VLAN to prevent FCoE traffic from being dropped.

    Port Mode

    You must explicitly configure the FCoE VLAN interface in F_Port mode. All members of the FCoE VLAN use the FCoE VLAN interface as the connection to the gateway NP_Port interfaces and ultimately to the FC switch.

    All of the 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces that are members of an FCoE VLAN should be configured as tagged-access port mode interfaces. However, the system also supports configuring these interfaces in trunk port mode.

    Best Practice: Use tagged-access port mode for Ethernet interfaces that are connected to converged network adapters (CNAs) in FCoE access devices.

    Use trunk port mode when an Ethernet interface is an interswitch link (ISL)—that is, when the port is connected to another switch. For example, if a port is connected to a transit switch that is performing VN2VF_Port FIP snooping, configure the port in trunk mode and as an FCoE trusted port.

    The tagged-access port mode was not available in Junos OS Release 11.3 and earlier releases. In Release 11.3 and earlier, only trunk port mode was used for Ethernet interfaces that belong to an FCoE VLAN. Because tagged-access mode is now available, using trunk mode for interfaces connected to FCoE CNAs is not recommended.

    If an existing configuration uses trunk mode for ports connected to FCoE CNAs, you can change the port mode to tagged-access without disrupting traffic. Although we recommend changing the port mode of these ports from trunk mode to tagged-access mode as a best practice, it is not mandatory. New configurations should use tagged-access mode for interfaces that connect to FCoE devices.

    There are several advantages of configuring Ethernet ports connected to FCoE devices in tagged-access mode instead of in trunk mode:

    • It is standard practice to configure ISL ports as trunk ports.
    • It is standard practice not to configure ports that connect to servers as trunk ports.
    • When an interface goes down, if that interface is in trunk mode, then the FCoE sessions on that interface are terminated only after the gateway stops receiving FIP keepalive messages from the ENode and exceeds 2.5 times the FIP keepalive timeout advertisement value. If the interface is in tagged-access mode and the interface goes down, the gateway sends a FIP message to terminate the sessions on the interface.
    • Similarly, if an ENode session moves from one interface to another interface, if the original interface is in trunk mode, the session is not removed from the interface until the gateway stops receiving FIP keepalive messages and exceeds 2.5 times the FIP keepalive advertisement timeout value. But if the interface is in tagged-access mode, the gateway detects that the session is no longer on the interface, does not refresh the FIP keepalive timer, and thus ages out the session.

    Note: FIP is enabled on the FCoE VLAN, which is a Layer 3 interface. As with other Layer 3 interfaces under Junos OS, when the last member (10-Gigabit Ethernet interface) of the FCoE VLAN is deleted, the FCoE VLAN interface is internally marked as “down.” When the Layer 3 FCoE VLAN interface is marked as “down”, FIP stops running on it. When the last member interface is deleted from an FCoE VLAN and FIP stops running, the result could be an immediate timeout for the VN_Ports that were connected on that interface, regardless of whether the port mode is tagged-access or trunk.

    Disabling Storm Control on FCoE Interfaces

    Storm control is not supported on the FCoE interfaces of an FCoE-FC gateway VLAN. Enabling storm control on an FCoE-FC gateway VLAN interface may cause FCoE packet loss. Storm control is disabled by default on all interfaces. However, if you enabled storm control globally on all switch interfaces or on any interfaces that are part of the FCoE VLAN interface, you must disable storm control on the Ethernet interfaces of the FCoE VLAN.

    If storm control is enabled on only a few interfaces of the FCoE VLAN, you can disable storm control on individual interfaces by including the delete ethernet-switching-options storm-control interface interface-name statement in the configuration, where interface-name is the name of the interface on which you want to disable storm control.

    If storm control is enabled globally on the switch when the switch is acting as an FCoE-FC gateway, it is often easiest to disable storm control on all interfaces, then enable storm control only on Ethernet interfaces that are not part of the FCoE VLAN interface.

    If storm control is enabled globally, you can disable storm control in either of two ways:

    • Disable storm control on all interfaces, then enable storm control on the interfaces you want to use storm control. (From the default configuration, you cannot disable storm control on individual interfaces because the default configuration enables storm control on all interfaces, not on individual interfaces.)

      For example, if you want interfaces xe-0/0/20, xe-0/0/21, and xe-0/0/22 to use storm control, disable storm control on all interfaces, then enable storm control on those three interfaces:

      1. Disable storm control on all interfaces:
        user@switch# delete ethernet-switching-options storm-control interface all
      2. Enable storm control on interfaces xe-0/0/20, xe-0/0/21, and xe-0/0/22:
        user@switch# set ethernet-switching-options storm-control interface xe-0/0/20
        user@switch# set ethernet-switching-options storm-control interface xe-0/0/21
        user@switch# set ethernet-switching-options storm-control interface xe-0/0/22
    • Disable storm control for all unknown unicast traffic on all interfaces by including the following statement in your configuration:
      user@switch# set ethernet-switching-options storm-control interface all no-unknown-unicast

    NPIV Support

    The gateway supports FCoE device NPIV. For example, a single physical FCoE device can have multiple virtual machines running on it. Each virtual machine can instantiate a separate virtual connection to the gateway, which results in its own virtual link to the FC switch. In this way, an FCoE device can have multiple separate connections to the FC SAN on a single physical port.

    This is similar to the NPIV function the gateway performs with the FC switch to support multiple virtual FCoE device connections on one physical NP_Port.

    The gateway presents multiple VF_Port interfaces on each FCoE VLAN interface to support the requirement for unique, secure virtual links.

    VN2VF_Port FIP Snooping

    The FCoE-facing ports that belong to an FCoE VLAN on a gateway are enabled for VN2VF_Port FIP snooping automatically. You can disable VN2VF_Port FIP snooping on any individual interface by configuring it as a trusted interface.

    Assigning Interfaces to a Fibre Channel Fabric

    You assign at least one FCoE VLAN interface and at least one native FC interface to each FC fabric you configure on the gateway. All of the interfaces that belong to an FC fabric must reside on the same gateway device. Interfaces on different gateways cannot belong to the same FC fabric, because an FC fabric is local to a single gateway device.

    Deleting a Fibre Channel Interface

    To delete an FC interface or an FCoE VLAN interface, you must delete the interface from the fabric first and then delete the interface from the switch.

     

    Related Documentation

     

    Modified: 2016-04-29