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Understanding CoS Priority Group Scheduling

 

Priority group scheduling defines the class-of-service (CoS) properties of a group of output queues (priorities). Priority group scheduling works with output queue scheduling to create a two-tier hierarchical scheduler. The hierarchical scheduler allocates bandwidth to a group of queues (a priority group, called a forwarding class set in Junos OS configuration). Queue scheduling determines the portion of the priority group bandwidth that the particular queue can use.

You configure priority group scheduling in a traffic control profile and then associate the traffic control profile with a forwarding class set and an interface. You attach a scheduler map to the traffic control profile to specify the queue scheduling characteristics.

Note

When you configure bandwidth for a queue or a priority group, the switch considers only the data as the configured bandwidth. The switch does not account for the bandwidth consumed by the preamble and the interframe gap (IFG). Therefore, when you calculate and configure the bandwidth requirements for a queue or for a priority group, consider the preamble and the IFG as well as the data in the calculations.

Priority Group Scheduling Components

Table 1 provides a quick reference to the traffic control profile components you can configure to determine the bandwidth properties of priority groups, and Table 2 provides a quick reference to some related scheduling configuration components.

Table 1: Priority Group Scheduler Components

Traffic Control Profile Component

Description

Guaranteed rate

Sets the minimum guaranteed port bandwidth for the priority group. Extra port bandwidth is shared among priority groups in proportion to the guaranteed rate of each priority group on the port.

Shaping rate

Sets the maximum port bandwidth the priority group can consume.

Scheduler map

Maps schedulers to queues (forwarding classes, also called priorities). This determines the portion of the priority group bandwidth that a queue receives.

Table 2: Other Scheduling Components

Other Scheduling Components

Description

Forwarding class

Maps traffic to a queue (priority).

Forwarding class set

Name of a priority group. You map forwarding classes to priority groups. A forwarding class set consists of one or more forwarding classes.

Scheduler

Sets the bandwidth and scheduling priority of individual queues (forwarding classes).

Default Traffic Control Profile

There is no default traffic control profile.

Guaranteed Rate (Minimum Guaranteed Bandwidth)

The guaranteed rate determines the minimum guaranteed bandwidth for each priority group. It also determines how much excess (extra) port bandwidth the priority group can share; each priority group shares extra port bandwidth in proportion to its guaranteed rate. You specify the rate in bits per second as a fixed value such as 3 Mbps or as a percentage of the total port bandwidth.

The minimum transmission bandwidth can exceed the configured rate if additional bandwidth is available from other priority groups on the port. In case of congestion, the configured guaranteed rate is guaranteed for the priority group. This property enables you to ensure that each priority group receives the amount of bandwidth appropriate to its level of service.

Note

Configuring the minimum guaranteed bandwidth (transmit rate) for a forwarding class does not work unless you also configure the minimum guaranteed bandwidth (guaranteed rate) for the forwarding class set in the traffic control profile.

Additionally, the sum of the transmit rates of the queues in a forwarding class set should not exceed the guaranteed rate for the forwarding class set. (You cannot guarantee a minimum bandwidth for the queues that is greater than the minimum bandwidth guaranteed for the entire set of queues.)

You cannot configure a guaranteed rate for forwarding class sets that include strict-high priority queues.

Sharing Extra Bandwidth

Extra bandwidth is available to priority groups when the priority groups do not use the full amount of available port bandwidth. This extra port bandwidth is shared among the priority groups based on the minimum guaranteed bandwidth of each priority group.

For example, Port A has three priority groups: fc-set-1, fc-set-2, and fc-set-3. Fc-set-1 has a guaranteed rate of 2 Gbps, fc-set-2 has a guaranteed rate of 2 Gbps, and fc-set-3 has a guaranteed rate of 4 Gbps. After servicing the minimum guaranteed bandwidth of these priority groups, the port has an extra 2 Gbps of available bandwidth, and all three priority groups have still have packets to forward. The priority groups receive the extra bandwidth in proportion to their guaranteed rates, so fc-set-1 receives an extra 500 Mbps, fc-set-2 receives an extra 500 Mbps, and fc-set-3 receives an extra 1 Gbps.

Shaping Rate (Maximum Bandwidth)

The shaping rate determines the maximum bandwidth the priority group can consume. You specify the rate in bits per second as a fixed value such as 5 Mbps or as a percentage of the total port bandwidth.

The maximum bandwidth for a priority group depends on the total bandwidth available on the port and how much bandwidth the other priority groups on the port consume.

Scheduler Maps

A scheduler map maps schedulers to queues. When you associate a scheduler map with a traffic control profile, then associate the traffic control profile with an interface and a forwarding class set, the scheduling defined by the scheduler map determines the portion of the priority group resources that each individual queue can use.

You can associate up to four user-defined scheduler maps with traffic control profiles.