Help us improve your experience.

Let us know what you think.

Do you have time for a two-minute survey?

What’s New

 

Learn about new and changed features introduced for Junos OS Evolved Release 19.2R1.

Class of Service

  • Layer 3 COS support extended for Junos OS 19.2R1 (QFX5220-32CD, QFX5220-128C)—Starting in Junos OS Release 19.2R1, Layer 3 COS support has been extended to the QFX5000 Series of switches. Both IPv4 and IPv6 unicast routing are supported. Other COS features supported include FC to queue mapping, BA classifier - DSCP, fixed classifier and MF classifier, rewrite – DSCP, scheduling, WRED, ECN, and shared buffer.

    [See Understanding Class of Service.]

General Routing

  • Support for IRB (QFX5220-32CD, QFX5220-128C)—Starting in Junos OS Evolved Release 19.2R1, the QFX5220-128C switch supports basic integrated routing and bridging (IRB) functionality. However, the following features are not supported in this release:

    • VPLS

    • VXLAN or EVPN

    • Tunnel interfaces as Layer 2 interfaces

    • Pseudo-interfaces other than aggregated Ethernet interfaces as Layer 2 logical interfaces

    • Management VLAN functionality

    • IRB on private VLAN and IRB over MPLS-based core

  • Layer 3 Unicast Forwarding Protocols support (QFX5000)—Starting with Junos OS Evolved Release 19.2R1, the Layer 3 unicast forwarding protocol VRF lite is supported.

Hardware

  • QFX5220-128C switch—As of Junos OS Evolved 19.2R1, the QFX5220 line of switches adds the QFX5220-128C. The new switch offers 128 ports of 100 Gigabit Ethernet in a 4 U form factor. With 12.8 terabits per second (Tbps) bandwidth, the QFX5220-128C is optimally designed as data aggregation or top of rack switch in small to medium size data centers and MSDC (Massively Scalable Data Center) deployments. The 100 Gigabit Ethernet ports can be configured either for 100 Gbps or 40 Gbps speeds. The 100 Gbps ports can also be channelized into 4 x 25 Gbps, or 4 x 10 Gbps. There are two dedicated small form factor plus (SFP+) for 10 Gigabit or 1 Gigabit Ethernet support.

    An Intel Xeon D-1500 processor drives the QFX5220 control plane, which runs the Junos OS Evolved software. The Junos OS Evolved software image is stored on two internal 50 GB solid-state drives (SSDs). The QFX5220-128C is available with ports-to-FRUs airflow, (airflow out), and with AC or DC power supplies.

    [See QFX5220 System Overview.]

Interfaces and Chassis

  • Support for Layer 2 bridging (QFX5220)—Starting with Junos OS Evolved Release 19.2R1, QFX5220 switches support Layer 2 bridging. You create a bridge domain by adding a set of Layer 2 logical interfaces (on your QFX5220 switch) to represent a broadcast domain. All the member ports of the bridge domain participate in Layer 2 learning and forwarding. You can configure one or more bridge domains to perform Layer 2 bridging. You can optionally disable learning on a bridge domain. You can configure the layer 2 interfaces only by configuring the access and trunk port of ethernet-switching family.

    [See Configuring Layer 2 Bridging Interfaces.]

  • Support for QFX5220-128C—Starting in 19.2R1, Junos OS Evolved Release supports QFX5220-128C, a fixed configuration switch that provides a maximum bandwidth of 12.8 Tbps. The QFX5220-128C switch, which comes in a 4 RU form factor, provides 128 QSFP28 user ports (128 ports of 100 Gigabit Ethernet or 64 ports of 40 Gigabit Ethernet). In this release, the QSFP28 ports support a speed configurations of 25 Gbps (4x25 Gbps). The QFX5220-128C supports features such as chassis management, power management, environment monitoring, and error handling and alarms.

    [See QFX5220 System Overview]

  • Support for Layer 2 ALD (QFX5220-32CD, QFX5220-128C)—Starting with Junos OS Evolved Release 19.2R1, the QFX5220-128C switch supports layer 2 address learning process (ALD) including integrated routing and bridging (IRB) functionality.

  • Layer 2 forwarding support (QFX5220)—Starting in Junos OS Evolved Release 19.2R1, there is support for Layer 2 forwarding and changes for Layer 2 protocols specific to the Packet Forwarding Engine.

Layer 2 Protocols

  • Layer 2 Protocols (QFX5220 switch)—You can configure the following Layer 2 protocols:

    • Class of Service

    • Integrated Routing and Bridging

    • MAC address filtering, MAC address aging, and static MAC address assignment for interfaces

    • Static and dynamic link aggregation with Link Aggregation Control Protocol (fast and slow)

    • Link Layer Discovery Protocol

    [See Ethernet Switching User Guide.]

MPLS

  • Support for MPLS (QFX5220-32CD, QFX5220-128C)—Starting in Junos OS Evolved Release 19.2R1, the QFX5220 switch supports all MPLS features that enable IP data center networks to interconnect over an IP fabric cloud.

    The supported MPLS features include:

    • LDP and RSVP

    • Layer 3 VPN (IPv4 and IPv6)

    • Penultimate hop popping

    • MPLS with equal-cost multipath

    • MPLS over link aggregation group (LAG)

    • Static and dynamic LSP

    • 6VPE (IPv6 over MPLS)

    However, the following MPLS features are not supported in this release:

    • Ethernet VPN (EVPN) MPLS

    • Layer 2 VPN

    • MPLS class of service (CoS)

    • MPLS firewalls

    • Point-to-multipoint LSP

    • Source Packet Routing in Networking (SPRING) or Segment routing MPLS

    [See MPLS Applications User Guide.]

Network Management and Monitoring

  • Read Junos OS network information using Linux tools (QFX5220)—On devices running Junos OS Evolved, preload the intercept library libnli.so in order to obtain network information in the same format as the output you get on a device running Junos OS. The one difference is the name of the logical interface. Junos interface names must be translated into a different form, which is accomplished by a translation rule.

    [See Running Linux Tools on Junos OS Evolved.]

  • Mirroring support (QFX5220)—Mirroring is supported on Layer 2 and Layer 3 interfaces.

Routing Protocols

Routing Policy and Firewall Filters

  • Firewall filter support on Layer 2 interfaces (QFX5220-32CD)—You can now configure a firewall filter on the switch and apply it to a port or VLAN. Firewall filters provide rules that define whether to accept or discard packets that are transiting an interface. To configure the filter, specify the family address type ethernet-switching. Then specify the match conditions and actions to take on a packet that matches the term. You configure firewall filters at the [edit firewall] hierarchy level. This feature was previously supported in an "X" release of Junos OS.

    [See Firewall Filter Match Conditions and Actions (QFX5220).]

  • Firewall filter support on Layer 2 and Layer 3 interfaces (QFX5220-128C)—You can now configure a firewall filter and apply it to a Layer 2 port or VLAN , or a Layer 3 IPv4 or IPv6 interface. Firewall filters provide rules that define whether to accept or discard packets that are transiting an interface. To configure the filter, specify the family address ethernet-switching for a Layer 2 interface or inet orinet6 for a Layer 3 interface. Then specify the match conditions and actions to take on a packet that matches the term. You configure firewall filters at the [edit firewall] hierarchy level. This feature was previously supported in an "X" release of Junos OS.

    [See Firewall Filter Match Conditions and Actions (QFX5220).]

Services Applications

  • GRE features supported (QFX5220)—You can configure the following Layer 2 protocols:

    • GRE tunnels over GigE, LAG, and VLAN

    • Tagged subinterfaces

    • Payload protocol for IPv4 and IPv6

    • Delivery protocol for IPv4

    • Multicast over GRE tunnels

    • Tunnel statistics

    • VRF with GRE

    • Time-to-live

    • IPv4 as GRE delivery header

    • IPv4 and IPv6 over GRE

    • ISO over GRE

    • Traffic class configuration

    • Copying TOS to outer-IP for Routing Engine traffic

Software Installation and Upgrade

  • Component-level upgrade available (QFX5220)—The upgrade command provides for restarting applications and nodes in an optimal manner. You use one upgrade command, request system software add, and by default, the upgrade process identifies upgrades only those components that differ in the target release. An option to the upgrade command allows you to perform the equivalent of a cold boot upgrade should it be required. Output specifies whether the software is upgraded using cold boot or by application restart.

    [See request system software add.]

  • Zero touch provisioning (ZTP) support (QFX5220-128C)—ZTP can dramatically reduce the time to provision the network in a data center and decrease the opportunity for introduction of human error into the network. The image and configuration files are placed centrally in a network server. The device is shipped with factory default configuration along with ZTP configuration. Upon booting up, the device downloads the image from the central location, upgrades itself and, upon rebooting, applies the configuration which it fetched from the network server.

    [See Zero Touch Provisioning.]