Help Center User GuideGetting Started
 
X
User Guide
Getting Started
Contents  

MPLS

Monitoring MPLS Interfaces

Purpose

View the interfaces on which MPLS is configured, including operational state and any administrative groups applied to an interface.

Action

Select Monitor>MPLS>Interfaces in the J-Web user interface, or enter the show mpls interface command.

Table 99 summarizes key output fields in the MPLS interface information display.

Table 99: Summary of Key MPLS Interface Information Output Fields

Field

Values

Additional Information

Interface

Name of the interface on which MPLS is configured.

State

State of the specified interface: Up or Dn (down).

Administrative groups

Administratively assigned colors of the MPLS link configured on the interface.

See Also

Monitoring MPLS LSP Information

Purpose

View all label-switched paths (LSPs) configured on the services router, including all inbound (ingress), outbound (egress), and transit LSP information.

Action

Select Monitor>MPLS>LSP Information in the J-Web user interface, or enter the show mpls lsp command.

Table 100 summarizes key output fields in the MPLS LSP information display.

Table 100: Summary of Key MPLS LSP Information Output Fields

Field

Values

Additional Information

Ingress LSP

Information about LSPs on the inbound device. Each session has one line of output.

Egress LSP

Information about the LSPs on the outbound device. Each session has one line of output.

MPLS learns this information by querying RSVP, which holds all the transit and outbound session information.

Transit LSP

Number of LSPs on the transit routers and the state of these paths.

MPLS learns this information by querying RSVP, which holds all the transit and outbound session information.

To

Destination (outbound device) of the session.

From

Source (inbound device) of the session.

State

State of the path. It can be Up, Down, or AdminDn.

AdminDn indicates that the LSP is being taken down gracefully.

Rt

Number of active routes (prefixes) installed in the routing table.

For inbound RSVP sessions, the routing table is the primary IPv4 table (inet.0). For transit and outbound RSVP sessions, the routing table is the primary MPLS table (mpls.0).

Active Path

Name of the active path: Primary or Secondary.

This field is used for inbound LSPs only.

P

An asterisk (*) in this column indicates that the LSP is a primary path.

This field is used for inbound LSPs only.

LSPname

Configured name of the LSP.

Style

RSVP reservation style. This field consists of two parts. The first is the number of active reservations. The second is the reservation style, which can be FF (fixed filter), SE (shared explicit), or WF (wildcard filter).

This field is used for outbound and transit LSPs only.

Labelin

Incoming label for this LSP.

Labelout

Outgoing label for this LSP.

Total

Total number of LSPs displayed for the particular type—ingress (inbound), egress (outbound), or transit.

See Also

Monitoring MPLS LSP Statistics

Purpose

Display statistics for LSP sessions currently active on the device, including the total number of packets and bytes forwarded through an LSP.

Action

Select Monitor>MPLS>LSP Statistics in the J-Web user interface, or enter the show mpls lsp statistics command.

Note Statistics are not available for LSPs on the outbound device, because the penultimate device in the LSP sets the label to 0. Also, as the packet arrives at the outbound device, the hardware removes its MPLS header and the packet reverts to being an IPv4 packet. Therefore, it is counted as an IPv4 packet, not an MPLS packet.

Table 101 summarizes key output fields in the MPLS LSP statistics display.

Table 101: Summary of Key MPLS LSP Statistics Output Fields

Field

Values

Additional Information

Ingress LSP

Information about LSPs on the inbound device. Each session has one line of output.

Egress LSP

Information about the LSPs on the outbound device. Each session has one line of output.

MPLS learns this information by querying RSVP, which holds all the transit and outbound session information.

Transit LSP

Number of LSPs on the transit routers and the state of these paths.

MPLS learns this information by querying RSVP, which holds all the transit and outbound session information.

To

Destination (outbound device) of the session.

From

Source (inbound device) of the session.

State

State of the path: Up, Down, or AdminDn.

AdminDn indicates that the LSP is being taken down gracefully.

Packets

Total number of packets received on the LSP from the upstream neighbor.

Bytes

Total number of bytes received on the LSP from the upstream neighbor.

LSPname

Configured name of the LSP.

Total

Total number of LSPs displayed for the particular type—ingress (inbound), egress (outbound), or transit.

See Also

Monitoring RSVP Session Information

Purpose

View information about RSVP-signaled LSP sessions currently active on the device, including inbound (ingress) and outbound (egress) addresses, LSP state, and LSP name.

Action

Select Monitor>MPLS>RSVP Sessions in the J-Web user interface, or enter the show rsvp session command.

Table 102 summarizes key output fields in the RSVP session information display.

Table 102: Summary of Key RSVP Session Information Output Fields

Field

Values

Additional Information

Ingress LSP

Information about inbound RSVP sessions. Each session has one line of output.

Egress LSP

Information about outbound RSVP sessions. Each session has one line of output.

MPLS learns this information by querying RSVP, which holds all the transit and outbound session information.

Transit LSP

Information about transit RSVP sessions.

MPLS learns this information by querying RSVP, which holds all the transit and outbound session information.

To

Destination (outbound device) of the session.

From

Source (inbound device) of the session.

State

State of the path: Up, Down, or AdminDn.

AdminDn indicates that the LSP is being taken down gracefully.

Rt

Number of active routes (prefixes) installed in the routing table.

For inbound RSVP sessions, the routing table is the primary IPv4 table (inet.0). For transit and outbound RSVP sessions, the routing table is the primary MPLS table (mpls.0).

Style

RSVP reservation style. This field consists of two parts. The first is the number of active reservations. The second is the reservation style, which can be FF (fixed filter), SE (shared explicit), or WF (wildcard filter).

This field is used for outbound and transit LSPs only.

Labelin

Incoming label for this RSVP session.

Labelout

Outgoing label for this RSVP session.

LSPname

Configured name of the LSP.

Total

Total number of RSVP sessions displayed for the particular type—ingress (inbound), egress (outbound), or transit).

See Also

Monitoring MPLS RSVP Interfaces Information

Purpose

View information about the interfaces on which RSVP is enabled, including the interface name, total bandwidth through the interface, and total current reserved and reservable (available) bandwidth on the interface.

Action

Select Monitor>MPLS>RSVP Interfaces in the J-Web user interface, or enter the show rsvp interface command.

Table 103 summarizes key output fields in the RSVP interfaces information display.

Table 103: Summary of Key RSVP Interfaces Information Output Fields

Field

Values

Additional Information

RSVP Interface

Number of interfaces on which RSVP is active. Each interface has one line of output.

Interface

Name of the interface.

State

State of the interface:

  • Disabled—No traffic engineering information is displayed.

  • Down—The interface is not operational.

  • Enabled—Displays traffic engineering information.

  • Up—The interface is operational.

Active resv

Number of reservations that are actively reserving bandwidth on the interface.

Subscription

User-configured subscription factor.

Static BW

Total interface bandwidth, in bits per second (bps).

Available BW

Amount of bandwidth that RSVP is allowed to reserve, in bits per second (bps). It is equal to (static bandwidth X subscription factor).

Reserved BW

Currently reserved bandwidth, in bits per second (bps).

Highwater mark

Highest bandwidth that has ever been reserved on this interface, in bits per second (bps).

See Also

Help us to improve. Rate this article.
Feedback Received. Thank You!

Ask questions in TechWiki

Check documentation in TechLibrary

Rating by you:      
X

Additional Comments

800 characters remaining

May we contact you if necessary?

Name:
Email:

Need product assistance? Contact Juniper Support

Submit