Help us improve your experience.

Let us know what you think.

Do you have time for a two-minute survey?

Navigation
Guide That Contains This Content
[+] Expand All
[-] Collapse All

    Service Attributes Overview

    A service is defined by a set of attributes. Some attributes are common to all service instances created from one service definition, and are therefore set during service definition time. Other attributes are specific to a service instance and must be set in the service order. Some attributes can be set either in the service definition or in the service order; in such cases it is up to the service designer to determine when the attribute will be set.

    The Network Activate user interface groups service attributes as follows:

    • General attributes—General information about the service, such as whether the service is point-to-point, multipoint-to-multipoint (full mesh VPLS), or point-to-multipoint VPLS, what signaling mechanism is used in the network core, whether quality of service (QoS) is enabled on the service, and who the enterprise customer is who uses the service.
    • Connectivity settings—Information about connectivity among customer sites through the network. For point-to-point Ethernet services in a network with LDP switching in the network core, these settings include the VC ID. For multipoint Ethernet (or VPLS) services, these settings include the route target and route distinguisher.
    • Advanced settings—Information about advanced connectivity among customer sites through the network. For multipoint Ethernet (or VPLS) services, these settings include tunnel services, local switching, fast-reroute-priority, label block size, and connection type.
    • UNI settings—Information about each customer site, including the N-PE device and interface the site uses to connect to the network, the encapsulation method used (physical and logical), MTU, customer VLAN ID and range, service VLAN ID, bandwidth limiting, and so on.

    General Attributes

    The following general attributes are defined for each service:

    Service Type

    The Service type attribute specifies a network topology to include in the service definition.

    The service type is the first attribute to be determined during service definition. It can be one of the following values:

    • Point-to-point Ethernet—Virtual circuit between two customer sites in the network core.
    • Multipoint-to-multipoint Ethernet (VPLS) —Virtual private LAN service (VPLS) among multiple customer sites in the network core to provide full mesh connectivity.
    • Point-to-multipoint Ethernet (VPLS) —VPLS among multiple customer sites in the network core to provide connectivity between a hub site and multiple spoke sites.

    Signaling

    The Signaling attribute specifies the protocol that controls signaling in the network core. You can select BGP or LDP.

    Signaling

    The Comments attribute .

    Signaling

    The Service Template attribute .

    Signaling

    The Threshold Alarm Profile attribute.

    Signaling

    The Interface type attribute . You can specify one of the following:

    • Ethernet
    • TDM
    • ATM

    Enabling Additional Features

    In addition to the interface type, depending on the Service type topology and Signaling you specify, you can enable the following features for a service:

    • Static pseudowire—For networks that do not support LDP or do not have LDP enabled. You define pseudowires by configuring static values for the inbound and outbound labels of the connection.
    • Enable PW access to L3 VPN networks
    • Enable L3 Access
    • Enable PW Extension
    • Enable PW Resiliency
    • Decouple Service Status from Port Status—Isolates events related to an interface in the OpenNMS database. Only traps related to pseudowires are monitored.

    Customer

    This attribute specifies the enterprise customer who will use the service instance. This attribute is always specified in the service order.

    Enable QoS

    This attribute specifies whether QoS is enabled on the service to divide traffic into classes and offer various levels of throughput and packet loss when congestion occurs. When you enable QoS in the service definition, the QoS Settings box appears when you configure the service order.

    Note: When you enable QoS in the service definition, bandwidth settings are not configurable in the service order.

    Note: A QoS profile that specifies a level-three scheduler is not supported on port-to-port services.

    UNI Settings

    The following attributes are defined for the service endpoints or customer sites that are connected by the service:

    Ethernet Options

    This attribute identifies the interface type at the endpoint by defining the level of packet tagging for the UNI. It can have the following values:

    • asymmetric tag depth

      Allows port-based, 802.1Q and Q-in-Q interfaces for UNIs to coexist in a service.

    • port-port

      Transfers all data from the UNI to the other end of the LSP trunk.

    • dot1q

      An 802.1Q interface that tags each packet with a VLAN ID, thus allowing a specific VLAN to traverse the network.

    • qinq

      A Q-in-Q interface that double tags each frame. The inner tag is added by the service provider. The service provider can use this inner tag to differentiate among services. For example, you can configure VLANs for a customer’s intranet with a different inner tag from VLANs used for working with providers or partners.

    Interface

    Specifies the physical interface on the N-PE device that connects the customer site or CE device to the N-PE device.

    MTU

    The maximum transmission unit (MTU) represents the largest frame size, in bytes, that passes through the UNI. MTU is configurable.

    Note: This value is distinct from the MTU assigned to the connectivity in the network core.

    Customer Traffic Type

    This attribute places restrictions on the traffic that can be transported across the network by the associated service. It can have the following values:

    • Transport single VLAN

      Restricts the associated service to transporting just one VLAN across the network. You can use this option with 802.1Q and Q-in-Q interface types.

    • Transport VLAN range

      Allows the associated service to transport a range of VLANs across the network. You can use this option with 802.1Q and Q-in-Q interface types.

    • Transport all traffic

      Allows the associated service to transport all traffic across the network. You can use this option with Q-in-Q interface types only.

      The traffic type attribute is not applicable to port-to-port services. Port-to-port services always transport all traffic.

    Customer VLAN ID

    Specifies a VLAN ID that is attached to each packet to permit VLANs to be shared across the network.

    This attribute can be used only with 802.1Q and Q-in-Q interface types.

    Service VLAN ID and VLAN ID Range

    The service VLAN ID (VLAN ID) specifies a second level of tagging to segregate groups of VLANs.

    The VLAN range specifies a range of VLANs to be transported across the network by associating them with a service VLAN ID.

    These options are configurable only for Q-in-Q interfaces.

    Physical Encapsulation

    Specifies the physical link-layer encapsulation type.

    • flexible-ethernet-services—Offers the most flexibility, depending on the characteristics of the N-PE device and its line modules.

      For Gigabit Ethernet IQ interfaces and Gigabit Ethernet PICs with small form-factor pluggable transceivers (SFPs) only, use flexible Ethernet services encapsulation when you want to configure multiple per-unit Ethernet encapsulations. This encapsulation type allows you to configure any combination of route, TCC, CCC, and VPLS encapsulations on a single physical port. Aggregated Ethernet bundles cannot use this encapsulation type. If you configure flexible Ethernet services encapsulation on the physical interface, VLAN IDs from 1 through 511 are no longer reserved for normal VLANs.

      In the Junos Space Network Activate product, you can use this encapsulation type with 802.1Q interfaces and Q-in-Q interfaces in point-to-point Ethernet services and in multipoint Ethernet services.

    • vlan-ccc—You can use Ethernet VLAN encapsulation on CCC interfaces. This option restricts the range of available VLAN IDs to 512 through 4094. VLAN IDs 1 through 511 are reserved for internal use.

      In the Junos Space Network Activate product, you can use this encapsulation type with 802.1Q interfaces and Q-in-Q interfaces in point-to-point services.

    • extended-vlan-ccc—Use extended VLAN encapsulation on CCC interfaces with Gigabit Ethernet interfaces that must accept packets carrying 802.1Q values.

      In the Junos Space Network Activate product, you can use this encapsulation type with 802.1Q interfaces and Q-in-Q interfaces in point-to-point services.

    • ethernet-vpls—Use Ethernet VPLS encapsulation on Ethernet interfaces that have VPLS enabled and that must accept packets carrying standard TPID values.

      In the Junos Space Network Activate product, this encapsulation is used only for dedicated port interface types in multipoint Ethernet services.

    Logical Encapsulation

    Specifies the logical link-layer encapsulation type. Logical encapsulation with 802.1Q interfaces allows you to route multiple services through the same physical interface.

    • vlan-ccc—Use Ethernet virtual LAN (VLAN) encapsulation on CCC interfaces. When you use this encapsulation type, you can configure the family ccc only.
    • extended-vlan-ccc—Use extended VLAN encapsulation on CCC interfaces with Gigabit Ethernet interfaces that must accept packets carrying 802.1Q values.
    • vlan-vpls—Use VLAN VPLS encapsulation on Ethernet interfaces with VLAN tagging and VPLS enabled. Interfaces with VLAN VPLS encapsulation accept packets carrying standard Tag Protocol (TPID) values only.

    Table 1 defines the logical encapsulation types that are valid for each physical encapsulation type in a point-to-point Ethernet service.

    Table 1: Physical and Logical Encapsulation Compatibilities in Point-to-Point Ethernet Services

    Physical Encapsulation

    Logical Encapsulation

    Valid Interface Types

    flexible-ethernet-services

    vlan-ccc

    802.1Q and Q-in-Q

    vlan-ccc

    vlan-ccc

    802.1Q and Q-in-Q

    extended-vlan-ccc

    extended-vlan-ccc

    802.1Q and Q-in-Q

    ethernet-ccc

    not applicable

    dedicated port

    Table 2 defines the logical encapsulation types that are valid for each physical encapsulation type in multipoint Ethernet services.

    Table 2: Physical and Logical Encapsulation Compatibilities in Multipoint Ethernet (VPLS) Services

    Physical Encapsulation

    Logical Encapsulation

    Valid Interface Types

    flexible-ethernet-services

    vlan-vpls

    802.1Q and Q-in-Q

    ethernet-vpls

    not applicable

    dedicated port

    Rate Limiting and Bandwidth

    Rate limiting allows you to specify the maximum bandwidth permitted for a service.

    The burst rate is automatically calculated as two times the MTU of the UNI.

    Note: When a service is QoS enabled, you cannot configure rate limiting and bandwidth in the service.

    UNI Settings for TDM Interfaces

    The following TDM options are configurable for TDM interfaces:

    • Physical IF encapsulation—satop or cesopsn
    • Jitter buffer

      M Series: 1 through 340

      BX7000 Gateway: 2K through 32K

    • Idle pattern—0 through 255
    • Excessive packet loss rate—1 through 100%
    • Payload size

      M Series: 64 through 1024

      BX7000 Gateway: 24 through 1440

    UNI Settings for ATM Interfaces

    The following ATM options are configurable for ATM interfaces:

    • Physical IF encapsulation—The type of encapsulation to apply to the interface. Use atm-ccc-cell-relay for ATM cell relay encapsulation. Use atm-ccc-cell-mux for ATM VC for CCC.
    • VPI selection—The virtual path identifier
    • VCI selection—This integer uniquely identifies the virtual circuit that the service uses.
    • Cell bundle size—Cell bundle size can be 1 through 34.

    Connectivity Settings

    The following attributes are defined for the connectivity among UNI endpoints across the network:

    Virtual Private LAN Service Identifier (VPLS ID)

    This VPLS ID is available if the signaling is LDP and the Auto Discovery check box is disabled. The VPLS ID can be selected automatically or manually. The VPLS ID identifies the virtual circuit identifier used for the VPLS routing instance.

    Auto Discovery

    The Auto Discovery check box is available only if the signaling is LDP. If you enable Auto Discovery, the attributes Route target, Route distinguisher, and VPN ID appear and are provisionable.

    Virtual Circuit Identifier (VCID) (Point-to-Point Services Only)

    This unique identifier can be assigned automatically from a pool of VCIDs or can be manually specified. It uniquely identifies a point-to-point virtual circuit through the network and is provided for all switched point-to-point services.

    Route Targets and Route Distinguishers

    Route targets and route distinguishers are applied to point-to-point services in which BGP controls the connections in the network core.

    Route targets and route distinguishers are always automatically generated by the Junos Space software for multipoint Ethernet (VPLS) services. Route targets and route distinguishers designate the multipoint connectivity among the participating endpoints of a multipoint service. They identify the members of the virtual LAN.

    Normalized VLAN (Multipoint Services Only)

    Similar to point-to-point Ethernet services, the UNIs of VPLS services can be port-to-port, 802.1Q, or Q-in-Q. The type of VLAN mapping—or normalization—is specified in the service definition. VLAN normalization applies only to MX Series devices.

    Normalization supports automatic mapping of VLANs and performs operations on VLAN tags to achieve the desired translation. The Network Activate software supports the following forms of VLAN normalization:

    • Normalize to VLAN all—The customer VLAN ID is preserved across the network. That is, the broadcast domain includes the interfaces that have the same VLAN ID across the VPLS service. For double-tagged packets (Q-in-Q interfaces), a pop operation at ingress strips the service VLAN ID from the packet. A corresponding push operation at egress inserts the service VLAN ID known at the local site. Hence, the service VLAN ID at egress does not have to match the service VLAN ID at ingress.

      For single-tagged packets (802.1Q interfaces), “Normalize to VLAN All” has no effect, because the packet has no service VLAN ID to pop or push.

    • Normalize to VLAN none—The customer VLAN ID is not preserved across the network. The broadcast domain includes all VLANs at any site provisioned in the service. For single-tagged packets (802.1Q interfaces), a pop operation at ingress removes the customer VLAN ID from the packet. A corresponding push operation at egress adds a local customer VLAN ID.

      For double-tagged packets (Q-in-Q interfaces), both customer VLAN ID and service VLAN ID are popped from the packet at ingress and pushed at egress.

    • Normalize to Dot1q tag— The VLAN tag is preserved across the network. The broadcast domain includes all VLANs at any site provisioned in the service. For information about how frames are translated to provide the required VLAN tags for interfaces with different tag heights, see the section “VLAN Mapping for VPLS Services” in Understanding VLAN Manipulation (Normalization and VLAN Mapping) on Ethernet Services.
    • Normalize to QinQ tags—The inner VLAN tag and outer VLAN tag are preserved across the network. The broadcast domain includes all VLANs at any site provisioned in the service. For information about how frames are translated to provide the required VLAN tags for interfaces with different tag heights, see the section “VLAN Mapping for VPLS Services” in Understanding VLAN Manipulation (Normalization and VLAN Mapping) on Ethernet Services.
    • Normalization not required—For port-to-port services only. Specifies that normalization is not used.

    If normalization is not used, then all customer VLAN IDs and all service VLAN IDs must match to be part of the same broadcast domain. Services with dedicated port interfaces cannot use normalization.

    Normalization works well with automatically assigned VLAN IDs, because the service provider does not need to specify the VLAN IDs that are popped and pushed. Without normalization, the service provider must specify explicitly the customer VLAN ID and the service VLAN ID.

    Note: For a description of how the Network Activate software manipulates VLANs, see Understanding VLAN Manipulation (Normalization and VLAN Mapping) on Ethernet Services.

    Multihoming

    You can enable multihoming to connect a customer site to multiple PE devices to provide redundant connectivity while preventing the formation of Layer 2 loops in the service provider’s network. A VPLS site that is multihomed to multiple PE devices provides redundant connectivity in the event of a PE device to CE device link failure or the failure of a PE device.

    MAC Learning

    You can enable MAC learning for a virtual switch, for a bridge domain, for a specific logical interface in a bridge domain, or for a set of bridge domains associated with a Layer 2 trunk port. MAC learning is enabled by default.

    When MAC learning is enabled, you can configure the following settings:

    Interface MAC Limit

    You can specify the maximum number of media access control (MAC) addresses that can be learned by the VPLS routing instance. You can configure the same limit for all interfaces configured for a routing instance. You can also configure a limit for a specific interface. The default is 1024 addresses. The range is 16 through 65,536 MAC addresses. This option is supported for MX-series routers only.

    MAC Statistics

    You can enable MAC accounting either for a specific bridge domain, or for a set of bridge domains associated with a Layer 2 trunk port. MAC statistics is disabled by default. This option is supported for MX-series routers only.

    MAC Table Size

    You can modify the size of the MAC address table for the bridge domain, a set of bridge domains associated with a trunk port, or a virtual switch. The default is 5120 MAC addresses.

    Advanced Settings

    The following attributes are defined for advanced connectivity among UNI endpoints across the network:

    Tunnel Services

    You can enable tunnel services to specify that traffic for particular VPLS routing instances be forwarded to specific virtual tunnel (VT) interfaces, allowing you to load-balance VPLS traffic among all the available VT interfaces on the router.

    Tunnel services are disabled by default.

    Local Switching

    In local switching mode, you can terminate multiple Layer 2 circuit pseudowires at a single VPLS mesh group.

    Local switching is disabled by default.

    Note: In a point-to-multipoint topology, you must enable local switching on the hub router and disable local switching on the spokes.

    Fast Reroute Priority

    Specify the fast reroute priority for a VPLS routing instance. You can configure high, medium, or low fast reroute priority to prioritize specific VPLS routing instances for faster convergence and traffic restoration. Because the router repairs next hops for high-priority VPLS routing instances first, the traffic traversing a VPLS routing instance configured with high fast reroute priority is restored faster than the traffic for VPLS routing instances configured with medium or low fast reroute priority. The default setting is LOW.

    Label Block Size

    VPLS MPLS packets have a two-label stack. The outer label is used for normal MPLS forwarding in the service provider’s network. If BGP is used to establish VPLS, the inner label is allocated by a PE router as part of a label block. One inner label is needed for each remote VPLS site. Four sizes are supported. We recommend using the default size of 8, unless the network design requires a different size for optimal label usage, to allow the router to support a larger number of VPLS instances.

    If you allocate a large number of small label blocks to increase efficiency, you also increase the number of routes in the VPLS domain. This has an impact on the control plane overhead.

    Changing the configured label block size causes all existing pseudowires to be deleted. For example, if you configure the label block size to be 4 and then change the size to 8, all existing label blocks of size 4 are deleted, which means that all existing pseudowires are deleted. The new label block of size 8 is created, and new pseudowires are established.

    Four label block sizes are supported: 2, 4, 8, and 16. Consider the following scenarios:

    • 2—Allocate the label blocks in increments of 2. For a VPLS domain that has only two sites with no future expansion plans.
    • 4—Allocate the label blocks in increments of 4.
    • 8 (default)—Allocate the label blocks in increments of 8.
    • 16—Allocate the label blocks in increments of 16. A label block size of 16 enables you to minimize the number of routes in the VPLS domain. Use this setting only if the number of routes is the most important concern.

    Connectivity Type

    You can configure the VPLS routing instance to take down or maintain its VPLS connections depending on the status of the interfaces configured for the VPLS routing instance. By default, the VPLS connection is taken down whenever a customer-facing interface configured for the VPLS routing instance fails. This behavior is explicitly configured by specifying the ce option. You can alternatively specify the irb option to ensure that the VPLS connection remain up so long as an integrated routing and bridging (IRB) interface is configured for the VPLS routing instance.

    Modified: 2017-02-02