New and Changed Features

 

This section describes the new features and enhancements to existing features in Junos OS Release 18.2R1 for the PTX Series.

Hardware

  • Next-generation fixed configuration packet transport router (PTX Series)— Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, the new PTX10002-60C features a compact, 2 U form factor that is easy to deploy in space-constrained Internet exchange locations, remote central offices, and embedded peering points throughout the network, including cloud-hosted services. The PTX10002-60C has 60 QSFP28 transceiver ports that you can configure as 100 Gbps, 40 Gbps, or 4 by 10 Gbps. The ports handle up to 6 Tbps of throughput and 4 Bpps of forwarding capacity. The PTX10002-60C is available with either AC or DC power supplies, and it has airflow out, where air comes into the vents in the port panel and exhausts through the field-replaceable unit (FRU) panel.

  • PTX10K-LC1105 MACsec line card on PTX10008 and PTX10016 routers—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, PTX10K-LC1105 line card provides 30 ports of either 100-gigabit or 40-gigabit QSFP28 with MACsec features.

    [See PTX10000 Line Card Components and Descriptions.]

Class of Service (CoS)

  • Support for class of service (CoS) on PTX10002-60C routers—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, PTX10002-60C routers support CoS.

    CoS is the assignment of traffic flows to different service levels. Service providers can use router-based CoS features to define service levels that provide different delay, jitter (delay variation), and packet loss characteristics to particular applications served by specific traffic flows.

    [See Understanding CoS CLI Configuration Statements on PTX Series Routers.]

High Availability (HA) and Resiliency

  • Resiliency Support for PTX10008 and PTX10016 routers with JNP10K-RE1—Starting with Junos OS Release 18.2R1, resiliency support is enabled for PTX10008 and PTX10016 routers with the JNP10K-RE1 Routing and Control Boards.

Interfaces and Chassis

  • Support for PTX10K-LC1105 line card (PTX10008)—Starting with Junos OS Release 18.2R1, PTX10008 routers support the PTX10K-LC1105 line card. The line card is designed to provide secure Ethernet communication across high-speed links. The card consists of 30 QSFP+ or QSFP28 Pluggable ports that are Media Access Control Security (MACsec) capable. The ports support speeds of 100 Gbps or 40 Gbps, which can be configured using the CLI.

  • Protection against distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks (PTX10002-60C)—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, PTX10002-60C devices support DDoS protection for many Layer 2 and Layer 3 protocol families and packet types. DDoS attacks typically use network control packets to trigger a large number of exceptions in the network, consuming resources and crippling network operations. DDoS protection uses firewall filters and policers available in Junos OS to discard or rate-limit control plane traffic so that malicious traffic does not overwhelm and bring down a device. To configure DDoS protection, use the ddos-protection statement at the [edit system] hierarchy level to specify the desired protocol groups, control packet types, and filter parameters.

    [See Understanding Distributed Denial-of-Service Protection on PTX Series and QFX Series Devices.]

  • Channelization support (PTX Series Routers)—Starting with Junos OS Release 18.2R1, you can use channelization functionality to subdivide a larger flexible optical interface into sub interfaces or channels. The router has 12 ASIC circuits (PE) as a part of a Packet Forwarding Engine, and each PE switch has 5 ports (one standalone MAC port and 4 channelized MAC ports). The standalone MAC ports cannot be channelized. On the router, you can channelize 48 ports out of available 60 ports.

    By default, the ports come up in a mode that does not support channelization. If you channelize a port in a PE switch for the first time, it would result in FPC reboot. But if you channelize another port in the same PE switch, the FPC will not be rebooted. If you channelize a port in a different PE switch, the FPC will be rebooted.

    To enable channelization on an interface:

    [See Channelizing Interfaces.]

Junos Telemetry Interface

  • Streaming OpenConfig data from Routing Engine sensors over UDP in protobuf format (MX Series, PTX Series, QFX Series)–Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, you can stream OpenConfig-based sensor data from Routing Engine sensors using the Junos Telemetry Interface (JTI). This allows you to stream the OpenConfig sensor data in gRPC/protobuf format rather than in key/value pairs. This makes the messages smaller and is more efficient.

    [See Overview of the Junos Telemetry Interface.]

  • Routing Engine state sensors for the Junos Telemetry Interface (MX Series, PTX Series)—Starting with Junos OS Release 18.2R1, you can export statistics for the Routing Engine state through the Junos Telemetry Interface using the following resource paths:

    • /junos/kernel-ifstate/stats/churn-rate

    • /junos/kernel-ifstate/stats/peer-consumption-rate

    • /junos/kernel-ifstate/stats/vetos-statistics

    Only gRPC streaming is supported.

    To provision the sensor to export data through gRPC, use the telemetrySubscribe RPC to specify telemetry parameters. Streaming telemetry data through gRPC also requires you to download the OpenConfig for Junos OS module.

    Support for the Junos Telemetry Interface was introduced on QFX10000 and QFX5200 switches in Junos OS Release 17.2R1.

    [See Guidelines for gRPC Sensors (Junos Telemetry Interface).]

  • Expanded ON_CHANGE support for Junos Telemetry Interface (JTI) (MX Series, PTX Series)—Starting with Junos OS Release 18.2R1, OpenConfig support through remote procedure call (RPC) and JTI is extended to support additional ON_CHANGE sensors.

    Periodical streaming of OpenConfig operational states and counters collects information at regular intervals. ON_CHANGE support streams operational states as events (only when there is a change), and is preferred over periodic streaming for time-sensitive missions.

    These paths, previously supporting periodical streaming only, now also support ON_CHANGE streaming:

    • /interfaces/interface/state/admin-status

    • /interfaces/interface/state/description

    • /interfaces/interface/state/oper-status

    • /interfaces/interface/subinterfaces/subinterface/state/admin-status

    • /interfaces/interface/subinterfaces/subinterface/state/description

    • /interfaces/interface/subinterfaces/subinterface/state/oper-status

    • /interfaces/interface/subinterfaces/subinterface/state/ifIndex

    • /interfaces/interface/subinterfaces/subinterface/state/index

    • /interfaces/interface/subinterfaces/subinterface/state/name

    These resource paths from the preceding list do not change with an event, but will be streamed on creation and deletion:

    • /interfaces/interface/subinterfaces/subinterface/state/ifIndex

    • /interfaces/interface/subinterfaces/subinterface/state/index

    • /interfaces/interface/subinterfaces/subinterface/state/name

    To provision a sensor to export data through gRPC, use the telemetrySubscribe RPC to specify telemetry parameters. Streaming telemetry data through gRPC also requires you to download the OpenConfig for Junos OS module.

    To enable ON_CHANGE support, configure the sample frequency in the subscription as zero. When you create a subscription using a top-level container as the resource path (for example, /interface), leaf devices under the resource path /interface with ON_CHANGE support are automatically streamed based on events. Other leaf devices will not be streamed.

    Before events are streamed, there is an initial stream of states to the collector, followed by an END_OF_INITIAL_SYNC. This notice signals the start of event streaming.

    [See Understanding OpenConfig and gRPC on Junos Telemetry Interface and Guidelines for gRPC Sensors (Junos Telemetry Interface).]

  • J-Insight Device Monitor (PTX Series)–J-Insight is a data-driven device monitoring solution that provides visibility and insight into the health of a running system. Starting with Junos OS Release 18.2R1, the J-Insight framework facilitates real-time monitoring of system resources for FPC FRUs. It also has been integrated with the existing connectivity error management infrastructure to normalize error detection, monitoring, and reporting. J-Insight is an on-premise system application that uses the Junos Telemetry Interface to continuously collect data that is reflective of the current state and health of the device component being monitored.

    [See J-Insight Device Monitor Overview.]

Layer 3 Features

  • Support for Layer 3 unicast features on PTX10002-60C—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, PTX10002-60C routers support the following Layer 3 features for unicast IPv4 and IPv6 traffic:

    • OSPF

    • IS-IS

    • BGP

MPLS

  • LDP support (PTX10002-60C)—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, LDP support is provided for the PTX10002-60C router. The Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) is a protocol for distributing labels in non-traffic-engineered applications. LDP enables routers to establish label-switched paths (LSPs) through a network by mapping network-layer routing information directly to data link layer-switched paths. For more information, see the MPLS Applications Feature Guide for Routing Devices.

    RSVP support (PTX10002-60C)—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, RSVP support is provided for the PTX10002-60C router. RSVP is a resource reservation setup protocol that is used by both network hosts and routers. Hosts use RSVP to request a specific class of service (CoS) from the network for particular application flows. Routers use RSVP to deliver CoS requests to all routers along the datapath. RSVP can also maintain and refresh states for a requested CoS application flow. For more information, see the MPLS Applications Feature Guide for Routing Devices.

    MPLS capabilities (PTX10002-60C)—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, MPLS capabilities are available on the PTX10002-60C router. MPLS provides both label edge router (LER) and label-switching router LSR and provides the following capabilities:

    • Object access method, including ping, traceroute, and Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD)

    • Fast reroute (FRR), a component of MPLS local protection

      Both one-to-one local protection and many-to-one local protection are supported.

    • Loop-free alternate FRR

    • 6PE and 6VPE devices

    • Layer 3 VPNs for both IPv4 and IPv6

    • L2CKT

    Support for IS-IS segment routing on PTX10002-60C—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, IS-IS segment routing support is enabled through MPLS. Currently, label advertisements are supported for IS-IS only. IS-IS creates an adjacency segment per adjacency, per level, and per address family (one each for IPv4 and IPv6). Junos OS IS-IS implementation allocates node segment label blocks in accordance with the IS-IS protocol extensions for supporting segment routing node segments and provides a mechanism to the network operator to provision an IPv4 or IPv6 address family node segment index. To configure segment routing, use the following configuration statements at the [edit protocols isis] hierarchy level:

    • source-packet-routing—Enable the source packet routing feature.

    • node-segment—Enable source packet routing at all levels.

    • use-source-packet-routing—Enable use of source packet routing node segment labels for computing backup paths for normal IPv4 or IPv6 IS-IS prefixes and primary IS-IS source packet routing node segments.

    • no-advertise-adjacency-segment—Disable advertising of the adjacency segment on all levels for a specific interface.

    Egress peer engineering of service labels (such as BGP and MPLS) and egress peer protection for BGP-LU (PTX10002-60C)—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, you can enable traffic engineering of service traffic, such as MPLS LSP traffic between autonomous systems (ASs), by using BGP-labeled unicast for optimum utilization of the advertised egress routes. You can specify one or more backup devices for the primary egress AS boundary router. Junos OS installs the backup path in addition to the primary path in the MPLS forwarding table, which enables MPLS fast reroute (FRR) when the primary link fails. It provides support for the FRR protection backup scheme to perform an IP lookup to determine a new egress interface.

    [See Configuring Egress Peer Traffic Engineering by Using BGP Labeled Unicast and Enabling MPLS Fast Reroute.]

    IPv6 tunneling over an MPLS-based IPv4 network (PTX10002-60C)—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, tunneling enables you to connect IPv6 sites over an IPv4 MPLS-enabled backbone. IPv6 packets are carried over an IPv4 MPLS tunnel. To enable this service, you need to deploy provider edge (PE) routers that can run IPv4, MPLS, and BGP toward the core and IPv6 toward the edge.

    [ See Example: Tunneling IPv6 Traffic over MPLS IPv4 Networks.]

    MPLS inter-AS link protection (PTX10002-60C)—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, MPLS inter-AS link protection is supported. Link protection is essential in an MPLS network to ensure traffic restoration in case of an interface failure. The ingress router will then choose an alternate link through another interface to send traffic to its destination.

    For an MPLS inter-AS environment, link protection can be enabled when labeled-unicast is used to send traffic between autonomous systems (ASs). To configure link protection on an interface, the protection statement is introduced at the [edit protocols bgp group group-name family inet labeled-unicast] hierarchy level.

Multicast

  • Support for multicast protocols (PTX10002-60C) routers—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, PTX10002-60C routers support the following multicast protocols:

    • Protocol Independent Multicast sparse mode— PIM sparse mode enables efficient routing to multicast groups with receivers sparsely spread over multiple networks. To configure PIM sparse mode, include the pim statement at the [edit protocols] hierarchy level. PIM sparse mode supports static RP addresses, bootstrap routers, automatic RP announcement and discovery, and anycast RP functionality.

      [See Understanding PIM Sparse Mode.]

    • PIM source-specific multicast (PIM SSM)— PIM source-specific multicast uses a subset of PIM sparse mode and IGMPv3 to enable a client to receive multicast traffic directly from the source. PIM source-specific multicast uses the PIM sparse-mode functionality to create a shortest-path tree (SPT) between the client and the source, but builds the SPT without the help of a rendezvous point.

      [See Understanding PIM Source-Specific Mode.]

    • Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP)—IGMP manages the membership of hosts and routing devices in multicast groups.

Network Management and Monitoring

  • sFlow functionality introduced on the PTX1000 and PTX10000 platforms—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, the PTX1000 and PTX10000 routers support sFlow, a network monitoring protocol for high-speed networks. With sFlow, you can continuously monitor tens of thousands of ports simultaneously. The mechanism used by sFlow is simple, not resource intensive, and accurate. An sFlow agent embedded in a network device samples packets and gathers interface statistics and sends the information to a monitoring station called a collector for analysis. An sFlow agent can be implemented in a distributed model. In such a case, each subagent has a separate subagent ID and is responsible for monitoring a set of network ports. The subagents share a common agent address.

    [See Configuring sFlow Technology for Network Monitoring (CLI Procedure) and sflow.]

  • Support for Junos Space Service Now (PTX10008 and PTX10016)—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, PTX10008, and PTX10016 routers support Junos Space Service Now. Junos Space Service Now is an application that runs on the Junos Space Network Management Platform to automate fault management and accelerate issue resolution.

    [See Junos Space Service Now.]

  • Support for port mirroring on PTX10002-60C routers—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, PTX10002-60C routers supports port mirroring. Port mirroring copies packets entering or exiting a port and sends the copies to a local interface for local monitoring. You can use port mirroring to send traffic to applications that analyze traffic for purposes such as monitoring compliance, enforcing policies, detecting intrusions, monitoring and predicting traffic patterns, correlating events, and so on.

    [See Configuring Port Mirroring.]

Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM)

  • Connectivity fault management (CFM) support (PTX Series)—Starting with Junos OS Release 18.2R1, PTX5000 routers with FPC-P2 support Ethernet OAM CFM on the child links of tagged aggregated Ethernet bundles for IPv4 traffic, thereby enabling you to monitor faults on those child links.

    The CFM supports fault monitoring and path discovery functionalities.

    Note

    To enable CFM on an Ethernet interface, you must configure maintenance domains, maintenance associations, and maintenance association end points (MEPs).

    [See IEEE 802.1ag OAM Connectivity Fault Management Overview .]

Routing Policy and Firewall Filters

  • Support for firewall filters and policers on PTX10002-60C routers—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, you can define firewall filters on the PTX10002-60C routers that define whether to accept or discard packets. The PTX10002-60C routers support IPv4 filters, IPv6 filters, and MPLS filters.

    You can also use policing to apply limits to traffic flow and specify the action to be taken for packets that exceed those limits.

    [See Firewall Filters Overview.]

Services Applications

  • Support for multiple flow collectors for inline flow monitoring (PTX Series)—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, you can export flow records generated by inline flow monitoring to four collectors under a family with the same source IP address. The Packet Forwarding Engine can export the flow record, flow record template, option data, and, option data template packet to all configured collectors. You can configure the multiple collectors at the [edit forwarding-options sampling instance instance name] hierarchy level.

    [See Monitoring Network Traffic Flow Using Inline Flow Monitoring on PTX Series Routers.]

  • Support for inline flow monitoring (PTX10008 and PTX10016)—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, Junos OS supports inline active flow monitoring. Inline active flow monitoring supports version 9 and IPFIX flow collection templates. Version 9 template is supported for IPv4, IPv6, and MPLS. IPFIX template is supported for IPv4, IPv6, and MPLS. Both IPFIX and version 9 templates use UDP as the transport protocol.

    [SeeMonitoring Network Traffic Flow Using Inline Flow Monitoring on PTX Series Routers.]

  • Support for MPLS, MPLS-IPv4, and MPLS-IPv6 inline active flow monitoring (PTX Series)—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1 on PTX Series routers, you can perform inline flow monitoring for MPLS, MPLS-IPv4, and MPLS-IPv6 traffic. Both IPFIX and version 9 templates are supported. Inline flow monitoring for MPLS-over-UDP flows was supported in Junos OS Release 18.1R1.

    [See Configuring Inline Active Flow Monitoring on PTX Series Routers.]

Software Installation and Upgrade

  • Zero Touch Provisioning (PTX3000, PTX5000, PTX10008, PTX10016)—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, Zero Touch Provisioning (ZTP) is supported to automate the provisioning of the device configuration and software image with minimal manual intervention.

    When you physically connect a router to the network and boot it with a factory configuration, the router attempts to upgrade the Junos OS software image automatically and autoinstall a configuration file from the network through the management interface on PTX5000, PTX3000, PTX10008, and PTX10016 routers. The router uses information configured on a DHCP server to locate the necessary software image and configuration files on the network. If you have not configured the DHCP server to provide this information, the router boots with the pre installed software and factory-default configuration. The ZTP process either upgrades or downgrades the Junos OS version.

    [See Understanding Zero Touch Provisioning and Configuring Zero Touch Provisioning.]

  • ZTP support (PTX10002-60C switch)—Starting with Junos OS Release 18.1R1, ZTP, automates the provisioning of the device configuration and software image with minimal manual intervention, and is supported on PTX10002-60C VM hosts. When you physically connect a supported device to the network and boot it with a factory configuration, the device attempts to upgrade the Junos OS software image automatically and autoinstall a configuration provided on the DHCP server.

    [See Zero Touch Provisioning.]

System Management

  • Support for request vmhost and show vmhost commands (PTX10002-60C switches)—Starting in Junos OS Release 18.2R1, many of the request system and show system commands have been replaced with request vmhost and show vmhost commands.

    Here is a list of the vmhost commands that are now supported:

    • request vmhost cleanup

    • request vmhost file-copy

    • request vmhost halt

    • request vmhost hard-disk-test

    • request vmhost power-off

    • request vmhost power-on

    • request vmhost reboot

    • request vmhost snapshot

    • request vmhost software add

    • request vmhost software rollback

    • request vmhost zeroize

    • show vmhost bridge

    • show vmhost crash

    • show vmhost hard-disk-test

    • show vmhost hardware

    • show vmhost information

    • show vmhost logs

    • show vmhost management-if

    • show vmhost netstat

    • show vmhost processes

    • show vmhost resource-usage

    • show vmhost snapshot

    • show vmhost status

    • show vmhost uptime

    • show vmhost version

    [See VM Host Operations and Management for more information.]