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Junos Node Slicing Overview

Junos Node Slicing enables service providers and large enterprises to create a network infrastructure that consolidates multiple routing functions into a single physical device. It helps leverage the benefits of virtualization without compromising on performance. In particular, Junos Node Slicing enables the convergence of multiple services on a single physical infrastructure while avoiding the operational complexity involved. It provides operational, functional, and administrative separation of functions on a single physical infrastructure that enables the network to implement the same virtualization principles the compute industry has been using for years.

Using Junos Node Slicing, you can create multiple partitions in a single physical MX Series router. These partitions are referred to as guest network functions (GNFs). Each GNF behaves as an independent router, with its own dedicated control plane, data plane, and management plane. This enables you to run multiple services on a single converged MX Series router, while still maintaining operational isolation between them. You can leverage the same physical device to create parallel partitions that do not share the control plane or the forwarding plane, but only share the same chassis, space, and power.

You can also send traffic between GNFs through the switch fabric by using an Abstracted Fabric (AF) interface, a pseudo interface that behaves as a first class Ethernet interface. An AF interface facilitates routing control, data and management traffic between GNFs.

Junos Node Slicing supports multi-version software compatibility, thereby allowing the GNFs to be independently upgraded.

Benefits of Junos Node Slicing

  • Converged network—With Junos Node Slicing, service providers can consolidate multiple network services, such as video edge and voice edge, into a single physical router, while still maintaining operational separation between them. You can achieve both horizontal and vertical convergence. Horizontal convergence consolidates router functions of the same layer to a single router, while vertical convergence collapses router functions of different layers into a single router.

  • Improved scalability—Focusing on virtual routing partitions, instead of physical devices, improves the programmability and scalability of the network, enabling service providers and enterprises to respond to infrastructure requirements without having to buy additional hardware.

  • Easy risk management—Though multiple network functions converge on a single chassis, all the functions run independently, benefiting from operational, functional, and administrative separation. Partitioning a physical system, such as Broadband Network Gateway (BNG), into multiple independent logical instances ensures that failures are isolated. The partitions do not share the control plane or the forwarding plane, but only share the same chassis, space, and power. This means failure in one partition does not cause any widespread service outage.

  • Reduced network costs—Junos Node Slicing enables interconnection of GNFs through internal switching fabrics, which leverages Abstracted Fabric (AF) interface, a pseudo interface that represents a first class Ethernet interface behavior. With AF interface in place, companies no longer need to depend on physical interfaces to connect GNFs, resulting in significant savings.

  • Reduced time-to-market for new services and capabilities—Each GNF can operate on a different Junos software version. This advantage enables companies to evolve each GNF at its own pace. If a new service or a feature needs to be deployed on a certain GNF, and it requires a new software release, only the GNF involved requires an update. Additionally, with the increased agility, Junos Node Slicing enables service providers and enterprises to introduce highly flexible Everything-as-a-service business model to rapidly respond to ever-changing market conditions.

Modified: 2018-05-28