Understanding BFD for BGP

 

The Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) protocol is a simple hello mechanism that detects failures in a network. Hello packets are sent at a specified, regular interval. A neighbor failure is detected when the routing device stops receiving a reply after a specified interval. BFD works with a wide variety of network environments and topologies. The failure detection timers for BFD have shorter time limits than default failure detection mechanisms for BGP, so they provide faster detection.

Note

Configuring both BFD and graceful restart for BGP on the same device is counterproductive. When an interface goes down, BFD detects this instantly, stops traffic forwarding and the BGP session goes down whereas graceful restart forwards traffic despite the interface failure, this behavior might cause network issues. Hence we do not recommend configuring both BFD and graceful restart on the same device.

The BFD failure detection timers can be adjusted to be faster or slower. The lower the BFD failure detection timer value, the faster the failure detection and vice versa. For example, the timers can adapt to a higher value if the adjacency fails (that is, the timer detects failures more slowly). Or a neighbor can negotiate a higher value for a timer than the configured value. The timers adapt to a higher value when a BFD session flap occurs more than three times in a span of 15 seconds (15000 milliseconds). A back-off algorithm increases the receive (Rx) interval by two if the local BFD instance is the reason for the session flap. The transmission (Tx) interval is increased by two if the remote BFD instance is the reason for the session flap. You can use the clear bfd adaptation command to return BFD interval timers to their configured values. The clear bfd adaptation command is hitless, meaning that the command does not affect traffic flow on the routing device.

Note

On all SRX Series devices, high CPU utilization triggered for reasons such as CPU intensive commands and SNMP walks causes the BFD protocol to flap while processing large BGP updates. (Platform support depends on the Junos OS release in your installation.)

Starting with Junos OS Release 15.1X49-D100, SRX340, SRX345, and SRX1500 devices support dedicated BFD.

Starting with Junos OS Release 15.1X49-D100, SRX300 and SRX320 devices support real-time BFD.

Starting with Junos OS Release 15.1X49-D110, SRX550M devices support dedicated BFD.

In Junos OS Release 8.3 and later, BFD is supported on internal BGP (IBGP) and multihop external BGP (EBGP) sessions as well as on single-hop EBGP sessions. In Junos OS Release 9.1 through Junos OS Release 11.1, BFD supports IPv6 interfaces in static routes only. In Junos OS Release 11.2 and later, BFD supports IPv6 interfaces with BGP.

Release History Table
Release
Description
Starting with Junos OS Release 15.1X49-D100, SRX340, SRX345, and SRX1500 devices support dedicated BFD.
Starting with Junos OS Release 15.1X49-D100, SRX300 and SRX320 devices support real-time BFD.
In Junos OS Release 11.2 and later, BFD supports IPv6 interfaces with BGP.
In Junos OS Release 9.1 through Junos OS Release 11.1, BFD supports IPv6 interfaces in static routes only.
In Junos OS Release 8.3 and later, BFD is supported on internal BGP (IBGP) and multihop external BGP (EBGP) sessions as well as on single-hop EBGP sessions.